Daily Archives: September 11, 2015

Do you earn premiums or avoid discounts when selling feeder cattle?

Do you earn premiums or avoid discounts when selling feeder cattle?

The Beef RoundTable

Beef Magazine/Purdue University

This month’s Beef Roundtable features predictions for the fall cattle market and whether or not preconditioning your calves will pay a premium. Guests are Jackie Moore with Joplin Regional Stockyards at Joplin, Mo. and Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing economist at Oklahoma State University.

Full Story

Angus and DNA Traceability Offers a Winning Combination

Angus and DNA Traceability Offers a Winning Combination

Oklahoma Farm Report

The Certified Angus Beef program is considered the “gold standard” when it comes to value-added beef programs in the U.S. When you add the Path Proven concept from the Performance Food Group, the nation’s first DNA-based traceability program, you come up with a real winner.

Full Story

Cut winter feed bills with a focus on forage

Cut winter feed bills with a focus on forage

Beef Producer

If you want to cut your winter feed bill, work on stockpiling forages now, says Dr. David Fernandez, Cooperative Extension Program livestock specialist at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Think of stockpiling warm season grasses as making hay without cutting and baling it. The grass will cure naturally in the field, and the livestock can eat it where it grows.

Full Story

BeefTalk: Cost of Beef Production Up 200 Percent

BeefTalk: Cost of Beef Production Up 200 Percent

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

Are you sitting down? Data show beef production is becoming expensive. I am not referring to the end product but rather to the weaned calf. The cost per pound weaned per exposed cow has jumped 200 percent since the turn of the century. That is not good news. Cost control is critical in every business. If costs are allowed to run out of control, the next step is liquidation.

Full Story

How to make alternative cattle feed work on your ranch

How to make alternative cattle feed work on your ranch

Heather Smith Thomas

BEEF

Cattle can eat most anything. And that’s good, because there are alternative feeds that have adequate nutrition to use as a winter supplement and can help lower input costs as well.

Full Story

Setting Up an Intensive Grazing System That Works – Pasture Recovery Periods

Setting Up an Intensive Grazing System That Works – Pasture Recovery Periods

Dave Scott

On Pasture

In some ways, managing an irrigated intensive grazing system is a snap. There is no leapfrogging from one paddock over another and then back again to compensate for varying soil water holding capacities. In other words, effective irrigation tames the soil-moisture wild card.

Full Story

The beef producer ‘party’ isn’t over—but it’s changing

The beef producer ‘party’ isn’t over—but it’s changing

Samantha Stanbery Athey

FarmTalk

After the wild ride of the past couple years, beef producers are trying to understand the new challenges of prosperity and debating how to best prepare for the future. Cattlemen were able to get insight on these issues from university and industry professionals at this year’s Fall Cattlemen’s Seminar held Sept. 1 at the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds in Springfield, Missouri.

Full Story

Temperature Matters

Temperature Matters

Feedlot Magazine

Pharmaceutical products are valuable tools in the livestock business. A bottle of vaccine left out in the elements or kept in a refrigerator that’s too warm can render the product useless. That’s money most do not want to squirt on the ground or toss in the trash

Full Story

What’s Down the Pike for Beef Demand?

What’s Down the Pike for Beef Demand?

Diane Henderson

The Beef Board

Virtually every member of the beef community, from farm to fork, has asked that question in recent months — hopeful but hesitant to believe that the tremendous marketplace the cattle industry has enjoyed lately will continue.

Full Story

New rules concerning antibiotic uses in cattle.

New rules concerning antibiotic uses in cattle.

Bob Larson, Mike Apley

Angus Beef Bulletin

Starting in December of 2016, the ways that cattle producers will be able to use antibiotics to control and treat disease in their herds will change. During the past several years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken steps to fundamentally change how some antibiotics can be legally used in feed or water for food-producing animals.

Full Story