Daily Archives: March 30, 2006

Ohio Beef Newsletter now available

The March 29, issue # 480, of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter is now posted to the web at: http://fairfield.osu.edu/ag/beef/beefMarc29.html

This time of year, we frequently get calls here in the county office from homeowners wanting to know if they should fertilize their lawn because “the neighbors are.” This week, Jeff McCutcheon suggests that just because your neighbor might be pulling a fertilizer spreader across his pasture, it may not be the most economical thing to do to your pasture.

Articles this week include:
* Can you measure what you manage?
* Fertilizing Pastures in the Spring
* Cattle Cycles: Where are we and where are we headed?
* Weekly Purcell Agricultural Commodity Market Report

Stan
———-
Stan Smith
Program Assistant, Agriculture
OSU Extension, Fairfield County
831 College Ave., Suite D
Lancaster, OH 43130

e-mail: smith.263@osu.edu
voice: 740.653.5419 ext. 24
fax: 740.687.7010
Visit:
Fairfield Co. OSU Extension – http://fairfield.osu.edu
OSU Beef Team – http://beef.osu.edu
Ohio Bull Test – http://bulltest.osu.edu

BLACK INK — MANAGE TO WIN

BLACK INK — MANAGE TO WIN

by: Steve Suther
Cattletoday.com

If you care about your reputation as a calf supplier, you have to care about how they work for the next segment or link in the beef chain. Genetics can make a big difference in feedlot and carcass value potential, but management and environment can be up to five times more important.

FULL STORY

U.S. Sets More Training for Beef Workers

U.S. Sets More Training for Beef Workers

By CARL FREIRE

TOKYO Mar 29, 2006 (AP)— The United States has agreed to require further training of American workers handling beef exports to Japan, U.S. agriculture officials said Wednesday.

The U.S. delegation, led by Chuck Lambert, undersecretary for marketing and regulatory programs, finished two days of talks in Japan in hopes of lifting Tokyo’s ban on U.S. beef.

FULL STORY

Livestock producers should be concerned about bird flu

Livestock producers should be concerned about bird flu

By Tim Petry, NDSU Livestock Marketing Economist
Wednesday, March 29, 2006 2:20 PM CST
Tri State Neighbor

At several meetings that I have presented at this year, livestock producers have asked if avian influenza, commonly referred to as bird flu, would impact livestock prices.

One cattle producer commented that he thought bird flu could be good, since destroying chickens would mean less competitive meat for the beef industry.

FULL STORY

Cattlemen focus on the border

Cattlemen focus on the border

Web Posted: 03/30/2006 12:00 AM CST

William Pack
Express-News Business Writer
Mysanantonio.com

The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association ended its annual convention Wednesday determined to see a two-pronged approach to immigration reform and nervous about the impacts of the ongoing drought.

Matt Brockman, the association’s executive vice president, said the 13,600-member organization supports measures that increase border security, but also endorses an effective temporary worker program that addresses the ranching industry’s labor needs.

FULL STORY

Health, breed add value to calves

Health, breed add value to calves

Angus Journal

While the price of beef calves increased from 1995 to 2005, so did premiums for health management and Angus breed type. That’s despite the fact that supplies of such cattle increased over time. In a long-term study of calf values — 3.2 million head in 25,847 lots sold through Superior Livestock Video Auction — a Colorado State University (CSU) data analyst compared prices for three different health protocols.

FULL STORY

Patient Sues for Possible Disease Exposure

Patient Sues for Possible Disease Exposure

By DANIEL YEE
The Associated Press
Phillyburbs.com

ATLANTA – A woman has filed a lawsuit against Emory Healthcare after she underwent surgery there with instruments that had been exposed to a fatal disease similar to the human version of mad cow disease.

FULL STORY