Daily Archives: November 15, 2019

Bale Grazing to Feed the Herds Above and Below Ground

Bale Grazing to Feed the Herds Above and Below Ground

Kathy Voth

On Pasture

Producer Kalyn Bohle has given it some thought. Bohle has land six miles southwest of Plevna, Mont. There, with his wife and three kids, he raises 150 head of black Angus cows. And yes, he thinks about the soil surface and what lies beneath it. “The little herd that’s in the soil – they’ve gotta eat too,” says Bohle.

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Taking care of lice

Taking care of lice

Jason Banta

Progressive Cattle

With November here, it is time to make sure cattle are ready for the winter. November or December is the time when most operations treat cattle for lice. Lice are easily transmitted from animal to animal, so it is critical to treat all animals in the herd and also to treat any new animals before introducing them.

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Beef and Blockchain :  The Price of a Story

Beef and Blockchain :  The Price of a Story

Loretta Sorensen
DTN\Progressive Farmer

For anyone trying to understand what blockchain is and what it could mean for the U.S. beef industry, Wyoming state senator and beef producer Ogden Driskill describes it as “source verification on steroids.”

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Clay Mathis with King Ranch Institute for Ranch Management Explains How to Find Profitability in Today’s Cow Calf Operations

Clay Mathis with King Ranch Institute for Ranch Management Explains How to Find Profitability in Today’s Cow Calf Operations

Oklahoma Farm Report

Mathis says it starts with understanding where you can find leverage in your production system. “We know if we are strictly focused on profitability we can look at the cost side of the business and know that its going to boil down to labor, feed, and depreciation, and collectively those will make up more than 50% of the total cost to the enterprise.”

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Frequently Asked Questions about Grazing Corn Residue Fields with Excessive Downed Corn

Frequently Asked Questions about Grazing Corn Residue Fields with Excessive Downed Corn

Mary Drewnoski

University of Nebraska

Putting cows out on corn fields with a lot of corn is a recipe for acidosis (grain overload), abortion, and possibly death, if their rumen bacteria are not properly prepared. Cattle that become acidotic for even a short time can have reduced performance long term due to damage to the rumen wall. Therefore, taking the time to avoid acidosis is very important.

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Why Sustainability?

Why Sustainability?

Colter Brown

Northern AG Network

When the topic of sustainability comes up in conversation in cattle circles, it’s common to see heads shaking. It’s not a topic we like to discuss in our industry – primarily because it’s so often raised with bad intentions and worse information.

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Value From Variety

Value From Variety

Kindra Gordon

Angus Journal

In American culture, steaks, burgers and roasts tend to dominate consumers’ preferred beef choices. But internationally, consumers’ palates are much more diverse. Japanese consumers enjoy beef tongue; the Mexican market has a penchant for tripe; and in Egypt, consumers have an affinity for beef liver.

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They employ cows

They employ cows

Martha Hollida Garrett

Southern Livestock

Tommy Brandenberger is passionate about the beef industry and even more passionate in his belief that it needs to be profitable. He’s had a lifetime of lessons in what works and what doesn’t work in the cow/calf segment. He and his wife, Susan, own and operate the 96 Cattle Company in Hallettsville, Texas. Their cowherd or their employees as he calls them, reflect their goal of profitability and their passion for cattle.

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NCBA report says U.S. leader in sustainable beef production

NCBA report says U.S. leader in sustainable beef production

Prairie Farmer
The U.S. is the leader in sustainable beef production, according to a white paper authored by Sara Place, PhD, senior director of sustainable beef production research at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff.

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Anthrax: A disease of antiquity spread by ancient human migration

Anthrax: A disease of antiquity spread by ancient human migration

Dr. Ron Clarke

Canadian Cattlemen

Historians think anthrax originated in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Biblical scholars suggest that during Moses’ time and through the 10 plagues of Egypt, anthrax may have caused the fifth plague, captured in ancient script as a sickness affecting horses, cattle, sheep, camels and oxen. Homer described a plague that many believe to be anthrax in The Iliad (700 BC), as did Virgil in poems written during his life (70 to 19 BC).

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