Monthly Archives: August 2008

Rotational grazing focus of pasture tour

WILLIAM PERSSON

Americanfarm.com

When Abigail Jones started talking, she brought up the cryptic, silly sounding notion of “Donkey-Days.”

Though the interest of some of the attendees seemed to start fading at that, they had come back to rapt attention by the time Jones had outlined the concept.

All else being equal, she said, if you grazed 100 donkeys on one-acre of pasture for one day and one donkey on one acre for 100 days, which acre of pasture would be the most stressed?

The answer: The acre with one donkey for 100 days.

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USDA Initiate Complete Ban on Downer Cattle

Thebeefsite.com

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has announced a proposed rule to amend the Federal meat inspection regulations to initiate a complete ban on the slaughter of cattle that become non-ambulatory after initial inspection by Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) inspection program personnel.

According to the USDA, this proposed rule follows the May 20 announcement by Secretary of Agriculture Ed Schafer to remove the provision that states that FSIS inspection program will determine the disposition of cattle that become non-ambulatory disabled after they have passed ante-mortem, before slaughter, inspection on a case-by-case basis. Under the proposed rule, all cattle that are non-ambulatory disabled at any time prior to slaughter, including those that become non-ambulatory disabled after passing ante-mortem inspection, will be condemned and properly disposed of.

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Ranchers discuss future of industry

MONICA SPRINGER

Garden City Telegram

Although area cattle producers voiced concern about the industry Wednesday at the Wheatlands Convention Center, one Finney County producer had something positive to say. The rest of the group agreed.

"The future has a lot of hope and brightness to it," said Sam Hands, who farms in southern Finney County.

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Q&A: What is the average shrink on corn silage pile that is tarped with a cement base and dirt walls? The pile will be about 250 tons.

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

A:   This is not an easy question to answer – – it depends. The literature suggests that the range in shrink for corn silage in the bunker is 6% to 18%.

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Beef Processing Plant Clears First Hurdle

Tulare Voice

The opposition stayed home during the first round of public hearings on the proposed beef slaughterhouse and processing plant proposed for 90 acres adjacent to the city’s wastewater treatment plant.

After listening to seven people speak in favor of the project, the Planning Commission approved a conditional use permit for the facility and recommended the City Council approve general plan and zoning amendments that would allow Western Pacific Meat Packing to build the project.

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Forage Harvesting in 3 Scenarios

theBeefsite.com

As Autumn approaches, a University of Illinois Extension dairy specialist has outlined three scenarios for the harvesting of forage.

"We have plenty of late-planted corn and soybeans which could be nipped by an early frost," said Mike Hutjens. "It is important that dairy producers understand the alternatives and strategies should this occur."

The first scenario involves late-corn silage. The main differences will be yield (tons of dry matter per acre) and starch content.

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Overgrazing Alters Pasture Plant Composition

cattlenetwork.com

Range managers have long known that overgrazing changes the plant composition of pastures.

As a result, plant species are referred to as increasers, decreasers or invaders. This is a reference to their reaction to years of overgrazing (generally by cattle as opposed to sheep).

By knowing how a few common species react to grazing and monitoring their abundance in pastures, managers can improve forage quality, quantity and, consequently, profits," says Chuck Lura, rangeland specialist at North Dakota State University’s Central Grasslands Research Extension Center near Streeter.

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