Daily Archives: September 2, 2008

Video Feature: Grazing Corn Stalks

Agent Michael Fisher describes tips for grazing cattle on corn stalks.

 

Adjusting to the Economy

As escalating costs continue, these beef industry experts offer advice to help cow-calf producers adapt.

Kindra Gordon

Hereford World

With prices for corn and other grain commodities skyrocketing along with increasing fuel costs, many beef producers are likely asking themselves the question, “Where will it end?”

Unfortunately, no one has the answer. So, the next question becomes, “What should I do?”

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Toxicity problems associated with feed

Bob Larson, DVM

Angus Journal

Occasionally, human activities or natural conditions can cause the introduction or concentration of toxic substances in cattle feed. When this happens, a large number of animals can become sick at one time, and death losses can be high. Feed toxicities that can occur include excess ammonia, ionophore, gossypol, salt, nitrate or mycotoxin.

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Are We Losing Control Of Our Business Decisions?

Troy Marshall

Beef Magazine

Watching the Democratic National Convention this week, I began to wonder if politics has become so much about the pursuit of power that it has little time for anything else. Until hearing the Democratic speeches, for instance, I didn’t realize to what abysmal Third-World depths the American quality of life has descended, how much our economy resembles the darkest times of the Great Depression (even though our economy grew at a rather robust 3.3% rate in the second quarter), or how loathed our beloved U.S. has become in the world.

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Meaningful “Country of Origin Labeling” on our food may exist only in the dreams of food activists

Seattle Post Intelligencer

Do you care where your food came from?

Wouldn’t you like to know if the ground meat you’ve purchased came from a Middle Eastern country where camels out number cattle 500 to 1?

How about those dried banana chips from someplace in the center of Washington state or coffee beans from Canada?

And can anyone really know exactly which farm, in which country, the tomatoes came from?

I’m not sure that even the youngest among us will live long enough to actually see "country of origin labeling" on all food sold at U.S. markets.

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Beef cow symposium scheduled

KRVN

New methods and technologies to control and improve reproductive success in beef cattle is the focus of the "Robert Taylor Memorial Symposium: Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle" scheduled for Dec. 2 – 3, 2008 at the Hilton Hotel in Fort Collins, Colo. "This meeting is for anyone interested in beef cattle reproduction, including producers, veterinarians, AI (artificial insemination) technicians and Extension specialists," said Sandy Johnson, animal science specialist with Kansas State University Research and Extension and one of the conference coordinators.

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Evaluating Dried Distillers Grains As A Range Cow Supplement

CTN

The high cost of cattle feeds have many cow calf producers out “window shopping” for the best buys in cow supplements for this winter.  Feedlot and backgrounders have experience with the biofuel by-products such as dried distillers grains.  Many cow calf producers are still uncertain about their use as supplements for cows on dormant winter grass.  Therefore OSU nutritionists have studied the use of dried distillers grains (with solubles) as supplements for low quality forages for gestating cows.

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Q&A Is there an ideal weight range for a finshed feedlot steer. A weight that will help produce the top meat classification.

A:    I don’t know if there is an "ideal" weight. Usually the taller the frame the heavier the weight at slaughter. A beef animal that is ready to slaughter at 850 lb is a pretty small frame animal.

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How Much Is The Cost Of Gain Going To Be?

cattlenetwork.com

Compared to last week, feeder and stocker cattle mostly steady to 2.00 lower again this week, with the exception of the Southeast complex trading steady to 2.00 higher for the most part.  Order buyers had to use a little ingenuity in auctions this week as in some places throughout the country, small packages made up more consignments this week.  Cattle suitable for grazing were the most in demand this week as a start to wheat planting is on the mind of farmers in the South Plains.  Drills have started to move this week and this year is much different than last.

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Bloat In Cattle

M.B. Irsik, DVM, MAB

Definition and Etiology

Bloat is the abnormal accumulation of gas in the ruminal forestomachs. Three categories of bloat are (1) frothy bloat caused by diets that lead to the formation of a stable froth or foam in the rumen, (2) free gas bloat caused by diets that lead to excessive gas production and concomitant low intraruminal pH, and (3) free gas bloat caused by failure to eructate from extraruminal causes of gas accumulation such as esophageal obstruction. When bloating occurs, these gases cannot escape, and they continue to build up and cause severe distention of the abdomen, compression of the heart and lungs, and eventually death

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Value Of Gain Historically High

Beef Stocker Trends

“Historically, we’ve used a value of gain of about 50¢/lb. on growing cattle,” says Matt Poore, North Carolina State University Extension livestock nutritionist. “With lighter weight feeder cattle now priced similarly to heavier weight feeders, it suggests value of gain in this new environment may be worth as much $1/lb., which is what the feedlot cost of gain is currently.”

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Learning About Animal Welfare Online

Thebeefsite.com

TheHumaneTouch.org Web site is American Humane Certified’s(TM) latest tool for consumers to learn more about the humane treatment of farm animals used to produce food. The animal welfare organisation says that the site is a resource for consumers, producers, retailers and the food service industry to learn more about animal welfare standards.

American Humane Certified is a voluntary, fee-based service available to agricultural producers of protein products. The program provides independent, third-party audited verification that the care and handling of animals of enrolled farms meet the strict animal welfare standards set forth by American Humane Certified. Producers who meet the standards may use the American Humane Certified label on their products.

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Growing Bred Replacement Heifers

cattlenetwork.com

Bred replacement heifers that will calve in January and February need to continue to grow and maintain body condition.  Ideally, two year old heifers should be in a body condition score 6  at the time that their first calf is born.  This allows them the best opportunity to provide adequate colostrum to the baby, repair the reproductive tract, return to heat cycles, rebreed on time for next year, and continue normal body growth.  From now until calving time, the heifers will need to be gaining 1 to 1 1/2 pounds per head per day, assuming that they are in good body condition coming out of summer.

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BIF: New Frontiers

Angus Beef Bulletin

Beef industry leaders from around the world gathered in Calgary June 30-July 3 for the 2008 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Annual Meeting and Research Symposium. The Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) hosted nearly 400 cattle producers, industry representatives and academia for the event, themed “Beef Beyond Borders.”

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Grass-fed beef: lean & green, Here’s the skinny on where to buy it and how to cook it right

Amy Machnak

Sunset

Beef that’s conscientiously raised, good for you, and incredibly tasty — now that’s something to sink your teeth into.

A "new" alternative to grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef is increasingly available in supermarkets and from sources online.

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