Daily Archives: August 23, 2012

Testing Forage Before Cutting Protects Against Potentially Poisonous Hay

Testing Forage Before Cutting Protects Against Potentially Poisonous Hay

Oklahoma Farm Report

Oklahoma State University Extension Animal Scientist Emeritus Glenn Selk writes in the latest Cow-Calf Corner newsletter that producers should exercise caution before turning cattle out or cutting hay in drought-stressed pastures.

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Marketing Animal Welfare With Certification

Marketing Animal Welfare With Certification

Kelli Boylan

Hay & Forage Producer

A growing number of consumers are “hungry to know where their food comes from,” says Rod Ofte. More than that, they want to know that it comes from animals fed healthily and treated humanely.

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Purdue Extension to host southern Indiana grazing workshop

Purdue Extension to host southern Indiana grazing workshop

Jennifer Stewart

Ag Answers

A Sept. 14-15 Purdue Extension conference in southern Indiana will help livestock producers integrate management-intensive grazing programs in their operations.

Grazing 102 will run from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sept. 14 and from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 15. It will be at the Southern Indiana-Purdue Agricultural Center, 11371 East Purdue Farm Road, Dubois.

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Quality Beef by the Numbers may help producers rebuild herds devastated by 2012 drought

Quality Beef by the Numbers may help producers rebuild herds devastated by 2012 drought

University of Missouri

This year’s drought has taken its toll on the livestock industry, which has sold off thousands of animals because feed is too costly. A program at the University of Missouri may help these producers rebuild their herds with animals that produce more of the high-quality grades of beef that consumers are demanding.

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Farmers hunt far and wide for hay for their animals

Farmers hunt far and wide for hay for their animals

Judy Keen

USA Today

Farmers are resorting to pleas on Facebook, Craigslist and other online sites to track down hay to feed their cattle, horses, sheep and goats now and through the winter.

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Lush green grass proves lethal for Polk County cattle

Lush green grass proves lethal for Polk County cattle

Linda Russell

KY3

It’s some of the greenest grass out there, but it can be deadly.  A farmer near Brighton has lost five cattle to johnsongrass, and he wants to warn others of the danger.

Rick Davis has been raising cattle for more than 30 years.  "We knew about it.  We’ve cut it for hay over the years and never had any problems with it," Davis says.

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Cattle That Grow & Grade Are Money In The Bank

Cattle That Grow & Grade Are Money In The Bank

Tom Brink     

BEEF

The purpose of this article is to highlight the exceptional value and profit potential created by cattle that grow fast and grade well. Cattle that grow and grade are winners at all points along the beef supply chain.

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Reduced cow herd could mean bigger profits

Reduced cow herd could mean bigger profits

AgriMarketing

The U.S. beef herd has been shrinking, and the worst drought in decades has only encouraged that trend to continue. But for beef producers who can withstand the financial hardship over the next several months, reduced beef supplies could mean bigger profits starting as early as late 2013.

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Civil War: Steak on the hoof, story of ‘Great Beefsteak Raid’

Civil War: Steak on the hoof, story of ‘Great Beefsteak Raid’

Martha M. Boltz

Washington Times

It was September of 1864 and the fighting around Petersburg, Va. had been going on for some time. The Yankee forces were stretched thin, leaving their rear troop portions vulnerable to attack by the Confederates.

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Beef Herd Tumbles to 40-Year Low on Feed Cost Surge

Beef Herd Tumbles to 40-Year Low on Feed Cost Surge

Whitney McFerron, Tony C. Dreibus and Elizabeth Campbell

Businessweek

The worst U.S. drought in a half century and record feed prices are spurring farmers to shrink cattle herds to the smallest in two generations, driving beef prices higher.

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