Daily Archives: September 23, 2008

Lack of local USDA plants limit ranchers

By KEITH CHU Gazette Times Sexton Ranches near Haines has bought into the local food movement, big time. The family-operated business sells its beef and sheep exclusively at farmers markets and to restaurants in Eastern Oregon and across the Idaho state line. Its cows are grass-fed, which generally produces leaner meat. But there’s one part of the business that owners Andi and Richard Sexton can’t do locally — slaughter and process their animals.

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Baxter Black: BUCKLE UP

Baxter Black:  BUCKLE UP

The news has coincided recently with protesters demanding to be able to purchase raw milk, the AMA warning that home births are not safe, and desperate cancer victims reserving the right to buy alternative “cures” not approved by the F.D.A.

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Video Feature: Switchgrass for Forage and Ethanol

Video Feature: Switchgrass for Forage and Ethanol

Switchgrass is forage grown in Tennessee that could soon be a source for gasoline – possibly reducing our nation’s dependence on foreign oil. But does the crop have other potential uses? Experts with UT’s Institute of Agriculture believe switchgrass is nutritious for farm animals, and environmentally friendly.

 

Save On Delivery Costs By Decreasing the Frequency of Protein Supplementation

Save On Delivery Costs By Decreasing the Frequency of Protein Supplementation

Aaron Stalker, Beef Specialist, University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

With today’s high fuel costs decreasing the frequency of protein supplement delivery can help reduce costs. Numerous research studies have demonstrated similar animal performance when cattle are fed protein supplements either daily or twice the daily amount every other day. Even longer intervals have been shown to be effective.

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Genetic Defects… Better Safe than Sorry

Genetic Defects… Better Safe than Sorry

Larry Keenan

American Red Angus Magazine

Many breed associations have had the unfortunate experience of fighting through a genetic defect outbreak. Those of you who keep up with other breeds may be familiar with Tibial Hemimelia (TH) and/or Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Anasarca (PHA). Initially, attempts to control these genetic defects met with limited success because the respective breed associations had no policy for reporting abnormal animals and placing carrier animals on a published list. While implementation of genetic defect reporting rules are getting the outbreaks under control, the fact of the matter is, if a genetic defect reporting rule had been in place, and members reported all abnormal animals produced on their operation, there would not have been a widespread outbreak.

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Some Facts Regarding Foot Rot

Some Facts Regarding Foot Rot

cattlenetwork.com

Several producers seem to be having difficulty with foot rot this summer/fall. Following are some quick FACTS and FICTIONS regarding foot rot in cattle.

1. Foot rot is only a problem when there are wet conditions. FICTION.

While it is true that in wet conditions the skin around the hoof will soften and thin, making it susceptible to injure and allow bacteria to enter, dry conditions also can lead to foot rot. In dry conditions, injuries to the foot can happen easily with stubble, thorns, etc. and crowded loafing areas can lead to a concentrated amount of bacteria to exposed the injured skin.

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UC Davis Forms Welfare Institute

UC Davis Forms Welfare Institute

Thebeefsite.com

The School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis has formed a new division, the International Animal Welfare Training Institute, to examine and address animal welfare issues in many species.

Faculty at the Veterinary School met with members of the beef and dairy industries to develop practices that will benefit the welfare of food animals. The group discussed the animal welfare concerns of consumers and farmers alike, including science-based welfare practices.

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Texas Longhorn Cattle to Compete for Longest Horn Span in the World

Texas Longhorn Cattle to Compete for Longest Horn Span in the World

Newswire.com

Biggest Texas Longhorn Event of the Year to Draw Hundreds of Breeders and Collectors From Across the U.S. for Horn Length Competition and Sale

On October 2, hundreds of breeders and collectors of Texas Longhorn cattle will gather at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Oklahoma to find out who owns bragging rights to the cow and bull with the longest horns in the world. After the competition, participants will have an opportunity to purchase new breeding stock at the October 4 auction.

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Limiting cows’ access time to hay can stretch the roll

Limiting cows’ access time to hay can stretch the roll

GARY TILGHMAN

Glasgow Daily Times

The lack of precipitation again has folks asking how to manage cattle on limited forage resources. In these challenging times, it does not hurt to discuss strategies to conserve precious inputs.

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NCBA forms Young Producers’ Council

NCBA forms Young Producers’ Council

Tom Wray

National Provisioner

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) last week created the Young Producers’ Council (YPC) to provide an opportunity to get young people involved in the beef industry.

The YPC was authorized through interim policy passed in July by NCBA Policy Division board members at the Cattle Industry Summer Conference. Surveys conducted earlier in the year reportedly showed strong enthusiasm for such a council, and suggested that young people wanted more involvement in the workings of the organization, including a strong voice in policy decisions.

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Jury Still Out in U.K. on BSE-Human Connection

Jury Still Out in U.K. on BSE-Human Connection

Muriel Elizabeth Hayes

Beef Magazine

After 12 years, the U.K. Food Standards Agency (FTA) admits there is no connection between BSE and Humans.

This all began, when Conservative MP Stephen Dorrel, said in the House of Commons, London, on March 20 1996 that “there was the possibility of a link between BSE and CJD”. Of course, the media and other nation’s governments soon followed in this line of thinking.

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Proper Harvest Critical To Making Silage

Proper Harvest Critical To Making Silage

cattlenetwork.com

Many producers growing corn for silage are ready to chop, but the corn may not be at the correct moisture level.

“Harvesting corn silage at the correct moisture is critical for feed quality,” says J.W. Schroeder, North Dakota State University Extension Service dairy specialist. “The best livestock performance and corn silage fermentation usually occur when whole-plant moisture is 65 percent to 70 percent. This corresponds well to horizontal and bag silos, but silage may have to be somewhat drier in tall tower silos to prevent seepage.”

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KSU Stocker Conference Is Oct. 2

KSU Stocker Conference Is Oct. 2

Beef Stocker Trends

This year’s Kansas State University (KSU) Beef Stocker Conference – Oct. 2 – promises a dynamic mix of insightful presentations focusing on the stocker business, specifically, as well as hands-on demonstrations of the latest technologies available to stocker operators.

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Angus’ 135 year heritage celebrated at field day

Angus’ 135 year heritage celebrated at field day

Fort Scott Tribune

The Kansas Angus Association will host its 2008 field day on Sept. 27 in Victoria, in conjunction with a day of celebration of the heritage of Angus cattle and the 125th Anniversary of the American Angus Association. A day-long program is planned, and will include a historical perspective, featured speakers and a Certified Angus Beef lunch. Area Angus breeders will also display cattle around the Grant Cemetery monument, which is located at 1st Street and Angus Drive.

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Operating Committee Cuts Millions in Beef Checkoff Programs for 2009.

Operating Committee Cuts Millions in Beef Checkoff Programs for 2009.

BEEF Magazine

The Beef Promotion Operating Committee approved spending the Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB) Fiscal Year 2009 program budget of $42 million on a total of 35 national checkoff programs. But it definitely was not an easy process, as committee members passionately debated proposals in an effort to find places to cut expenditures enough to meet decreasing revenue projections.

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Lack of local USDA plants limit ranchers

Lack of local USDA plants limit ranchers

By KEITH CHU

Gazette Times

Sexton Ranches near Haines has bought into the local food movement, big time. The family-operated business sells its beef and sheep exclusively at farmers markets and to restaurants in Eastern Oregon and across the Idaho state line. Its cows are grass-fed, which generally produces leaner meat.

But there’s one part of the business that owners Andi and Richard Sexton can’t do locally — slaughter and process their animals.

Full Story