Monthly Archives: April 2018

Tools for evaluating genetic selection success

Tools for evaluating genetic selection success

ERIC MOUSEL

Prairie Star

When evaluating the end point of a breeding program, the operator needs to look at whether they sell weaned calves or background calves, retain replacement heifers, retain calves in the feed yard or finish themselves, or retain through slaughter, etc. The economically relevant traits that should be selected for will largely be determined by this end point.

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Getting First-Calf Heifers Rebred on Time

Getting First-Calf Heifers Rebred on Time

Heather Smith Thomas

Hereford World

It can be a challenge to get first-calf heifers rebred without losing ground. They often calve later the following year or come up open. The two-year-old is nursing a calf, still growing and needs good nutrition and body condition to cycle on schedule after calving. Two-year-olds need more care and management than mature cows.

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Beef baleage

Beef baleage

Lauren Peterson

Hay and Forage Grower

Baleage is ensiled at 40 to 60 percent moisture, while dry hay commonly is stored below 20 percent moisture and silage above 65 percent, explains Kim Mullenix, beef cattle systems extension specialist with Auburn University in its Timely Information animal sciences series. Its use is becoming more widespread as producers strive for higher quality forage and cut down wilting time.

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Grazing Around Streams – More Ways To Do The Right Thing

Grazing Around Streams – More Ways To Do The Right Thing

Troy Bishopp

On Pasture

We can graze around streams and avoid government regulations if we choose to do the right thing. Troy Bishopp is busy collecting examples and sharing them with On Pasture so our community can be a good example to all graziers.

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Umbilical Hernias in Calves

Umbilical Hernias in Calves

Dr. Ken McMillan
DTN

There are times when umbilical hernias in calves call for surgical corrections.

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The math behind animal nutrition lingo

The math behind animal nutrition lingo

John McKinnon

Canadian Cattleman

When I visit with producers about their feeding program, I often get questions on “nutrition lingo.” Examples include questions on the meaning of a mineral or protein supplement tag or how much supplement do you need to feed to achieve an ionophore concentration of 22 or 33 ppm?

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Dewormers – Are They An Extremely Valuable Non-Renewable Resources?

Dewormers – Are They An Extremely Valuable Non-Renewable Resources?

Michelle Arnold

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

A “non-renewable” resource is a resource with economic value that cannot be readily replaced on a level equal to its consumption. Petroleum and coal are two familiar examples of valuable non-renewable products used daily but known to exist in limited supply, and formation of new product takes billions of years. Dewormers, on the other hand, are products that can be purchased from almost any farm or veterinary supply store and online.

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Farmers step up to help Wisconsin family after silo collapse

Farmers step up to help Wisconsin family after silo collapse

Ag Daily

When a tragic silo accident took the lives of a Wisconsin father and son last month, the ag community near and far stepped up to help. In late March, Dan Briel and his boys Caleb and David were cleaning the inside of a silo on their family farm. While inside, the silage collapsed in on them.

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Drought and wildfires force cattle ranchers in Colorado, four other states to scramble for feed

Drought and wildfires force cattle ranchers in Colorado, four other states to scramble for feed

Ken Miller

The Denver Post

Ongoing drought and wildfires have cattle ranchers in at least five Southwestern U.S. states scrambling for hay or pastureland, while others are selling off some of their herds.

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Mycotoxins: Testing and Surveillance to Reduce Risk

Mycotoxins: Testing and Surveillance to Reduce Risk

John Maday

Drovers

Mycotoxins represent a broad category of toxic agents produced by various naturally occurring fungi, mostly soil borne and environmentally dependent. Three types – aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone – cause most mycotoxins in cattle, says Jim Simpson, a consulting beef cattle nutritionist who operates Simpson Nutritional Services, LLC, based in Canyon, Texas.

 

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Mark Parker:  The Top 10 advantages of a bad bull

Mark Parker:  The Top 10 advantages of a bad bull

FarmTalk

  1. Settling only half the cows is a big plus in a dry year.
  2. He’s a cheap-keeper since half of the grass he eats is over at the neighbor’s.

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Lower-Profit Operations Have Some Things in Common

Lower-Profit Operations Have Some Things in Common

Victoria Myers

Progressive Farmer

A recent study out of Kansas State University sifted through reams of data and found that when comparing 61 different commercial cow/calf operations over a 5—year period, there were some commonalities among those businesses that made money, and didn’t, regardless of the revenue side of the equation.

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Red Angus Association Releases Two New EPDs Aimed at Increasing Efficiency

Red Angus Association Releases Two New EPDs Aimed at Increasing Efficiency

Beef producers consistently look toward the horizon for new tools to help them improve their bottom line. The Red Angus Association of America has a long history of supporting commercial cattlemen and women who are dedicated to efficiently producing high-quality beef. The recent release of two new Red Angus EPDs, targeted at providing producers with additional selection tools to meet their goals, exemplifies this effort.

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Lives, Livestock, Homes Lost to Oklahoma Wildfires

Lives, Livestock, Homes Lost to Oklahoma Wildfires

Russ Quinn

DTN

Two large wildfires continue to burn in parts of northwest Oklahoma, fueled by dry conditions, high winds and low humidity. Though the winds had let up some by Friday, allowing firefighters to contain more of the fires, the blazes have already killed at least two people and have burned thousands of acres of land and destroyed several homes and ranches.

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Cattle management decisions you can’t afford to ignore

Cattle management decisions you can’t afford to ignore

Beef Magazine

The increasingly transparent market with buyers tracking results by source underscores that producing high-quality beef takes a systematic approach no one segment can afford to ignore. Ever.

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Myth:  Going Meatless One Day A Week Can Have A Significant Environmental Impact

Myth:  Going Meatless One Day A Week Can Have A Significant Environmental Impact

Meat Myth Crushers

The data shows that reducing meat consumption one day per week as recommended by the Meatless Monday campaign has a negligible impact on greenhouse gas emissions. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), just 3.4 percent of greenhouse gas emissions are from livestock agriculture, with beef contributing 1.4 percent.

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American Hereford Association to Release “Maternal Advantage” Program Benefitting Commercial Cattlemen

American Hereford Association to Release “Maternal Advantage” Program Benefitting Commercial Cattlemen

This new female-focused program is designed to take advantage of hybrid vigor by capitalizing on Hereford genetics. It has been documented that Hereford genetics maximize the value of a herd by leveraging its fertility, feed efficiency, profitability and docility to the producer’s advantage.

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Is it Profitable to Add Weight and Sell Heavier Feeder Calves?

Is it Profitable to Add Weight and Sell Heavier Feeder Calves?

Chris Prevatt

Drovers

The feeder calves with the greatest value are almost always the heavier calves. The question that producers must answer for themselves is “Will it be profitable to add the additional weight and sell heavier feeder calves?” They can accomplish this by calculating the value of gain of their feeder calves.

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Student loans an obstacle for many young farmers

Student loans an obstacle for many young farmers

Nella Mae Parks

Small Ag Press

It has been said the best way to get into farming is to “marry it or inherit it.” The risks are many and obstacles to entry are age-old — access to land, water, markets and capital. But regardless of whether new farmers married it, inherited it, or neither, one new barrier becoming increasingly problematic is student loan debt, according to the National Young Farmers Coalition.

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Measure & Improve Beef

Measure & Improve Beef

Farms.com

Roy Smith, a farmer and grain marketing consultant from Plattsmouth, Nebraska, talks about why farmers should consider marketing new and old crop in April and May.

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