Daily Archives: November 20, 2019

Mark Parker:  The Top 10 farmer talents

Mark Parker:  The Top 10 farmer talents

FarmTalk

#10. With a little imagination and a big hammer, he can make parts fit that shouldn’t.

#9. Although he didn’t do well at math in school, he can figure interest payments in his head.

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Help for Figuring Feed Costs, Cow-Calf Share Lease Rates And More

Help for Figuring Feed Costs, Cow-Calf Share Lease Rates And More

Kathy Voth

On Pasture

One of the reasons some of us don’t track our costs well, or we find out too late that something we’re doing is more expensive than we anticipated, is that math is hard!

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When the self-employed rancher needs backup

When the self-employed rancher needs backup

Billy Whitehurst

Progressive Cattle

Many who are self-employed falsely think they own a business. The reality is that most of us simply own a job. There’s nothing wrong with that, but owning a job has no longevity and isn’t really anything that can be passed to future generations in a fashion that is sustainable.

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Checkoff-funded Masters of Beef Advocacy program reaches 15,000 graduates

Checkoff-funded Masters of Beef Advocacy program reaches 15,000 graduates

AgriNews

Just 10 years after its inception, the Beef Checkoff-funded Masters of Beef Advocacy program celebrated its 15,000th graduate in August. The program was created to equip and engage beef industry advocates to communicate about beef and beef production. It is one of the strongest beef advocacy efforts in the industry.

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Poor harvest conditions affect silage quality and quantity

Poor harvest conditions affect silage quality and quantity

Jenny Schlecht, Michelle Rook

AgWeek

Silage quality and quantity will be an issue for beef cattle as well. Bruce Lindgren, a crop adjuster for Nodak Insurance, was appraising corn meant for silage on Nov. 8 in Stutsman County, N.D. The insurance period for silage corn ended Sept. 30, but many producers weren’t able to chop their corn because of the wet conditions.

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Kansas Tyson beef plant to resume operations in December

Kansas Tyson beef plant to resume operations in December

AgDaily

Following the Aug. 9 fire that disrupted operations at its Holcomb, Kansas, beef complex, Tyson Fresh Meats, the beef and pork subsidiary of Tyson Foods Inc., announced reconstruction of the facility is near completion. Efforts to resume harvest operations will begin the first week of December, with intentions to be fully operational by the first week of January.

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Purebred Hereford farm tries new technique for silage

Purebred Hereford farm tries new technique for silage

Mikkel Pates

Agweek

When you’re in the registered cattle business, there is just no choice but to secure winter feed to ensure proper calving in the spring. If you don’t have high-quality feed, you improvise. You don’t want to send any of your valuable seedstock cattle down the road.

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Beef Cutout Prices: Widely Reported, Yet Wildly Misunderstood

Beef Cutout Prices: Widely Reported, Yet Wildly Misunderstood

Greg Henderson

Drovers

Frustration and anger were common themes in cattle country in the weeks after a fire at Tyson’s Finney County, Kan., packing facility. Much of that frustration centered around the fact that while fed cattle prices plunged lower, Choice boxed beef cutout values soared higher.

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Corn stalks provide another grazing option

Corn stalks provide another grazing option

RORY LEWANDOWSKI

This Week

Over the past several weeks, a considerable amount of corn has been harvested for grain. The corn stalk residue or fodder that remains offers another grazing opportunity for beef cattle or sheep.

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Protect Cattle from Lepto and Other Feral-Swine Disease

Protect Cattle from Lepto and Other Feral-Swine Disease

Bovine Veterinarian

With nearly 77% of all livestock located in regions with feral swine and up to 34 known diseases those swine can transmit, it’s crucial for beef producers to protect their cattle from exposure to feral-swine disease risks.

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