Daily Archives: March 28, 2018

Mark Parker:  The Top 10 things that get a farmer grouchy

Mark Parker:  The Top 10 things that get a farmer grouchy

FarmTalk

  1. The first calves of the season look suspiciously like the neighbor’s fence-jumping, ex-bucket calf, bull of undetermined heritage.

Full Story

Determine Estrous Response to Optimize Artificial Insemination Costs

Determine Estrous Response to Optimize Artificial Insemination Costs

Sandy Johnson

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

For an increasing number of producers, artificial insemination (AI) and estrus synchronization are tools that help them reach their production goals and allow them to take advantage of genetic choices only available through AI. Reduced risk of calving difficulty from use of high accuracy calving ease sires on replacement heifers is a great advantage to AI users.

Full Story

Training Cows to Eat Weeds – Even in Very Large Pastures

Training Cows to Eat Weeds – Even in Very Large Pastures

Kathy Voth

On Pasture

It’s that time of year again when those special forbs start poking their heads up in your grassy pastures. That means it’s also the time of year when I remind you, “Those are not weeds. That is good forage!” And then I remind you that it only takes 8 hours spread over 7 days to teach your cows to eat them. Will this be the year you try it out?

Full Story

Breed composition: it’s like chocolates you can’t tell what’s inside just by looking at them

Breed composition: it’s like chocolates you can’t tell what’s inside just by looking at them

Tamar Crum, Jared E. Decker, Robert D. Schnabel, and Jeremy F. Taylor

A Steak in Genomics™

You may be wondering how in the world does a box of chocolates relate to breed composition of livestock? Or, if you are anything like me, it’s where did I hide that Halloween chocolate, I need some! I think that there are two analogies between a box of chocolates and the breed composition of livestock.

Full Story

Boot The Hay Habit

Boot The Hay Habit

Becky Mills

DTN

If you want proof Keith Tuck’s rotational-grazing system works, take a look at his hay equipment. Oh, wait. It’s gone. He sold it in 2016. “It was a hard decision to make,” the Moneta, Virginia, cattleman, admits. “My hay equipment sat there for two years before I took the plunge. But, it is a whole lot easier and less stressful.”

Full Story

Kansas State University works to help cattle producers be as efficient as possible

Kansas State University works to help cattle producers be as efficient as possible

Amy Bickel

High Plains Journal

The view has changed in 145 years, since the first structure was built on a sprawling and open Kansas State University campus to teach students how to care for, breed and market livestock.

Full Story

Choosing Mineral Supplements Can Be Overwhelming

Choosing Mineral Supplements Can Be Overwhelming
Dr. Brandi Bourg Karisch
Cattle Today
With so many options available to offer a mineral supplement, many cattle producers often get overwhelmed at the feed counter.

Full Story

Farmers told they are getting beat; need to adapt tactics used by vegans

Farmers told they are getting beat; need to adapt tactics used by vegans

On the Farm Radio

When it comes to forming opinions on food, today’s consumers are at least a little confused, noted Dr. Paige Pratt, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation grassroots development specialist. “Products today are labeled and labeled and labeled,” Pratt told workshop participants at the 2018 VFBF Women’s Spring Conference March 17.

Full Story

Control External Parasites, Prevent Disease

Control External Parasites, Prevent Disease

Lori Hays

Drovers

Flies, ticks and other external parasites on cattle cause stress, reduce weight gains and transmit disease such as pinkeye and anaplasmosis. This is not breaking news, but with antibiotic use coming under increasing scrutiny and regulatory action, producers can benefit by focusing more on parasite control and less on medicated feeds for dealing with diseases.

Full Story

Understanding Maternal Behavior Helps In Bonding

Understanding Maternal Behavior Helps In Bonding

Heather Smith Thomas

Beef Magazine

The bonding process is how a cow identifies her new calf and commits to caring for and protecting it. It’s a complex blend of hormonal-induced and learned behavior.

Full Story