Monthly Archives: March 2006

New Evidence Questions Simple Link Between Prion Proteins And ‘Mad Cow’ Disease

New Evidence Questions Simple Link Between Prion Proteins And ‘Mad Cow’ Disease

Science Daily

While newly published research confirms that under laboratory circumstances prion-protein can be absorbed across the gut, it also shows that this is unlikely to occur in real life. In addition, the results show that the places in the gut that do take up these disease-associated proteins are different from the locations where infectivity is known to be amplified. The findings will be published in the Journal of Pathology.

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Feedlot cattle perform better with consistent feeding times

Feedlot cattle perform better with consistent feeding times

By DONNA FARRIS,
For Minnesota Farm & Ranch Guide
Thursday, March 30, 2006 11:01 AM CST

Consistency is key when considering feeding schedules on a feedlot, according to Robbi Pritchard, ruminant nutritionist at South Dakota State University.

It’s been known since the 1920s that when feeding schedules bounce around just 15 minutes from one day to the next, it affects cattle performance, Pritchard said.

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Brandt Tracks Its Beef

Brandt Tracks Its Beef

RFID Journal

The California beef producer is using an RFID and bar-code system to track cattle from birth all the way to the retail market.
By Claire Swedberg

Mar. 31, 2006—Beef producer Brandt Beef, of Brawley, Calif., is using an RFID and bar-code tracking system to keep track of its cattle, from birth to beef.

By using the GlobalTrack system from GTR-Datastar, Brandt can automatically trace beef directly back from a retail site, such as supermarket or restaurant, to the specific animal and its origins.

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U.S. Commerce Secretary Asks Japan to Resume U.S. Beef Imports

U.S. Commerce Secretary Asks Japan to Resume U.S. Beef Imports

Bloomberg.com/Japanhearld

March 31 (Bloomberg) — Japan should resume imports of U.S. beef and give the country an opportunity to show U.S. beef is safe, said U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez.

Japan, once the biggest overseas customer for U.S. beef, halted imports after inspectors found banned cattle parts in a shipment in January. That was just a month after Japan lifted a two-year ban on the U.S. meat, imposed when a cow in Washington state was diagnosed with mad-cow disease.

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BeefTalk: Paranoia can overwhelm common sense solutions


BeefTalk: Paranoia can overwhelm common sense solutions

By KRIS RINGWALL, NDSU Extension Beef Specialist
Thursday, March 30, 2006 11:01 AM CST
Minnesota Farm Guide

“When will spring arrive?” That was the common question one heard as the week started out. The calendar says spring is here, but the temperatures, at least in the northern Plains, have not been “springlike.” Beef producers are hoping that, in concert with the arrival of new calves, the weather will warm up and Mother Nature will take on a momentary gentleness.

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Farm Maintenance Welding Workshop

Farm Maintenance Welding Workshop
April 4-7, Cleveland, Ohio

Angus E-list

Class sessions are planned for 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily and will be taught by Lincoln Electric corporate trainers. Participants, who must be at least 18 years old, can register for one day for $100 or for all four days for $350. To register contact Vicki Wilson at Lincoln Electric at (216) 383-2240 or vicki_wilson@lincolnelectric.com, or download the registration materials from the Ohio FFA Organization Web site at www.ohioffa.org/foundation/docs/ffa4-hweldingschool.pdf.

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NIAA Annual Meeting

NIAA Annual Meeting
April 3-6, Louisville, Ky.

Angus e-list

The 2006 Annual Meeting of the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) will take place at the Galt House Hotel and Suites in Louisville.

The meeting will include presentations by more than 50 of the world’s most recognized experts on animal health issues, including avian influenza, foot and mouth disease (FMD), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and other domestic and foreign animal diseases (FADs).

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