Daily Archives: September 1, 2008

Baxter Black: BRUCELLOSIS YELLOWSTONE PARK

How many veterinarians, cattlemen, defenders of wildlife, Elk Foundation members, hunters, and National Park lovers would like to see Brucellosis eradicated in the bison, elk and cattle in the United States? Go ahead, raise your hand. All of us. Good.

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Demand for hamburger grows, driving prices higher for cull cows

West Central Research and Extension Center

North Platte Bulletin

 The demand for hamburger has increased dramatically as the U.S. economy has slowed.

That means cull cows are selling for more, bringing some profits to ranchers.

And, volatile markets will drive all meat prices higher for consumers.

Those observations were presented at a recent open house at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory north of Whitman.

"This year, we’ve had some record high cow prices and we expect them to go even higher next year," said Jim Robb, director of the Livestock Marketing Information Centere. "This is an area where cow/calf producers need to focus some of their management attention."

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Ranchers pack beef workshop

JULIE ZEEB

Daily News

More than 60 beef producers attended the Beef Quality Assurance Training Workshop Tuesday night at the Shasta Livestock Auction Yard in Cottonwood.

"We had a very good turnout," said Stevie Ipsen, California Beef Quality Assurance coordinator. "We shared with ranchers the news about the beef and livestock industries as well as talked about the importance of proper animal health, nutrition, transportation and animal identification practices."

John Maas, extension veterinarian at UC Davis, spoke about proper vaccination, injection and product use.

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Virginia beef cattle ‘ran out of grass’

STEVE SZKOTAK

WTOP News

Drenching rains are reviving parched pastures and hayfields and Virginia’s soybean crop, but they were too late for such summer field crops as corn.

Cattlemen count on two or three hay cuttings a season to feed their herds in the winter months. The dry summer has already forced some to bring their beef cattle to market early because of low hay and grass stores.

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Marbling: The good fat

High Plains Journal

Texas meat scientist explains health advantage of high-quality Angus beef

Marbling has become one of the least understood concepts in the beef-consuming world. No wonder, with all the competing and contradictory messages from "experts."

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The High Cost of Farming: North Carolina farmers are getting squeezed by high fuel prices and the long drought

Richard Craver

Journal Reporter

Ed Blackburn has never had illusions about being a wealthy livestock farmer.

Like most small cattle farmers in Northwest North Carolina, the time he has spent working his family’s farm in Tobaccoville — more than 30 years — has been more than a hobby, but less than a living.

"It’s my golf," Blackburn said with a chuckle.

It’s a realistic mind-set, considering that local and state agricultural officials say that about 90 percent of hobby farmers — those with two to 25 head of cattle — don’t turn a profit on their herds.

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Beef comes from home-grown, naturally fed cattle

Karen Dillon

The Roanoke Times

When it comes to locally produced food, Franklin County has a lot going for it. You can find homegrown fruits and vegetables at area produce stands. You can shop the local creamery for a variety of dairy goods. Now, add locally grown, farm-raised beef products to that ever-growing list.

RK Brand Beef raises its Black Angus beef cows from start to finish on its 122-acre farm in Glade Hill. The beef is processed at a USDA-certified facility near Hillsville. It’s weighed, packaged, labeled and shipped back to Franklin County for sale.

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Cow/calf production costs on the rise

Stjoenews.net

With the rising costs of pasture, feed and fuel, production costs in the beef industry are well above previous years, total cow/calf operating costs are expected to be more than $800 per cow this year, an increase greater than 25 percent since 2005, according to David Hoffman, a University of Missouri Extension livestock specialist.

While costs have increased, calf prices have declined since a peak in 2005, Mr. Hoffman said. “Beef producers are facing a challenge to find ways to remain profitable in light of the current increase in input costs of raising cattle.

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New packing plant owners ‘in it for the long run’

Bill Jackson

The Greeley Tribune

The Batista family of Brazil and the Monfort family of Greeley got their starts in similar ways, so it may be appropriate that the Batista family now operates the Greeley company that was started almost eight decades ago by the Monforts.

What was to become Monfort of Colorado, then Monfort Inc., then ConAgra Red Meats, then Swift & Co., and now JBS Swift & Co., was started in the Depression of the 1930s by a Greeley school teacher, Warren Monfort, who decided to buy 18 head of cattle and feed them on the family farm north of Greeley.

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Livestock issues to be covered at Sept. 8 field day

High Plains Journal

The Iowa State University McNay Research and Demonstration Farm will host a field day Sept. 8 with topics of interest to beef and sheep producers.

The free field day is open to the public. It begins at 3:30 p.m., at the farm, which is located near Lucas. You can reach the farm by going south four miles on Highway 65 from the intersection of highways 65 and 34, then two and a half miles east on a gravel road and north a quarter mile. The headquarters is on the east side of the road.

There will be informal tours of sheep, beef and forage projects beginning at 3:30 p.m. from the headquarters building.

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Potterosa Limousin Farms prepares for calving and bull sale

ANDREA JOHNSON,

Minnesota Farm Guide

There’s always something going on at a Minnesota purebred cow/calf farm like Potterosa Limousin Farms, west of Redwood Falls.

Minnesota Farm Guide caught up with the Redwood County farming operation on Jan. 24, just in time for 4 p.m. feeding.

With the wind chill well below zero, Roger Potter and employee Paul Zeug, prepared to feed 75 head of gestating Limousin cows.

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As more corn is used for ethanol, byproduct becomes livestock feed

Faith Bremer

Poughkeepsie Journal

Ethanol producers will use about a quarter of the U.S. corn crop this year, an amount that alarms ranchers and poultry producers who depend on corn to feed their animals.

As the demand for corn and energy costs climb, so do prices at the grocery store.

But the ethanol industry’s impact on the nation’s supply of corn for feed isn’t as dramatic as it may seem.

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Edisto Center to hold Fall Field Day

The Times and Democrat

From peanuts and beef cattle to soybeans and cotton, Clemson University’s Edisto Research and Education Center will open its fields from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4, for the annual agricultural showcase.

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Don’t sell your cattle, market your beef

High Plains Journal

We are in a continuously changing cattle business. With collaboration from several sectors of the industry, the Colorado BQA Program and Colorado Beef Council will host cattle producer meetings throughout Colorado addressing current issues and trends affecting our evolving beef marketplace. Please plan to attend these sessions in Burlington (Sept. 10), Akron (Sept. 11), Alamosa (Sept. 13), Durango (Sept. 23), and Rocky Ford (Sept. 24).

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Court decides no mad-cow testing allowed

MATT APUZZO

Pueblo Cheiftan

One beef company wants to test its meat, but large beef firms don’t want the competition.

The Bush administration can prohibit meat packers from testing their animals for mad cow disease, a federal appeals court said Friday.

The dispute pits the Agriculture Department, which tests about 1 percent of cows for the potentially deadly disease, against a Kansas meat packer that wants to test all its animals.

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