Daily Archives: February 18, 2020

Baxter Black: SHOEIN’ PIGEYE

Baxter Black:   SHOEIN’ PIGEYE

Just count me out,” said Wilford as he lay there in the dirt,

A shoein’ rasp behind his ear, a hoof print on his shirt.

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Check Cattle for Lice in Late Winter/Early Spring

Check Cattle for Lice in Late Winter/Early Spring

Rory Lewandowski

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Check beef and dairy cattle for lice infestations during the late winter and early spring months.  Although lice can be present throughout the entire year, high numbers of lice are most likely during winter months when cattle have longer, thicker hair coats, which make self-grooming less effective in reducing lice numbers.

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This Farmer Finds Annual Pastures Are a Great Option for Soil and Animal Health

This Farmer Finds Annual Pastures Are a Great Option for Soil and Animal Health

Kathy Voth

On Pasture

Tim Tobin started planting annuals for two reasons. First, he wanted to transition some crop fields to perennial pastures and annuals were a good first step. He also wanted to smother out the Kentucky 31 fescue in some of his pastures. He liked the results so much, that it looks like annuals will become a permanent part of his operation.

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The Earlage Option: More Producers Are Picking Up on this Alternative

The Earlage Option: More Producers Are Picking Up on this Alternative

Loretta Sorensen
DTN\Progressive Farmer

Sometimes, the old ways are the best. That’s how Eric Christensen feels about earlage in cattle rations. He’s following his grandfather’s practice of using the ensiled corn product here on the family’s eastern-Colorado operation, Christensen Ranch.

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Genetic tool will be used to predict heat tolerance and tolerance to fescue toxicosis.

Genetic tool will be used to predict heat tolerance and tolerance to fescue toxicosis.

American Angus Association

The American Angus Association launches a research expected progeny difference (EPD) for hair shedding Feb. 5, 2020. The research EPD has been in development since 2011 and is now brought to fruition through the collaboration of the American Angus Association, Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI), Mississippi State University, North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri (MU). Early summer shedding is an indicator for both heat tolerance and tolerance to fescue toxicosis, and it lends discussion to a genetic correlation between a dam’s shedding score and the weaning weights of a calf.

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Why some scientists are skeptical of ‘carbon-neutral’ beef

Why some scientists are skeptical of ‘carbon-neutral’ beef

Sam Schipani

Bangor Daily News

About 25 years ago, Will Harris, owner of White Oak Pastures in Bluffton, Georgia, decided to change the way he grazed his land. Instead of allowing his cows to continuously graze on a pasture, Harris began moving his animals every day, letting the plants fully recover before the animals return to graze again.

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Why you can’t ignore the sustainability chatter any longer

Why you can’t ignore the sustainability chatter any longer

Lynn Gordon

Beef Magazine

The conversation about sustainability is dominating discussions in agriculture and the livestock industry due to the false narrative spread to consumers that cows are worse for the environment than cars. Inaccurate research models have beef consumers believing cattle emit 18% of the manmade greenhouse gases into the environment and have consumers calling for changes in livestock production and reduction of beef cattle numbers.

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Strong Demand, Leverage Shift Adds Optimism for Year Ahead

Strong Demand, Leverage Shift Adds Optimism for Year Ahead

Drovers

Beef demand is strong and with U.S. cattle numbers plateauing, prices are likely to be stronger in the year ahead as consumers at home and abroad support industry profitability. That was the message delivered during the popular CattleFax outlook session, held as part of the 2020 Cattle Industry Convention in San Antonio, Texas.

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Cattle ‘upcycle’ by eating plants inedible to humans

Cattle ‘upcycle’ by eating plants inedible to humans

Martha Blum

AgriNews

Cattle are upcyclers that eat plants inedible to humans and turn them into high quality food for people. “Upcycling is taking something that has little or no value and making it a higher value product,” said Sara Place, chief sustainability officer for Elanco. “That’s what ruminants do every day because they’re consuming things we can’t eat directly and the land they’re using is not in competition with crop production either.”

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Precision Grazing Technology

Precision Grazing Technology

Troy Smith

Angus Beef Bulletin

How much forage for grazing will your ranch produce during the next grazing season? That’s a difficult question to answer because forage production can vary so much from year to year. Precipitation is a big factor. Both the amount received and when it is received matter. So does rangeland topography. Hills, valleys, slopes and swales exhibit differences in soils, moisture accumulation and plant species composition, and thus influence total forage production.

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