Daily Archives: January 31, 2013

Video

Castrate bull calves before weaning and marketing

Castrate bull calves before weaning and marketing
University of Arkansas
Spring calving has started and fall born calves are being gathered for processing. The following video presentation discusses the importance of castrating male calves prior to weaning and marketing.

Tammi Didlot Proud of Accomplishments as President of American National Cattlewomen

Tammi Didlot Proud of Accomplishments as President of American National Cattlewomen

Oklahoma Farm Report

Didlot said she’s had a very busy year and says her time has been well spent.

“I can say without a doubt it’s been worth my time. It’s a labor of love. You just find the time to make it work. But it has definitely been the experience of a lifetime.”

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Cattle rustling does occur

Cattle rustling does occur

Mark Keaton

Baxter Bulletin

There have been several reports of cattle theft in Missouri recently, and Arkansas could be next.

Many think cattle rustling is a thing of the past, a common theme in old western movies.

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There’s something for everyone at cattle industry convention and trade show

There’s something for everyone at cattle industry convention and trade show

Southwest Farm Press

The 2013 Cattle Industry Convention and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Trade Show, taking place Feb. 6-9 in Tampa, Fla., will offer something for everyone.

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Younger Calving Cows Most At Risk To Predators

Younger Calving Cows Most At Risk To Predators

Cornelia Flörcke

BEEF

Cows separating from the herd during calving can be risky behavior in areas with predators. Research shows three- and four-year-old cows are most at risk.

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A Guide to Udder and Teat Scoring Beef Cows

A Guide to Udder and Teat Scoring Beef Cows

Dr. Rick Rasby

University of Nebraska – Lincoln.

The conformation of a beef cow’s teats and udder are important in a profitable cow/calf enterprise. Females with poor udder and teat conformation are a management challenge for commercial cow/calf producers. Cattle producers do not have the time or labor to manage around cows that need intervention at calving to physically ‘milk-out’ a quarter(s) so that the calf can suckle or to save the quarter from infection.

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Finishing Beef Cattle on Grass with Self-Fed By-Products

Finishing Beef Cattle on Grass with Self-Fed By-Products

Dan Morrical, Mark Honeyman, Jim Russell, and Daryl Strohbehn, Dallas Maxwell, Darrell Busby and Joe Sellers,

Iowa State University

There has been increasing interest by consumers in beef from cattle that are finished or fattened “on grass” rather than in a conventional feedlot. Also recently, Iowa has had a proliferation of plants that produce ethanol from corn. The byproduct of this process is distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS).

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In Beef Production, Cow-Calf Phase Contributes Most Greenhouse Gases

In Beef Production, Cow-Calf Phase Contributes Most Greenhouse Gases

Science Daily

Editor’s note: Stories of this ilk are included in the blog to inform those in our industry how agriculture is being presented to and perceived by the public.

Scientists have long known that cattle produce carbon dioxide and methane throughout their lives, but a new study pinpoints the cow-calf stage as a major contributor of greenhouse gases during beef production.

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Bedding Feedlot Cattle in the Winter

Bedding Feedlot Cattle in the Winter

Warren Rusche

iGrow

“To bed or not to bed?” With apologies to William Shakespeare, that is the question on the minds of many feedlot managers as we head into the winter months. Will providing bedding result in enough extra performance to outweigh the additional expenses in both material and labor?

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Calving and Cow/Calf Days straight ahead

Calving and Cow/Calf Days straight ahead

Allen Bridges

Minnesota Farm Guide

From just a few cows to several hundred, beef herds in Minnesota have a significant impact on the local and state economy. It has been estimated that each beef cow generates $338 for the local economy.

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