Daily Archives: July 14, 2017

The Beef RoundTable: Picking up the pieces: How ranchers can deal with the emotional after-effects of natural disasters

The weather is a significant factor for those who make their living from the land. And when the weather turns violent, it can leave emotional scars every bit as deep as the damage it does to livestock, barns, houses and working facilities. In the second of a three-part series, the Beef Roundtable looks at how ranchers can help each other and themselves deal with the emotional after-effects of nature’s violent side.

BeefTalk: A Beef Cow is What She Eats

BeefTalk: A Beef Cow is What She Eats

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

Droughts are not new. I remember Dad recounting the 1930s and the experiences Grandpa had. Hay, or any feed, was scarce, and cows survived eating thistle (I expect Russian thistle) mixed with a fair bit of kochia. Dad’s only comment was to be sure to jump away when the cows lifted their tails. Most cows at that time were stanchioned, and a walk behind the cows meant one was in firing range. A direct hit meant a smelly trip to the house, and modern showers and water were not available until the next rain.

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Too Cold, Too Hot, or Just Right …

Too Cold, Too Hot, or Just Right …

Progressive Cattleman

Producers have recognized for years they must feed a certain amount of fiber in their mixed rations even though there is no actual dietary fiber requirement for cattle. Selecting the optimal amount of fiber depends on your production goals and can be compared to the way Goldilocks picked the best porridge from the Three Bears table

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Grazing Height Determines the Health of Your Forages

Grazing Height Determines the Health of Your Forages

Paige Smart

On Pasture

As livestock producers, you know very well how forages will impact the growth or productivity of your animals. However, we very seldom think of how our livestock will impact the growth and productivity of our forages. Understanding the impact that grazing or cutting will have on the pasture is critical to achieving stand longevity, productivity, and quality.

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Priming the Calf Immune System for the Challenges Ahead

Priming the Calf Immune System for the Challenges Ahead

Justin Kieffer, DVM

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Now that calving is completed, the days are longer, and the grass is growing (hopefully), it is time to start preparing for the weaning and eventual sale or feedlot finishing of your calf crop and development of your replacement females. Once the cow calf pairs have been kicked out to pasture in the spring, there is a tendency to put off or ignore the steps needed not only to set the feedlot calf up for success, but also to lay the groundwork for proper health for your new heifers.

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Bigger cattle require better facility design

Bigger cattle require better facility design

Janelle Atyeo

Tri-State Neighbor

Today’s cattle are bred bigger than they were a few decades ago, and that means their living spaces need to be built to handle the bulk. Big cattle need plenty of room. The exact amount of recommended space per animal varies by the type of feed yard. Kris Kohl, Iowa State University Extension agricultural engineer, gave a rundown of stocking density guidelines at a cattle stewardship seminar at the Dickinson County Fairgrounds in Spirit Lake last month.

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A new era in beef cattle genetics

A new era in beef cattle genetics

Troy Marshall

Beef Magazine

Those who thought science would eventually lead to a simple, straightforward and universally accepted approach that would bring amazing clarity to genetic selection were terribly wrong. Or maybe we are just going to see a lot of upheaval on our journey to get there.

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