Daily Archives: May 16, 2018

Correcting a Malpresentation:  Tips for pushing a calf back into the uterus.

Correcting a Malpresentation:  Tips for pushing a calf back into the uterus.

Heather Smith Thomas

Angus Beef Bulletin Extra

In some dystocia situations the calf is not entering the birth canal properly, and cannot be born until you push it back into the uterus to reposition it. When you put your hand and arm into the cow, this stimulates her to strain and push everything against you. If you push hardest during the moments she’s not straining, and just try to hold ground as she strains, it will be easier.

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Cutting Height in Hay Fields: How Low Can You Go?

Cutting Height in Hay Fields: How Low Can You Go?

Dwane Miller

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

While many parts of Pennsylvania have yet to take a cutting of hay in 2018, I was on a farm in Chester County on Monday (5/7/18) where first cutting alfalfa/orchardgrass was made last week. As you head to the field this year, it’s important to pay attention to cutting height in your hay crop. One of our goals as farmers is to maximize our yield; however, cutting a hay crop too low can lead to several negative issues.

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Hard-Headed Calves

Hard-Headed Calves

Dr. Ken McMillan
DTN

Calves, especially when they get old enough to become “independent of mama,” can make herding cattle difficult at best. The rules often just don’t seem to apply to them—kind of like teenagers.

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How truck scales help control feed costs

How truck scales help control feed costs

Keith Sather

Progressive Dairyman

When trying to cut feed costs, where should you focus your energy? Trying to get a better deal on a particular feed ingredient isn’t likely to produce the results you’re looking for. For example, let’s say you convince your soybean meal supplier to come down $10 per ton. You would only save about three cents per cow per day.

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Farmers reap benefits of cover crops with better soil

Farmers reap benefits of cover crops with better soil

Karen Caffarini

Chicago Post Tribune

As area farmers Keith Gustafson and Dan Sutton plant their corn and soybean fields this spring, they know work they did last fall will help increase this year’s yield, control erosion and improve water quality, among other benefits.

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Researchers awarded USDA grant to study the effects of diet on cattle fertility

Researchers awarded USDA grant to study the effects of diet on cattle fertility

Jenny Lavey
Farm Forum

How much a cow eats while she’s pregnant can impact the development of her calf’s brain, as well as the calf’s future ability to reproduce, according to two Montana State University animal physiologists.

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Gassy cows? Facts about beef’s carbon emissions

Gassy cows? Facts about beef’s carbon emissions

Sara Place

Green Biz

Let’s clear the air on something up front. All those “cow farts” you’ve heard about? It’s actually cow burps. Having spent much of my life around cows and conducting research measuring methane emissions from cattle (I’m sure most readers are jealous), I can confirm the vast majority of methane emissions emanating from cattle come out the front end. Also, despite the sensory experience “gassy cows” may evoke, methane itself is an odorless gas.

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