Daily Archives: February 1, 2011

To fix global warming, how about a meat tax?

To fix global warming, how about a meat tax?

Tim Wall

Discovery Channel

Editor’s note: Stories of this ilk are included in the blog to inform those in our industry how agriculture is being presented to and perceived by the public.

Many people think with either their wallets or their stomachs. Taking advantage of that can be used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

A tax on meat and milk would likely mean we’d buy less of the foods that contribute to climate change.

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Care of the newborn calf

Care of the newborn calf

Dave Barz, DVM

Tri State Livestock News

Winter has finally returned to the plains. The temperatures are frigid and the winds continue to howl. To make matters worse, we get an inch or two of snow every few days. Many of you will be calving soon and it will be a tough job to help young calves maintain normal body temperature.

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Know What You’re Feeding Your Livestock

Know What You’re Feeding Your Livestock

Beef Today

The finding that moldy sweet potatoes led to the death of 200 steers on a Portage County farm has prompted Wisconsin State Veterinarian Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt to remind producers to be well aware of exactly what goes into their livestock feed rations.

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Let the Cows Do the Work

Let the Cows Do the Work

Becky Mills

DTN

Our operation isn’t fancy,” says Robert Shoemaker. “We let the cows do the work.” And work they do. Using rotational grazing and stockpiled forages, the Delaplane, Va., cattleman runs 250 cows and 50 bred heifers year-round with little hay or supplement.

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Effects of Calving Difficulty and Confined Calving on Calf Sickness

Effects of Calving Difficulty and Confined Calving on Calf Sickness

Dr. Glenn Selk, Professor, Animal Science – Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK

As the 2011 spring calving season begins, producers may want to assess some basic management strategies that affect the incidence of sickness in the baby calves. Two key areas to consider include (1) the condition of the calving pasture and (2) the amount of calving difficulty that occurs in the herd.

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Temple Grandin: See surroundings as cattle would

Temple Grandin: See surroundings as cattle would

Southeast Farm Press

Farmers will find it much easier to handle livestock if they understand an animal’s point of view.

That’s what national animal welfare expert Temple Grandin told close to 400 attendees at the Virginia Forage and Grassland Council’s winter beef conference.

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Treating scours in beef cattle

Treating scours in beef cattle

Stuart Barber

Weekly Times Now

Scouring, or diarrhea, is a common problem for calves from dairy cattle, as was discussed in a recent FARM article.

It can also cause significant problems in beef herds.

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Defining postpartum uterine disease in cattle

Defining postpartum uterine disease in cattle

Vetsweb.com

Researchers in the UK, USA and Canada carried out a study to provide clear clinical definitions of uterine disease in cattle that researchers could adopt.

Uterine function is often compromised in cattle by bacterial contamination of the uterine lumen after parturition, and pathogenic bacteria often persist, causing uterine disease, a key cause of infertility in cattle.

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Texas discovers new cattle brucellosis infected herd

Texas discovers new cattle brucellosis infected herd

Stacy Fox

khou.com

For the first time in over five years, a cattle herd in Texas has been diagnosed with bovine brucellosis (Bangs disease). According to Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) officials, a small beef herd in South Texas (Starr County) has been determined to be infected.

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Hormones In Food: Should You Worry?

Hormones In Food: Should You Worry?

Huffington Post

Editor’s note: Stories of this ilk are included in the blog to inform those in our industry how agriculture is being presented to and perceived by the public.

A salmon that grows to market size twice as fast as normal. Dairy cows that produce 15 percent more milk. Beef cows that grow 20 percent faster.

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