Daily Archives: March 9, 2009

Mike Miller, Cattle Fax: Economic Perspective

Mike Miller, Cattle Fax, discusses the long-term effects of rising costs on beef quality, demand and profit. Recorded a the 2008 Beef Quality Summit, November 2008, Colorado Springs, CO. This Recording is a production of the Animal Sciences Department, Purdue University.

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H.R. 814 will make NAIS federal law

 H.R. 814 will make NAIS federal law

Marti Oakley

H.R. 814 reads, in part:

To amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the Federal Meat Inspection Act, the Poultry Products Inspection Act, and the Egg Products Inspection Act to improve the safety of food, meat, and poultry products through enhanced traceability, and for other purposes.

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Healthy animals means healthy food

Healthy animals means healthy food

John Schlageck

The Emporia Gazette

Today, raising livestock on a farm or ranch is a dynamic, specialized profession that has proven one of the most successful in the world. Today’s animal husbandry, or care and feeding of livestock, is no accident.

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Cattlemen Speaker Outlines His Beefs

Cattlemen Speaker Outlines His Beefs

Gary Gray

Bristol Herald Courier

The nation’s new stimulus package will do nothing but “patch things up for awhile,” J. Burton Eller, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association vice president of government affairs, told the 14-county Southwest Virginia Agriculture Association on Saturday.

Eller was one of two guest speakers at the meeting, where association members from 14 Southwest Virginia counties heard what in essence was a conservative rally for deregulation and less government interference.

“The country’s a different place right now – the world’s a different place,” Eller said.

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George Will: Corn-fed diet bad medicine for Americans

George Will: Corn-fed diet bad medicine for Americans

News-press.com

WASHINGTON — Tom Vilsack, Iowa’s former governor, calls his “the most important department in government,” noting that the Agriculture Department serves education through school nutrition programs and serves diplomacy by trying to wean Afghanistan from a poppy-based (meaning heroin-based) economy. But Vilsack’s department matters most because of the health costs of the American diet. If Michael Pollan is right, the problem is rooted in politics and, in a sense, Iowa.

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Hunger for locally-produced meat grows

Hunger for locally-produced meat grows

Though costlier, homegrown products enjoy rising demand

John Boyle

Asheville Citizen Times

When it comes to locally grown food, produce usually grabs the headlines.

It’s eye-catching, bountiful at local tailgate markets, and it’s relatively simple to grow and sell.

But demand for locally produced meat also continues to boom in the mountains as people seek out a connection with their food providers and a healthier alternative to mass-produced products.

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Drought, Recession Scorch Texas Cattle Ranchers

Drought, Recession Scorch Texas Cattle Ranchers

Ed Stoddard and Jessica Rinaldi

The Post Chronicle

Frates Seeligson recalls when his ranch last saw rain: September of last year.That was around the time he took on an extra 200 cows to help a farmer whose fields were ravaged by Hurricane Ike.

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Fed on corn and petroleum

Fed on corn and petroleum

Heraldtribune.com

Tom Vilsack, Iowa’s former governor, calls his “the most important department in government,” noting that the Agriculture Department serves education through school nutrition programs and serves diplomacy by trying to wean Afghanistan from a poppy-based (meaning heroin-based) economy. But Vilsack’s department matters most because of the health costs of the American diet. If Michael Pollan is right, the problem is rooted in politics and, in a sense, Iowa.

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Ranch Tours: Is family ranching a thing of the past?

Ranch Tours: Is family ranching a thing of the past?

Holly Wise

Silver City Sun-News

The future of family ranching is bleak in the eyes of one Catron County rancher who recently told me he foresees the day that such ranching will end.

“The days of family ranching are over,” said Ace McPhaul, 32, while sitting at the home headquarters of the Southern Cross Ranch, a ranch he’s managed for three years with his wife, Timber, and two small children.

Instead of belonging to families, Ace said he foresees the day when the land is taken over as investment property and “as an afterthought, put cattle on it. We’ll see more and more of incorporations becoming somehow involved.”

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From Pasture to Plate

From Pasture to Plate

CHRIS HAMILTON

The Maui News

It’s midmorning, and Haleakala Ranch’s small-livestock manager, Michael Abreu, is shifting his unusual herd – Maui lamb – from the field to paddock using a high-pitched whistle and Ben, his whip-smart kelpie border collie.

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EPA to withdraw from Idaho feedlot agreements

EPA to withdraw from Idaho feedlot agreements

The Olympian

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is withdrawing from two agreements with Idaho concerning the regulating of animal feed lots, an officials says.

Ed Kowalski, head of EPA’s regional enforcement group, said confined-animal feeding operations have become a national priority with the agency and it plans to play a more direct role in inspection and enforcement.

The agreements concerning the state’s dairy and beef-cattle operations regulate such things as discharges of animal waste into state waters.

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Trend Helps Local Ranchers Beat The Recession

Trend Helps Local Ranchers Beat The Recession

Mike Hooker

Colorado’s beef industry is feeling the pinch from the economy, but one trend is helping local ranchers beat the recession.

It seems beef lovers in other countries have developed quite a taste for Colorado beef. Cattle breeder Skylar Houston says his Angus cattle still sell for a premium, but he’s selling fewer of them.

“We sent bulls a couple weeks ago to Kansas and the guy that last year bought five, bought two this year,” Skylar said.

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Extension service offers beef cattle seminar

Extension service offers beef cattle seminar

Pee Dee Star & Enterprise

Clemson University and the University of Georgia Extension Service will conduct a beef cattle forage seminar in the Marion County Extension Office at 206 Airport Court, Suite C, Mullins, on March 10.

The program, which begins at 5:30 p.m., will cover strategies for tight budgets and minimal risk associated with pasture and hay land.  The seminar is free to participants and pesticide and CCA credits have been applied for. Supper will be served.

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Calving Issues In Beef Cattle

Calving Issues In Beef Cattle

cattlenetwork.com

The calving process in beef cows can be challenging, especially when things don’t go normally. Dr. Bob Larson, former MU Extension Veterinarian, offered advice on calving issues, and I’ve listed a few of his comments below.

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Tennessee get high marks in agriculture

Tennessee get high marks in agriculture

Memphis Business Journal

Tennessee ranks in the national top 10 in the production of five crops and in two livestock categories, according to new numbers from the National Agricultural Statistics Service.

The state ranked second in meat goat inventory with 133,000 head counted in 2008. Tennessee ranked third in tobacco production with 52 million pounds produced here last year.

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