Daily Archives: June 11, 2018

Suckling Calf Implants Add Value to Cow-Calf Operations

Suckling Calf Implants Add Value to Cow-Calf Operations

Chandra Engel

iGrow

Cow-calf pairs are getting moved to green grass and it is a good feeling to see them out grazing. While weaning may be a ways off, calf growth that leads to excellent calf weaning weights is a major goal of this phase of the cow-calf business. If someone asked you to give them $1.50 per steer calf at spring turn out, in return, for every 37 head (your cost is $56), they will give you an additional 550 lb steer calf at weaning.

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You Can’t Stop This Two-legged Ranch Dog From Working the Herd

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You Can’t Stop This Two-legged Ranch Dog From Working the Herd

Sara Brown

Drovers

The hardest working employee on this farm does his job with a happy smile, a wagging tail and a huge heart. Patton, a two-legged blue heeler dog, takes his job running cattle seriously.

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Are May’s cattle market dynamics a crystal ball for the rest of the summer

Are May’s cattle market dynamics a crystal ball for the rest of the summer

Nevil Speer

Beef Magazine

Sometimes the market will make you scratch your head wondering what just occurred. And sometimes, it all seems logical and straightforward. May turned out to be the latter. That is, the fed market behaved largely as expected.

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A Chinese trade war isn’t beef’s biggest problem

A Chinese trade war isn’t beef’s biggest problem

Alan Newport

Beef Producer

When President Donald Trump announced tariffs of about $60 billion on Chinese imports to the US in March, a howl rose from the ag community. China retaliated with a list of 128 US products, then added a list of 106 more things subject to a 25% tariff. Beef was on that list.

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Cattle Nutrition 101

Cattle Nutrition 101

Biozyme

Consistency is key when feeding both steers and heifers. Typically, you feed morning and night and want close to 12 hours between those feedings. Hot weather during the summer can decrease appetite, so it is beneficial to feed early in the morning and later in the evening.

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FAO Affirms Cattle’s Critical Role as Upcycler

FAO Affirms Cattle’s Critical Role as Upcycler

Sara Place, Ph.D.

Medium.com

Livestock, especially ruminants like beef cattle, play a key role in a sustainable food system. They allow us to produce food on marginal lands that are unsuitable for cultivated agriculture. Cattle act as “upcyclers” in our food system — they upgrade plants into high quality protein for people.

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Learn before you look for poison hemlock.

Learn before you look for poison hemlock.

Angus Beef Bulletin Extra

Now that spring has finally arrived, University of Minnesota Extension is asking people to be on the lookout for poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), but they’ll need information before they take any action. As its name implies, the invasive plant is highly toxic — even fatal — to humans and animals.

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Quality Is Paramount for Snyder County Beef Farmers

Quality Is Paramount for Snyder County Beef Farmers

Tabitha Goodling

Lancaster Farming

Their Ste-Wan Farms in Snyder County was named Pennsylvania’s Cattle Feeder Farm of the Year in April. Their 60 cows are pure Simmental, bred through artificial insemination with top bulls. “We use them for show calves, and what is not shown we finish,” Steve said, adding, “we’re all about genetics.”

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Grazing Cattle on High-Value Land

Grazing Cattle on High-Value Land

Golden West Radio

“Fencing has changed dramatically in the last few years with the advent of electric fencing and better fencers for high power, so making use of high tensile electric fence, innovative fence posts, and the high power fencers will make fencing, building the fence and then moving the fence effectively much easier.”

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Ohlendorf: Baseball pitcher by day, Longhorn rancher by night

Ohlendorf: Baseball pitcher by day, Longhorn rancher by night

Ann Hess

Ag Daily

When he’s not throwing his old-school windup or hurling a four-seam fastball from the mound, American professional pitcher Ross Ohlendorf is ranching. “You can say it is in my blood. Our family has been farming and ranching in Texas since coming over from Germany in the 1830s,” Ohlendorf said. “I grew up in Austin, but visited my grandparents most weekends on the farm where my dad grew up. I also spent a lot of summer days out there.”

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