Daily Archives: May 31, 2017

Baxter Black, DVM: The Grapevine

Baxter Black, DVM:  The Grapevine

What better way to impress his new lady friend, thought Rob, than to take her to his friend’s rancho for an afternoon branding and BBQ? 

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The Cost of Late Calvers

The Cost of Late Calvers

Heather Gessner

iGrow

Pounds of beef sold is a key number for cattlemen. Late calvers the cows that drag out the calving season, may cost producers more than extra work and management, they may actually be costing dollars.

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Steer Clear of Foot Rot

Steer Clear of Foot Rot

Dr. Ken McMillan

DTN

Prevention of foot rot should focus on limiting exposure to muddy areas for extended periods of time and minimizing contact with rough, rocky areas or coarse, cutover land — especially in the warmer times of the year. Good nutrition is especially important.

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Why it’s important to protect calf health prior to birth

Why it’s important to protect calf health prior to birth

Beef Magazine

Herd health is important for a couple of reasons. And many producers vaccinate their calves at branding and weaning. But have you considered vaccinating your calves before they’re born?

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Will your next load of hay arrive by Uber Freight?

Will your next load of hay arrive by Uber Freight?

Lynn Jaynes

Progressive Forage

It was only a matter of time. Uber has extended its services from the taxi division to include truck freight, via an app on your smartphone. The service, launched mid-May, connects truck drivers with long-haul opportunities. Truckers licensed as authorized carriers with a Motor Carrier or DOT number can submit an application to the company as a carrier.

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Humanely Raised Beef 101

Humanely Raised Beef 101

Farming Magazine

Food that is “humanely raised” is in high demand, according to recent literature from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Services. The publication reported that 51 percent of consumers indicate that humanely raised food is important or very important when weighing purchasing decisions. The report also found that 68 percent of respondents want to learn how farmers maintain animals while they’re being raised.

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Which U.S. Beef will China Accept?

Which U.S. Beef will China Accept?

Northern AG

The United States has so far been able to negotiate favorable terms of the broad agreement between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping earlier this month regarding opening China’s market to U.S. beef, according to USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agriculture Services Jason Hafemeister.

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USDA revises Angus certification requirements

USDA revises Angus certification requirements

AgNewsFeed

USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has announced that the agency is revising the live animal specification used for all Angus certified programs to reflect evolving cattle genetics and marketing. Proposed to take effect July 1, the revised specifications, for phenotypic evaluations, require that cattle have a main body that is solid black with no color behind the shoulder, above the flanks, or breaking the midline behind the shoulder (excluding the tail.)

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Better beef leads to value gain

Better beef leads to value gain

Steve Suther

Business Farmer

When cattle gain or lose $150 in per-head value in a week, it’s easy to lose sight of what lifts that value trend over the years. A University of Missouri study of 2003-’16 boxed-beef cutout values isolates the contribution of branded and Prime sales.

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Fall Calving Season May Yield Higher Returns for Southeastern Beef Producers

Fall Calving Season May Yield Higher Returns for Southeastern Beef Producers

Lauren Neale

Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association

The vast majority of cow-calf producers in Tennessee and the Southeast using a defined calving season have long favored spring calving; however, researchers at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have evaluated the risk and returns for a fall calving season, proving once again that timing is everything.

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