Daily Archives: August 4, 2011

Heat killed up to 4,000 Iowa cattle

Heat killed up to 4,000 Iowa cattle

Des Moines Register’

A spokesman for the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association said a poll of members put the death toll of cattle in Iowa during last week’s heat wave at between 3,400 and 4,000 head.

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What Makes A Cowboy, A Cowboy?

What Makes A Cowboy, A Cowboy?

Farmgate

What makes a cowboy, a cowboy?  If you don’t have access to thousands of acres of rangeland, why do you have cattle?  If you don’t have a million dollars to risk on feedlot operations, why do you have cattle?

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Fescue toxicosis

Fescue toxicosis

Dr. Bob Larson

Angus Journal

Tall fescue is a commonly grown forage for cattle, particularly in the Southeastern and lower Midwest states, as well as the Pacific Northwest.

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Hot weather in late gestation affects fall birth weights

Hot weather in late gestation affects fall birth weights

Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist

TSCRA

The summer of 2011 will have impacts on the cattle industry in many ways. One of the more subtle results from the extreme July and August heat will be a reduction in birth weights of fall-born calves.

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Livestock producers should be aware of prussic acid levels in forages

Livestock producers should be aware of prussic acid levels in forages

Blair Fannin

Agrilife Today

Livestock producers can quickly lose animals if they fail to carefully monitor forages as the Texas drought continues, according to a toxicology expert from the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory.

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Drought 2011: The ripple effect

Drought 2011: The ripple effect

Janet Gregg

Jacksonville Daily Progress

The impact of the current drought on the state’s agriculture industry has been devastating already and is likely to worsen if the drought continues through next year as some experts predict.

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Drought shrinking nation’s beef inventory

Drought shrinking nation’s beef inventory

WXIA

Cattle ranchers in drought-plagued Texas and Oklahoma – the nation’s top two beef producers – are selling off their cows because they don’t have the pastures to sustain them.

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