Daily Archives: March 4, 2011

High-quality beef – what and why

High-quality beef – what and why

Ed Phillips

Delta Farm Press

In the face of rising feed costs, American cattlemen are focused on high quality now more than ever before.

With rising feed costs, cattlemen are looking for ways to get the most from their calves. Genetics, management and marketing all play a role. In this Certified Angus Beef video, Brian Bertelsen, U.S. Premium Beef field operations vice president, and Paul Dykstra, CAB beef cattle specialist, discuss the importance of marbling and the reasons American cattle producers aim for high quality now more than ever.

 

A Good Offense Starts with a Good Defense

A Good Offense Starts with a Good Defense

Walt Barnhart

Calf News

Over the years, cattle feeders have often found themselves in the crosshairs when it comes to consumer perception of the beef industry. If it isn’t the environment, it’s animal welfare. If it isn’t food safety, it’s feeding grain to cattle.

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Cattle Body Condition Research Calls For Maintaining a 5-6 Score

Cattle Body Condition Research Calls For Maintaining a 5-6 Score

Southernlivestock.com

Research suggests that feeding cows a ration that maintains a body condition score of five or six throughout gestation will help produce healthy calves.

Calves from cows that were not too fat or too thin throughout gestation – also appear to gain better than those calves from cows that were too fat or too thin.

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USDA Predicts Cattle Numbers to Fall, Production Costs to Rise

USDA Predicts Cattle Numbers to Fall, Production Costs to Rise

Linda H. Smith

DTN

Production of most meats will be down this year as higher production costs more than outstrip relatively strong slaughter prices, speakers said at USDA’s Outlook forum here this week.

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John Paterson: Increased animal welfare concerns here to stay

John Paterson: Increased animal welfare concerns here to stay

Bill Brewster

Tri State Livestock news

The concerns that consumers have today regarding animal welfare issues are here to stay according to Montana State University’s senior beef extension specialist John Paterson. He encouraged producers to take proactive actions to ward off the threat of increased government regulations.

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Blood tests to check for pregnancy allows producers to better market open cows

Blood tests to check for pregnancy allows producers to better market open cows

Gayle Smith

The Fence Post

Commercial producers can sell open cows earlier generating more profit by using an inexpensive blood test to detect pregnancy. In fact, the test is so simple, producers can draw blood from the cows themselves, and send it to a laboratory for testing.

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Grazing of cattle pastures can improve soil quality

Grazing of cattle pastures can improve soil quality

R&D

A team of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists has given growers in the Piedmont guidance on how to restore degraded soils and make the land productive. Researchers with the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) found that if cattle are managed so that they graze moderately, soil quality can be restored and emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) can be reduced.

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What’s the beef?

What’s the beef?

Kaely Moore

Boulder Weekly

In an age where people are becoming increasingly interested in the origins of their food, however, there has been a growing trend toward eating beef that has not been raised on a diet of grain.

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When Will She Calve?

When Will She Calve?

Ryan Goodman

Beef Today

I have been asked a few times, "how do you know when a cow is going to calve?" By now, "I just know." In reality, there is a whole cascade of events that lead up to parturition in cattle. I remember as a kid we had a crazy red cow behind the house that my dad kept waiting for her to calve.

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BeefTalk: Plan Now for May and June Bull Turnout

BeefTalk: Plan Now for May and June Bull Turnout

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

It’s that time of year, which is bull time. Many producers are thinking it’s calving time, but calving time is a function of bull time. In other words, having healthy, good bulls ready for turnout in the spring is critical for next year’s calving time.

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