Daily Archives: August 28, 2008

Video Feature: Dr. Keith Johnson-How to Use a Grazing Stick

Dr. Keith Johnson show how to use a grazing stick to estimate the amount of usable forage available n a pasture.

Health Management of Newly-Arrived Beef Cattle into a Backgrounding/Stocker Operation

E.J. Richey & D.L. Prichard

University of Florida

Backgrounding (a stocker operation) describes a management system where recently weaned calves or yearling cattle are grazed for a period of time before they are placed in the feed yard. After they reach a desired size, or at the end of the "grazing" season, they are sorted into uniform loads or pen-size lots and placed in a feedlot. Sounds rather simple, but in reality, the successful management of a backgrounding operation can be rather complex. Backgrounding is a part of the cattle industry that most cow/calf operators and veterinarians are not comfortable with, especially when dealing with the problems of health management in backgrounding cattle.

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Everything You Need to Know About Steak

Francine Maroukian

Esquire

A man should know his meat. We can help. We tell you everything you need to know on steak types, grades and cooking times.

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Meat’s Contribution to Global Warming

‘The Cow Is a Climate Bomb’

Michaela Schiessl and Christian Schwägerl

Der Spiegel

Editor’s note: Stories of this ilk are included in the blog to inform those in our industry how agriculture is being presented to and perceived by the public.

Whether cattle are reared organically or with conventional farming methods, the end effect is bad for the environment, according to a new German consumer report. The agricultural lobby, however, is preventing politicians from tackling this massive source of greenhouse gas emissions.

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Forage Focus – Using Low Quality Hay

cattlenetwork.com

Producing high quality hay depends upon cutting the forage plant at a vegetative stage and then getting enough dry sunny days to allow the plants to dry, ideally, to 15 to 18 percent moisture content before baling. While the frequent rainfalls we received earlier this year was good for forage growth, it also hindered quality hay production. Many hayfields were cut at a full bloom or later stage of development. Remember that for any grass or legume plant quality as measured by crude protein, energy and digestibility declines as the plant matures. It looks like hay supplies in terms of quantity are in good shape this year, but quality, particularly of first cutting hay, is generally low.

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Southwest Stocker Cattle Conference Sept. 30 in Lawton

Donald Stotts,

Southwest Farm Press

Stocker cattle operators are facing a unique year, but help is available in determining answers to the coming non-traditional management scenarios by attending the 6th annual Southwest Stocker Cattle Conference on Sept. 30.

The conference will take place at the Great Plains Technology Center, located at 4500 SW Lee Blvd. in Lawton. Conference sign-in will begin at 8:45 a.m. with sessions starting at 9:15 a.m. and finishing at approximately 2 p.m.

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New tool helps producers calculate TB test costs

Tri State Neighbor

The University of Minnesota Extension beef team and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture have developed a spreadsheet to help producers determine additional costs of preparing feeder calves to meet bovine tuberculosis requirements for marketing.

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Noninfectious Causes Of Calf Scours

cattlenetwork.com

Noninfectious causes are best defined as flaws in management which appear as nutritional shortcomings, inadequate environment, insufficient attention to the newborn calf, or a combination of these. The most commonly encountered noninfectious problems include: (a) Inadequate nutrition of the pregnant dam, particularly during the last third of gestation. Both the quality and quantity of colostrum are adversely affected by shortchanging the pregnant dam in energy and protein. Deficiencies in vitamins A and E have been associated with greater incidence of calf scours.

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Gas prices concern booming hay industry

KSWO

As worldwide demand for American hay grows, many producers and distributors are transporting it farther from where it is grown to those who need it.  With high gas prices, and diesel, farmers and distributors tried trains instead of trucks to transport it, but that slows the transport process.  The Oklahoma Wheat Commission says the state has mounds of grain waiting to be shipped, and there currently are not enough rail cars to carry it all.  There is a large harvest expected this fall – Could the situation get worse?  Could the hay surplus be wasted?

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K-State Steer Futurity Program to be offered

Delta George

The Fort Scott Tribune

This year cattleman in Kansas will have an opportunity to participate in a steer futurity provided by K-State Research and Extension. The K-State Wildcat Steer futurity is an educational program designed to provide Kansas beef cattle producers with the opportunity to experience the cattle feeding industry. Producers will not only learn about feeding in a commercial cattle feeding facility, but will also discover the performance potential of their cattle and be able to evaluate the impacts of management practices.

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Grazing Workshops Will Offer Classroom & Hands-On Learning Opportunity

cattlenetwork.com

Livestock and wildlife producers, land managers and others interested in learning more about managing and optimizing their grazing lands will have an opportunity at one of five workshops being held throughout Texas from Sept. 3 to Oct. 1, 2008. “My Piece of Texas” grazing schools will teach attendees how to estimate forage production, determine grazeable acres and set proper stocking rates as well as learn valuable grazing management principles.

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North Carolina Field Day Set for September 13

Cattle Today

North Carolina Angus enthusiasts are encouraged to attend the 2008 North Carolina Angus Association field day at Primus Genetics, Millers Creek, N.C. Event attendees will enjoy food and fellowship at this year’s event, which features a discussion panel on “Improving the Bottom Line for Angus Producers.” The event begins at 10 a.m.

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Farmers keep selling herds at auction while suffering from drought

WATE

During the height of the drought last year, area farmers were so desperate they were selling off their cattle to make ends meet. They couldn’t afford to feed them. This year, things aren’t much better.

Not only did the price of grain skyrocket, but because of the dry conditions, farmers also had to contend with a major hay shortage.

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Texas A&M meat science expert explains health advantages of high quality beef

Tri-State Neighbor

Marbling has become one of the least understood concepts in the beef-consuming world. No wonder, with all the competing and contradictory messages from “experts.”

If your blood test shows low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels have jumped, most doctors and nutritionists say cut back on red meat – especially highly marbled beef.

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Nebraska Angus Tour set for Sept. 19-21

The Fence Post

The Nebraska Angus Association (NAA) will host its 2008 tour, September 19-21 in the North Platte area. Angus enthusiasts are encouraged to attend the event, which will include ranch tours, producer displays and speakers.

The tour will kick-off at 7:00 p.m., Friday, September 19, at the Holiday Inn Express & Convention Center in North Platte. Evening events will include a program with hors d’oeurves and refreshments. Bill Rishel will give a presentation on the history of the Beef Checkoff.

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