Daily Archives: February 26, 2019

Baxter Black, DVM: Grafting Calves

Baxter Black, DVM:  Grafting Calves

I was ugly when I was born. How ugly were you? I was so ugly they had to tie my mother’s legs together so I could nurse! If you’ve ever grafted a calf you know just what I’m talkin’ about.

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Forage-finished beef operation has consistent following from consumers.

Forage-finished beef operation has consistent following from consumers.

Becky Mills

Angus Beef Bulletin

Hedgeapple Farm isn’t the most convenient place to buy forage finished beef. It’s only open three days a week, and beef is all you’ll find. There isn’t so much as a bun in sight.

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Judicious Antibiotic Use Remains Essential to the Beef Industry

Judicious Antibiotic Use Remains Essential to the Beef Industry

Dan Thompson

Oklahoma Farm Report

It seems like various retail brands and restaurants try to outdo one another when it comes to making claims about antibiotic use or ‘no-antibiotic use’ in the meat they are selling. Dr. Dan Thomson is Professor of Production Medicine and Epidemiology at Kansas State University and in his professional opinion, he insists the industry and the consumer both need judicious use of antibiotics in animal agriculture.

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Top 5 ways to prevent and manage calf scours

Top 5 ways to prevent and manage calf scours

Dr. Bob Larson

Kansas State University

Identify sick calves as soon as possible so that you can remove them from contact with other calves and to treat them appropriately with fluids as directed by your veterinarian.

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Tips for reproductive tract repair and breeding success

Tips for reproductive tract repair and breeding success

Beef Magazine

A brood cow is the heart of the herd. She is the one that lays down each year to have a calf to ultimately propagate her outstanding genetics or help feed the world. And even though her role is considered important by all those around her, being a cow is not always a glamorous job.

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Can Bovine Vets Survive a Decline of Small Dairy and Beef Operations?

Can Bovine Vets Survive a Decline of Small Dairy and Beef Operations?

Portia Stewart

Bovine Veterinarian

The Wisconsin Department of Dairy, Trade and Consumer Protection reported the loss of 691 dairies in 2018—a calendar year loss of 7.9%, according to recent reporting from milkbusiness.com. And the beef market has also experienced declines in small cow-calf and feedlot operations—a scary proposition, as 2012 Census of Agriculture data reported 91.4% of cattle operations have fewer than 100 cows, and they account for about 46% of cows in the U.S.

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2019 Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame: James Herring, A Visionary Leader

2019 Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame: James Herring, A Visionary Leader

Greg Henderson

Drovers

Building a vertically-aligned production system connecting cattlemen with consumers to provide a superior beef eating experience was James Herring’s vision. Today, through that vision, Friona Industries, the company Herring led for a quarter-century, operates six state-of-the-art feedyards that supply 1.3 million process-verified cattle per year to Cargill Meat Solutions for branded products sold to seven retailers in nearly 3,000 U.S. stores.

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Difference between a farmer and a rancher

Difference between a farmer and a rancher

Erica Louder

Progressive Forage

What is the difference between a farmer and a rancher? The answer may seem obvious – the farmer raises crops, and the rancher raises cattle. But here in southern Idaho, the line separating the two is pretty blurry.

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Good Biosecurity Doesn’t Have to Mean a Lockdown

Good Biosecurity Doesn’t Have to Mean a Lockdown

Victoria G. Myers

Progressive Farmer

For a cattle operation, risk is an everyday part of the job. But, taking a biological risk with the health of the cow herd is like risking the foundation upon which the whole business is built. Tragedy can hit, and it can hit fast. Biosecurity is about managing that risk and limiting any loss.

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Bureau of Land Management lowers grazing fees to federal minimum for western ranchers

Bureau of Land Management lowers grazing fees to federal minimum for western ranchers

Adrian C Hedden

Carlsbad Current-Argus

Fees charged to ranchers grazing on federal land were lowered to the minimum prescribed by federal law at $1.35 per head.  The decrease marks a 6 cent drop from last year’s monthly federal grazing fees of $1.41 per animal month (AUM) and head month (HM), per a news release from the federal Bureau of Land Management – an arm of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

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