Daily Archives: January 11, 2018

Cud chewing helps keep the rumen from becoming too acidic.

Cud chewing helps keep the rumen from becoming too acidic.

Dr. Ken McMillan

DTN

Cud chewing is an essential part of what makes a ruminant a ruminant. The rumen is this giant fermentation vat where microorganisms break down parts of forages that simple-stomached animals can’t digest. These microorganisms also allow ruminants to utilize nonprotein nitrogen (urea) to manufacture protein.

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K-State Presents 10th Annual Youth Animal Science Learning Opportunity

K-State Presents 10th Annual Youth Animal Science Learning Opportunity

Students from across the country with an interest in the livestock industry and related careers can apply now for the Kansas State University Animal Sciences Leadership Academy. The academy, which is celebrating its 10th year, is an intensive four-day educational experience designed to enhance the leadership skills and animal science knowledge of students in ninth through 12th grades.

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Efficiency and cow-calf production

Efficiency and cow-calf production

Derrell S. Peel

FarmTalk

Cow-calf producers use a variety of efficiency measures to help manage production systems. Many of these are technical efficiencies that capture physical measures of output and input use and range from very specific measures to more broad-based values that incorporate a range of production components. For example, pregnancy percentage focuses on breeding efficiency and highlights management of cow body condition and can indicate reproductive failures in cows and bulls.

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Meet the Woman Using CRISPR to Breed All-Male “Terminator Cattle”

Meet the Woman Using CRISPR to Breed All-Male “Terminator Cattle”

Andrew Rosenblum

Technology Review

A graduate student was waiting for Alison Van Eenennaam in the doorway of her lab at the University of California, Davis. An Australian geneticist, she spends days on the road arguing with critics of Monsanto’s GM soybeans, appearing in documentaries, and telling the public why genetic modification is safe.

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Scientists Develop a Hornless Cow Through Gene Editing

Scientists Develop a Hornless Cow Through Gene Editing

Ira Flatow

Science Friday

Well, researchers at the University of California, Davis, UC Davis, tackled this problem, came up with a novel way to remove the horns without actually cutting them off. Instead, they prevented them from growing in the first place by using gene editing. They swapped a gene from a naturally hornless breed, inserted it into the genome of dairy bulls.

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Open Season Is Seen in Gene Editing of Animals

Open Season Is Seen in Gene Editing of Animals

Amy Harmon

New York Times

Other than the few small luxuries afforded them, like private access to a large patch of grass, there was nothing to mark the two hornless dairy calves born last spring at a breeding facility here as early specimens in a new era of humanity’s dominion over nature.

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FDA Approved Free-Choice Feeding Options for Anaplasmosis Control in Cattle

FDA Approved Free-Choice Feeding Options for Anaplasmosis Control in Cattle

FDA.gov

In January 2017, the FDA and animal drug sponsors completed the voluntary transition of antimicrobial drugs of medical importance used in animal feed to Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) marketing status under Guidance for Industry (GFI) #213. As these medically important antimicrobial drugs have come under veterinary oversight, FDA has received questions from some stakeholders relating to the use of chlortetracycline (CTC) for control of active infection of anaplasmosis in cattle.

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