Daily Archives: June 29, 2015

Why science doesn’t support rotational grazing

Why science doesn’t support rotational grazing

Ben Norton

Progressive Cattleman

One of the more fascinating aspects of grazing management in recent decades has been the contrast between what scientists say about rotational grazing and what ranchers say.

Full Story

A successful artificial insemination program is the result of many separate steps done correctly.

A successful artificial insemination program is the result of many separate steps done correctly.

Warren Rusche

Beef Today

Factors such as insemination timing, semen placement, estrous detection and synchronization protocols usually receive the most focus. Semen handling is often overlooked in the discussion, but is just as important to the success or failure of AI.

Full Story

How Bad Is It When Your Curing Hay Gets Rained On in the Field?

How Bad Is It When Your Curing Hay Gets Rained On in the Field?

Krishona Martinson

On Pasture

Rain occurring while cut hay is laying in the field causes both yield and quality losses that reduce the value of the crop as an animal feed and a marketable commodity.

Full Story

Mark Parker:   The Top 10 ways you can spot a modern farmer

Mark Parker:   The Top 10 ways you can spot a modern farmer

FarmTalk

10. When he gets stuck, he can give his wife the GPS coordinates so she can pick him up.

Full Story

Beef Production Gaining Efficiency, While Reducing Environmental Impact

Beef Production Gaining Efficiency, While Reducing Environmental Impact

Oklahoma Farm Report

Producing more with less. That’s the goal of sustainability. Dr. Sara Place, associate professor of animal science at Oklahoma State University has been tackling this very issue for the beef industry.

Full Story

Repeal of Country of Origin Labeling – it’s messy

Repeal of Country of Origin Labeling – it’s messy

Farm and Ranch Guide

For those not familiar with COOL, it is a United States program that requires all fresh beef, pork, chicken, goat, and lamb to be labeled with its country of origin. It sounds simple, but it gets messy.

Full Story

Feeder Cattle Heat Stress, Are You Ready for Summer?

Feeder Cattle Heat Stress, Are You Ready for Summer?

Richard Stowell PhD, Dee Griffin DVM

University of Nebraska

The thermo-comfort zone of feeder cattle and mature cows range from subzero temperatures in the winter to around 75 oF in the summer, depending on body condition, hair coat length, and plane of nutrition.

Full Story