Monthly Archives: November 2019

What is the cost of the repro status quo?

What is the cost of the repro status quo?

Kerry Halladay

Western Livestock JournalThere’s a lot going on on your ranch and sometimes it’s just easier doing things the way you’ve always done them. It might be easier, but is it the most economic choice? According to presenters at the 2019 Range Beef Cow Symposium, held Nov. 18-20 in Mitchell, NE, the cost of sticking to the old standby of natural service might be higher than producers think, in both actual dollars lost and potential gains left on the table.

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Ethan Lane Tells Bird Stories- Talking Buzzards and Lesser Prairie Chickens

Ethan Lane Tells Bird Stories- Talking Buzzards and Lesser Prairie Chickens

Oklahoma Farm Report

One of the things that Lane has taken an interest in is a letter that was put together by several members of Congress concerning Avian predators. For example, in our part of the world, the predators of greatest interest are black buzzards. Lane says, “The bipartisan letter that was sent to the department of interior is really a positive sign. Dozens of members of Congress, senators, bicameral, bipartisan, voicing their support with producers for some kind of movement on this issue.”

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Stocker Strategies:  Start With Something Good

Stocker Strategies:  Start With Something Good

Becky Mills
Progressive Farmer

Repeat customers are at the center of Adam Wilson’s business philosophy. “My goal is to provide the best product I can to the next person in the supply chain,” says the young Virginia stocker. To achieve that goal, he believes it’s important to start with quality.

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Put weight on thin cows before winter

Put weight on thin cows before winter

Jake Geis, DVM

Beef Magazine

With the grass so washy for much of the Midwest this year, there are some herds with the cows looking a little thin. Since the calves have been weaned, now is the best time to start putting weight back on those cows.

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How Americans Got Red Meat Wrong

How Americans Got Red Meat Wrong

Nina Teicholz

The Atlantic

Infants were fed beef even before their teeth had grown in. The English novelist Anthony Trollope reported, during a trip to the United States in 1861, that Americans ate twice as much beef as did Englishmen. Charles Dickens, when he visited, wrote that “no breakfast was breakfast” without a T-bone steak. Apparently, starting a day on puffed wheat and low-fat milk—our “Breakfast of Champions!”—would not have been considered adequate even for a servant.

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Tips to Building a Successful Breeding Program

Tips to Building a Successful Breeding Program

VitaFerm

Cow-calf producers have a checklist of endless options in order to be successful. They can choose the breed or breeds they want to incorporate into their herds. They can choose a time of year to calve based on their marketing strategy and demand. They can choose from a multitude of health and nutrition protocols. And they can choose from several breeding programs to make their operation successful.

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Meeting Hay Challenges

Meeting Hay Challenges

Emily Beal

Angus Beef Bulletin

Cattlemen are feeling the brunt of last spring’s unprecedented rainfall. Finding hay that is both affordable and sufficiently nutritious has been one roadblock this year for farmers. Something even more alarming than rising hay prices could be looming. A nutritional deficiency could be sneaking into herds during this record-breaking year in agriculture.

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