Daily Archives: July 15, 2015

Are ionophore antibiotics a risk for antimicrobial resistance?

Are ionophore antibiotics a risk for antimicrobial resistance?

Canadian Cattleman

Reynold Bergen

Ionophores have a very unique way of killing bacteria. The rumen has a high concentration of sodium and a lower concentration of potassium. Bacteria are the opposite; they have a high concentration of potassium and a lower concentration of sodium.

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Implementing antibiotic stewardship at the farm level

Implementing antibiotic stewardship at the farm level

Brian Lubbers

Bovine Veterinarian

As veterinarians and producers, we are playing a role in the enhancement of antimicrobial resistance. It’s out of the barn, so to speak – the risk of resistance never goes to zero. In the previous post, we looked at initiatives taking place at the industry level, but there is another role to be played by us as individuals in appropriately and judiciously administering antibiotics to animals.

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New Name for Pasteurella

New Name for Pasteurella

Dr. Ken McMillan

DTN/The Progressive Farmer

Mannheimia haemolytica is the new name for Pasteurella haemolytica. Every so often, microbiologists change the name of organisms to confuse us — or so it seems.

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Follow these five steps to keep cattle healthy in hot, humid weather

Follow these five steps to keep cattle healthy in hot, humid weather

Beef Producer

With continuing weather forecasts of temperatures in the mid- to upper 90s and the heat index topping 100 degrees in Iowa and other states across the Corn Belt this week, Iowa State University Extension beef veterinarian Grant Dewell is reminding beef cattle producers that properly preparing for these weather conditions is vital to maintaining herd health.

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Connected cattle: how health trackers could change the beef industry

Connected cattle: how health trackers could change the beef industry

Sean Buckley

Engadget

If you’ve ever road tripped across the United States, you’ve probably seen one: a feedlot, populated by hundreds (if not thousands) of cows. These animals are the lifeblood of the American beef industry, but caring for them is no small chores. Caretakers typically have to walk the fields and visually check the heard for obvious cues of sickness, heaststroke or fatigue. It’s hard, tedious work, but there are a few companies out there trying to make it easier. How? By building fitness trackers for cows, of course.

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Study shows bigger isn’t better when it comes to a young female’s development and conception rates

Study shows bigger isn’t better when it comes to a young female’s development and conception rates

Barbara Duckworth

The Western Producer

Collective wisdom says replacement heifers need to reach 60 to 65 percent of their mature body weight at the start of the breeding season. Heifers that are lighter at weaning or did not gain enough weight from weaning until breeding may not cycle at the desired time.

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Storing wet crop byproducts — it’s easier than you think

Storing wet crop byproducts — it’s easier than you think

Heather Smith Thomas

BEEF
Ever since the ethanol era changed the beef industry landscape, cattle producers in close enough proximity to an ethanol plant have had access to distiller’s grains as an alternative protein supplement. But with a consistency somewhere between muddy water and sawdust-filled wood glue, dealing with the byproduct is a challenge.

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