Daily Archives: January 23, 2019

Mark Parker: The Top 10 coolest things about being a farmer

Mark Parker: The Top 10 coolest things about being a farmer

FarmTalk

  1. Your accountant thinks you have a great sense of humor.
  2. He can honk all he wants — the guy in the BMW isn’t getting by your combine.

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Livestock Marketeers induct 3 into Hall of Fame

Livestock Marketeers induct 3 into Hall of Fame

The Fence Post

The Livestock Marketeers, an informal fraternity of livestock fieldmen, auctioneers, sale managers and related livestock business leaders met for their 54th Annual Banquet at the National Western Club on Jan. 19. The event was hosted by American Live Stock; master of ceremonies was J. Neil Orth, executive vice president of the American-International Charolais Association and 1984 Hall of Fame inductee.

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Cancer Eye is Heritable, but Treatable

Cancer Eye is Heritable, but Treatable

Dr. Ken McMillan
DTN

The third eyelid is an extra “lid” all nonprimate mammals have. It’s on the lower inside of the eye and can move from that point diagonally upward. It helps keep the cornea clean (think “windshield washer”), produces tears, contains lymphoid tissue that produce antibodies to fight infection and protects the cornea from injury. It’s also a common site, along with the lids and the globe, for cancer eye.

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Make sure your calving barn doesn’t carry a host of infections and diseases

Make sure your calving barn doesn’t carry a host of infections and diseases

Shannon Williams

Progressive Cattleman

Calving season is the beginning of our 2019 cash flow. Healthy calves on the ground lead to more cash in your pocket, while disease problems in the calving barn lead to increased expenses and less cash in your pocket. Implementing some biosecurity measures decreases the chances of your calving barn becoming a disease laboratory.

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Take these steps for better livestock grazing in 2019.

Take these steps for better livestock grazing in 2019.

Jim Gerrish

Angus Beef Bulletin

Droughts, wildfires, hurricanes, and floods — these are just a few of the challenges livestock producers across the country faced in 2018. Looking ahead, it’s not easy to predict what will happen in the coming new year. Even the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which regularly issues long-range forecasts, admits the probabilities their models suggest are not guaranteed.

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More women returning to the farm in management roles

More women returning to the farm in management roles

On the Farm Radio

Knowing that women approach business with different priorities can help farm and ranch families maximize their effectiveness in management roles.

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Feeding Beef Cattle Cull Onions

Feeding Beef Cattle Cull Onions

Sergio Arispe

Farms.com

Oregon is a domestic leader in storage onion production and Malheur and Morrow counties lead production within the state. Historically, onion producers have experienced difficulties disposing of cull onions, which are damaged onions that cannot be sold for human consumption. They are problematic because they attract an onion maggot fly that results in economic losses.

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Missing market reports now could mean trouble later

Missing market reports now could mean trouble later

Carrie Veselka

Progressive Catteman

As the partial government shutdown completes its fourth week, the gaps left by many government agencies whose responsibilities are left unattended until further notice are starting to show. One of the most far-reaching concerns is the livestock market reports usually provided by the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service and the National Agricultural Statistics Service.

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Spread between cattle and retail beef prices highest in history

Spread between cattle and retail beef prices highest in history

Bill Bullard

TriState Livestock News

A recent news release posted on a website bearing the Beef Checkoff Logo and titled, “Beef Demand . . . It’s Been A Very Good Year” states that “2018 retail beef demand is 15 percent higher than in January 2012.”

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Bovine tuberculosis in ND — What to look out for

Bovine tuberculosis in ND — What to look out for

Inforum

The outbreak at a small Sargent County family cattle operation is the first time this particular strain of the disease has been identified in the United States, and was first reported after lesions were discovered on two older beef cows at slaughter plants in South Dakota and Minnesota. The strain is usually found in Mexican cattle.

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