Daily Archives: August 2, 2013

BeefTalk: Pondering Grass

BeefTalk: Pondering Grass

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

The Dickinson Research Extension Center had three pens of yearling steers. One pen (A) was harvested when the steers were 18.1 months old. The next pen (B) was harvested when the steers were 21.4 months old and the last pen (C) was harvested when they were 22.1 months old.

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Worldwide aging and personalized medicine in the genomic era

Worldwide aging and personalized medicine in the genomic era

Drovers

Both human and animal science researchers are now exploring beyond the genes defined by our DNA and instead are increasing their focus on RNA, specifically the world of microRNAs. Regardless of our genetic makeup, these newly discovered, tiny pieces of RNA dictate how and when specific genes function throughout an animal’s or human’s lifespan.

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Brangus Provides New Selection Tools

Brangus Provides New Selection Tools

Cattle Today

The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) continues to stay on the cutting edge of the latest technology by providing tools for commercial cattlemen to assist in comparing the expected performance of Brangus sired offspring to that of other breeds.

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Tri-State Beef Conference offering new virtual tours

Tri-State Beef Conference offering new virtual tours

MELINDA WILLIAMS

Southwest Times (VA)

This year’s Tri-State Beef Cattle Conference will feature, for the first time, virtual tours of four outstanding beef cattle operations.

The sixth annual event, which costs $25, will be held Thursday and Friday, Aug. 8-9, at Washington County Fairgrounds. Programs begin at 2 p.m. Thursday and 8:30 a.m. Friday. There will be an evening meal and evening speaker Thursday.

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Utilizing growth-promoting technology to improve cattle performance

Utilizing growth-promoting technology to improve cattle performance

Devan M. P. Compart

Minnesota Farm Guide

A variety of FDA-approved growth-promoting technologies are available to producers. The most common growth-promoting technology utilized today are steroid implants. Additionally, beta-agonists provide producers with a great opportunity to add extra gain in the final days on feed before harvest.

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Monitoring Herd Health, Feeding Behavior May Soon Be Easier

Monitoring Herd Health, Feeding Behavior May Soon Be Easier

Beef Producer

A new system that monitors livestock feeding behavior has been developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center.

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K-State Hosts Beef Conference

K-State Hosts Beef Conference

Bria Dansby

KMAN

Kansas State University will be hosting the 2013 Beef Conference called Strategic Cow Herd Management: Surviving and Rebuilding after Persistent Drought on Aug 6. in Frick Auditorium.

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Beef Industry Faces A Dilemma Over Use Of Beta-Agonists

Beef Industry Faces A Dilemma Over Use Of Beta-Agonists

Troy Marshall

BEEF

Most cattle producers can’t accurately describe what a beta-agonist is or does, but they can attest to the fact that they work at increasing efficiency and pounds – and at a rate simply short of amazing.

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Tennessee sets workshops to market beef directly to consumers

Tennessee sets workshops to market beef directly to consumers

Southeast Farm Press

Consumers are interested in buying food from local suppliers, including local beef producers. Since beef cattle is among the top commodities produced in Tennessee, with some 950,000 beef cattle in the state, the number of cattle producers interested in marketing beef directly to local consumers is on the rise.

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Beef produces should strive to maintain proper levels of legumes in their forage stands

Beef produces should strive to maintain proper levels of legumes in their forage stands

Frank Wardynski

Michigan State University

Maintaining grass and legume pastures as well as hay fields are important management factors for feeding beef cattle. Many beef producers plant a mixture of grass and legumes during hayfield establishment – but over time legumes can die out and become a lower percentage of the forage stand.

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