Daily Archives: May 12, 2016

Consider Pros and Cons Before Creep Feeding

Consider Pros and Cons Before Creep Feeding

Stephen B. Blezinger, Ph.D., PAS

Cattle Today

Creep feeding of calves while still on the cow has been a management tool used for years by the cow-calf producer. The value and profitability of this practice has been long debated as well.

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Though uncommon, pneumonia can affect adult cows

Though uncommon, pneumonia can affect adult cows

Gabe Middleton, DVM

Bovine Veterinarian

Pneumonia is fairly uncommon in adult dairy cows due, in part, to adequate ventilation in facilities, vaccination protocols and the more competent immune function of adult cows versus calves. There are, however, some scenarios where pneumonia can become a serious problem in adult cows.

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Dr. Joe Paschal Talks Tips for Choosing the Right Cattle Breed for Your Operation

Dr. Joe Paschal Talks Tips for Choosing the Right Cattle Breed for Your Operation

Oklahoma Farm Report

Environment, production practices and goals all play into one of the most-asked questions in ranching: “What breed of cattle should I raise? Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Livestock Specialist Dr. Joe Paschal talked about the options – ranging from the purebred business to commercial crossbred cattle – during the TSCRA Convention’s School for Successful Ranching last month.

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Post-breeding nutrition: Monitor feed to improve heifer preg rates

Post-breeding nutrition: Monitor feed to improve heifer preg rates

Bryan Nichols

The Cattle Business Weekly

Heifer breeding season is fast approaching. Achieving a desirable pregnancy rate in replacement heifers is contingent upon many things, but it all begins with nutrition. The majority of articles discussing heifer nutrition focus on the pre-breeding phase and address the desired body weight and condition at breeding.

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Efficiency Starts at Home

Efficiency Starts at Home

Boyd Kidwell

Progressive Farmer

With 750 cows to take care of, Rodney Walker, of Delta, Alabama, needs to save time and labor any way possible. Walker’s time-saving plan begins the day a calf is born.

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Designing a trichomoniasis control plan

Designing a trichomoniasis control plan

Dr. Bob Larson

Angus Journal

Trichomoniasis (trich) is a highly contagious disease that can cause cows to abort an early pregnancy when the organism is passed from infected bulls to cows during mating. This disease is very important to the cattle industry because infected herds experience very severe losses — commonly up to a 30% to 50% reduction in the number of cows calving.

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Legume bloat problems killing cattle in southwest Missouri

Legume bloat problems killing cattle in southwest Missouri

David Burton

Progressive Cattleman

There has been an unusually high number of bloat problems among cattle in southwest Missouri over the last two or three weeks. According to Eldon Cole, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension, several cattle deaths have occurred.

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Washy pastures need supplemented with dry matter, fiber, and energy.

Washy pastures need supplemented with dry matter, fiber, and energy.

Travis Meteer

University of Illinois

During the winter season most cattle are supplemented with dry forages, grains, and co-products. This ration is balanced and delivered to cattle. Then spring comes along and cattle are put out to grass.

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Farmers take first look at Trump v. Clinton

Farmers take first look at Trump v. Clinton

Ben Potter

Drovers

Who does farm country favor? The latest Farm Journal Pulse wanted to know. More than 2,000 farmers weighed in on the hot-button issue with the highest Pulse response rate to-date. The results have Trump winning in a landslide, but the data reveals some other interesting insights.

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‘Slobbers’ alert issued by MU for pastures with excess clover

‘Slobbers’ alert issued by MU for pastures with excess clover

Craig Roberts

University of Missouri

Legumes make good additions to livestock pastures, up to a point. Too much can cause “slobbers.” “So far this has been a white clover spring; that can bring problems,” says Craig Roberts, University of Missouri Extension forage specialist. When livestock, especially horses, eat too much of the small legume it brings on excessive saliva.

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