Monthly Archives: August 2008

Southwest Stocker Cattle Conference Sept. 30 in Lawton

Donald Stotts,

Southwest Farm Press

Stocker cattle operators are facing a unique year, but help is available in determining answers to the coming non-traditional management scenarios by attending the 6th annual Southwest Stocker Cattle Conference on Sept. 30.

The conference will take place at the Great Plains Technology Center, located at 4500 SW Lee Blvd. in Lawton. Conference sign-in will begin at 8:45 a.m. with sessions starting at 9:15 a.m. and finishing at approximately 2 p.m.

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New tool helps producers calculate TB test costs

Tri State Neighbor

The University of Minnesota Extension beef team and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture have developed a spreadsheet to help producers determine additional costs of preparing feeder calves to meet bovine tuberculosis requirements for marketing.

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Noninfectious Causes Of Calf Scours

cattlenetwork.com

Noninfectious causes are best defined as flaws in management which appear as nutritional shortcomings, inadequate environment, insufficient attention to the newborn calf, or a combination of these. The most commonly encountered noninfectious problems include: (a) Inadequate nutrition of the pregnant dam, particularly during the last third of gestation. Both the quality and quantity of colostrum are adversely affected by shortchanging the pregnant dam in energy and protein. Deficiencies in vitamins A and E have been associated with greater incidence of calf scours.

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Gas prices concern booming hay industry

KSWO

As worldwide demand for American hay grows, many producers and distributors are transporting it farther from where it is grown to those who need it.  With high gas prices, and diesel, farmers and distributors tried trains instead of trucks to transport it, but that slows the transport process.  The Oklahoma Wheat Commission says the state has mounds of grain waiting to be shipped, and there currently are not enough rail cars to carry it all.  There is a large harvest expected this fall – Could the situation get worse?  Could the hay surplus be wasted?

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K-State Steer Futurity Program to be offered

Delta George

The Fort Scott Tribune

This year cattleman in Kansas will have an opportunity to participate in a steer futurity provided by K-State Research and Extension. The K-State Wildcat Steer futurity is an educational program designed to provide Kansas beef cattle producers with the opportunity to experience the cattle feeding industry. Producers will not only learn about feeding in a commercial cattle feeding facility, but will also discover the performance potential of their cattle and be able to evaluate the impacts of management practices.

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Grazing Workshops Will Offer Classroom & Hands-On Learning Opportunity

cattlenetwork.com

Livestock and wildlife producers, land managers and others interested in learning more about managing and optimizing their grazing lands will have an opportunity at one of five workshops being held throughout Texas from Sept. 3 to Oct. 1, 2008. “My Piece of Texas” grazing schools will teach attendees how to estimate forage production, determine grazeable acres and set proper stocking rates as well as learn valuable grazing management principles.

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North Carolina Field Day Set for September 13

Cattle Today

North Carolina Angus enthusiasts are encouraged to attend the 2008 North Carolina Angus Association field day at Primus Genetics, Millers Creek, N.C. Event attendees will enjoy food and fellowship at this year’s event, which features a discussion panel on “Improving the Bottom Line for Angus Producers.” The event begins at 10 a.m.

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Farmers keep selling herds at auction while suffering from drought

WATE

During the height of the drought last year, area farmers were so desperate they were selling off their cattle to make ends meet. They couldn’t afford to feed them. This year, things aren’t much better.

Not only did the price of grain skyrocket, but because of the dry conditions, farmers also had to contend with a major hay shortage.

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Texas A&M meat science expert explains health advantages of high quality beef

Tri-State Neighbor

Marbling has become one of the least understood concepts in the beef-consuming world. No wonder, with all the competing and contradictory messages from “experts.”

If your blood test shows low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels have jumped, most doctors and nutritionists say cut back on red meat – especially highly marbled beef.

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Nebraska Angus Tour set for Sept. 19-21

The Fence Post

The Nebraska Angus Association (NAA) will host its 2008 tour, September 19-21 in the North Platte area. Angus enthusiasts are encouraged to attend the event, which will include ranch tours, producer displays and speakers.

The tour will kick-off at 7:00 p.m., Friday, September 19, at the Holiday Inn Express & Convention Center in North Platte. Evening events will include a program with hors d’oeurves and refreshments. Bill Rishel will give a presentation on the history of the Beef Checkoff.

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Sort young cows from mature cows

Dr. Glenn Selk, Extension Cattle Specialist, Oklahoma State University

      First calf heifers have historically been the toughest females on the ranch to get rebred.  They are being asked to continue to grow, produce milk, repair the reproductive tract, and have enough stored body energy (fat) to return to heat cycles in a short time frame.  Two-year old cows must fill all of these energy demands at a time when their mouth is going through the transition from baby teeth to adult teeth.

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Creep Feeding Beef Calves

Dan E. Eversole, Extension Animal Scientist; Virginia Tech

Creep feeding is the managerial practice of supplying supplemental feed (usually concentrates) to the nursing calf. Feed is provided in a creep feeder or some type of physical barrier, which prevents cows from having access to the supplemental feed (Figure 1). Milk from a lactating beef cow furnishes only about 50 percent of the nutrients that a 3-4 month-old calf needs for maximum growth. The remaining nutrients must come from elsewhere if the calf is to realize its genetic potential for growth.

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8 Guidelines to Economical Ingredient Selections

BEEF Magazine

With volatile feed costs, it is an increasing challenge for producers to manage their bottom line. Selecting the right ingredients has always been essential in providing animals with proper nutrition. Now, making the correct ingredient decisions is even more critical for operations to stay as efficient as possible. By making well-informed ingredient decisions, producers are able to keep their animals healthy and garner more dollars down the road.

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Q&A: Raising breeding bulls, what should their daily diet consist of as far as protein and what amounts as far as grain fed bulls?

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

A:   There are a number of different way to manage yearling bulls. Bulls will reach puberty when they are 12 to 14 months of age, which is determined by their ability to produce viable sperm. Depending on breed, bulls will weigh between 1150 to 1300 pounds at first breeding they will loose as much as 200 pounds during the first breeding season and will need to achieve about 75% of their mature weight by their second birth date.

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Feedlot Numbers Continue to Shrink

Hoosier AG Today

  The USDA’s new count on the number of cattle and calves in feedlots shows that the cattle industry may be shrinking more than thought.

Agriculture Department livestock analyst Joel Greene says that August feedlot numbers were down 4 percent from a year ago and a full 9 percent from two years ago and that the number of cattle placed in feedlots in July, about 1.6 million, was the second lowest July number on record

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Basic Requirements

Matt Hersom

Angus Journal

Meeting the basic nutrient requirements of beef cows is a key component of meeting cow herd production and profitability goals for the beef cattle enterprise. Adequate nutrition is vital for adequate cow reproduction, cow and calf health, and growth of all classes of cattle. Nutrient requirements of cattle change throughout the year based upon stage of the production cycle, age, sex, breed, level of activity, pest load and environment.

All of these factors have an additive effect on the nutrient requirements of cattle. In all cases, specific adjustments to the standard nutrient requirements may be warranted. Therefore, it is imperative that cattle producers have an adequate understanding of the basic nutrient requirements of the cow herd to make informed and effective nutrition-related decisions.

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Video Feature: Virginia Farm Bureau – Record Cattle in Va.

Many would be surprised to find out that Virginia’s beef cattle industry has increased significantly this year. Norm Hyde explains why this trend is going on in Virginia. More at www.vafb.com.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKk5xOfFiI4

 

Early Calf Weaning Could Be Cost-Control Strategy

Angus E-List

High fuel and feed costs are pressuring beef producers’ bottom lines, but there are options to help relieve the financial pressure, a Kansas State University (K-State) researcher told producers at K-State’s Beef Conference Aug. 7-8 in Manhattan, Kan.

“Early weaning is a cost-control strategy that beef producers might consider,” said cow-calf nutrition specialist K.C. Olson. Producers may think of early weaning as a last resort, Olson said, but a better approach is to consider the strategy before the situation is dire.

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AMI: FSIS Issues HIKE Scenario On Cattle In Chute & Drive Alleys

cattlenetwork.com

The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has issued Humane Interactive Knowledge Exchange (HIKE) Scenario 04-08: Cattle in Chute and Drive Alleys.

This scenario gives advice and instruction on how inspectors should verify that cattle in drive alleys are being treated humanely.

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$87.5 Million Aids Producers Protecting Convervation Uses After Floods and Drought

Cattle Today

Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer announced that farmers and ranchers will receive USDA funding to repair land damage created by natural disasters in 34 states since September 2007.

Producers will use the $87.5 million in Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) funding for removal of farmland debris, restoring fences and repairing conservation structures which were caused or damaged by floods, and for carrying out emergency water conservation measures in response to severe drought.

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