Daily Archives: March 5, 2014

All About Oral Electrolytes

All About Oral Electrolytes

Michelle Arnold, DVM

BEEF

There are five major infectious causes of diarrhea in calves less than 21 days of age. These include E. coli K99, rotavirus, coronavirus, Cryptosporidia, and Salmonella species. Noninfectious factors such as insufficient or poor-quality colostrum, poor sanitation, stress and cold weather can also cause or contribute to neonatal calf diarrhea.

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The Right Vaccine for a Bull

The Right Vaccine for a Bull

Dr. Ken McMillan

DTN/The Progressive Farmer

One reader wants to know the best vaccine to use for banded bulls.

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Plan to import beef from Brazil causes an uproar

Plan to import beef from Brazil causes an uproar

MIKE MCGRAW

The Kansas City Star

Foot and mouth disease is so highly contagious it can be spread on a gentle breeze or the tires of farm machinery. The disease, which affects cattle and other hooved animals, was eradicated in the U.S. more than 80 years ago. But a government proposal to import fresh beef from Brazil — where the disease is still active — has ignited fears of a new epidemic that could cost the U.S. cattle industry billions of dollars.

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Education efforts re-evaluated for BQA and ANCW

Education efforts re-evaluated for BQA and ANCW

Troy Smith and Shauna Hermel

The Cattle Business Weekly

"BQA is not about regulation. We provide education and guidelines," said Oklahoma veterinarian Bob Smith, a member of the national BQA Advisory Board.

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Factors That Affect Breeding Ability in Bulls

Factors That Affect Breeding Ability in Bulls

Heather Smith Thomas

Hereford World

There are many factors that play a role in fertility and breeding ability in bulls, including semen quality, soundness, desire to breed cows, etc. Most producers make sure that every bull passes a breeding soundness examination (sometimes referred to as a BSE) before putting him out with cows.

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“Sorry” for the high price of beef — but “Sorry” soon may not cut it

"Sorry" for the high price of beef — but "Sorry" soon may not cut it

Examiner.com

They say “sorry” is the hardest word, but some grocery stores in small-town Minnesota have decided to deploy the “S” word as the best way to soothe sticker shock at the meat counter.

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What Rolling Stone’s scary farm exposé gets right— and wrong

What Rolling Stone’s scary farm exposé gets right— and wrong

Nathanael Johnson

Grist

Rolling Stone‘s recent gore-filled expose on animal farming makes me profoundly uncomfortable. It isn’t just that the pictures are revolting, and the tales of animal cruelty make me flinch: I’m angry that I’ve been manipulated in this way, and yet I’m not sure I have any right to look away. That’s what stings.

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Bullish outlook offered for Hoosier beef industry

Bullish outlook offered for Hoosier beef industry

Erica Quinlan

AgriNews

Keeping cows warm and fed during winter months is just one job for farmers and members of the Indiana Beef Cattle Association. Participating in the association’s annual business meeting was on the agenda for a crowded room of farmers and industry members. The meeting included an update on the industry and an election for 2014 officers.

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Persistent Calif. drought to delay U.S. cattle herd rebuilding

Persistent Calif. drought to delay U.S. cattle herd rebuilding

Theopolis Waters

Reuters

California’s recent rains brought only short-term relief to the state which is suffering its worst drought in a century, leaving cattle rancher Kevin Kester to stick to his strategy of salvaging as much of his operation as possible for his three children to have a future in the cattle business.

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Why one Illinois Angus breeder uses DNA testing in his herd

Why one Illinois Angus breeder uses DNA testing in his herd

 American Angus Association

Accuracy and reliability are becoming required tools of the trade for many in agriculture. On a diversified farm in central Illinois, T.J. Curtin has seen that reality in all areas of production – from growing corn and soybeans to raising registered Angus bulls.

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