Daily Archives: August 25, 2008

Video Feature: Dr. Larry Corah: Are We Filling the Demand for Quality Beef?

Dr. Larry Corah, Vice President, Certified Angus Beef, discusses filling the need for quality beef in the age of feeding ethanol co-products. Recorded at the 2007 Beef Quality Summit, Omaha, NE.

Don’t Mess With Mold

Ed Haag

Angus Journal

The technicians manning the bull test station at the AI Cooperative, Sisämaan Jalostus, in Hollola, Finland, were more than a little perplexed by the sudden drop in semen quality in fall 1998. The daily quality control regimen, based on subjective motility and sperm morphology of all young bulls entering the semen collection program, had been in place long enough for staff to recognize that something external was influencing the semen quality. During the next five months, the number of rejected ejaculates and discarded frozen semen batches due to poor motility increased, as did the number of all forms of abnormal spermatozoa.

All investigations pointed to a single likely cause. After a very wet summer in Finland the forage hay fed at the artifi cial insemination (AI) station was visibly moldy. When it was tested using immunoassay and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), Fusarium mycotoxins HT-2 and T-2 were detected.

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Q&A: When feeding wet distillers grain, at what level do you feel you need to add supplemental thiamine?

Dr. Galen Erickson, Assistant Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

A:   There are a few trials that suggest thiamine helps with diets high in sulfur. However, feeding thiamine will not solve all the problems. The data are inconclusive on just how big of an impact feeding thiamine has on S-induced polio. With that said, I would recommend adding thiamine at 150 to 200 mg per head daily when total S in the diet gets to 0.35% of diet DM. This assumes that the water is clean and low in sulfates. We always recommend having a fairly recent water analysis for S.

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Forage Testing — A Key Decision Aide in 2008

cattlenetwork.com

Oklahoma producers find themselves out of their "comfort zone" as they go into the winter of 2008.  Many have adequate forage supplies.   However quality of the hay may be different than in the past.  Because of low, or no fertilizer applications, and because custom hay crews were over-booked and later than usual, the grass hay quality likely is not as good as in previous years.  In some spotty areas, the hay may have been soaked with a heavy rain while still on the field or in the windrow.

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FDA Pussyfoots On Food Irradiation

Joe Roybal

Beef Magazine

The hope for widespread irradiation of the nation’s ground beef supply received a boost this week with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of the use of irradiation immediately on spinach and iceberg lettuce. But it was a disappointing baby step as the agency apparently acted just enough to mollify critics of its inaction and keep critics of the technology at bay.

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Age verification for cattle key to future success of industry

RIC SWIHART

Lethbridge Herald

Mandatory age verification for Alberta cattle is coming.

Opposed by Alberta Beef Producers and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, age verification is one of the keys to the future of global cattle marketing, an industry spokesman said Friday.

Jeff Kucharski, a career global market development specialist who worked for Alberta Agriculture, said the Alberta Animal Health Act will be changed this fall or winter to make age verification mandatory for all provincial cattle.

It is part of the mandate of Kucharski’s new Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency, created from the Alberta livestock and meat strategy developed after extensive consultation with all levels of the provincial cattle and meat marketing value chain in the past year.

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Official COOL rules finally revealed

The Daily Graphic

Under discussion for a long time, the rules on country of origin labelling (COOL) were finally released on July 28 with a 60-day comment period.

COOL is mandatory country of origin labeling for beef, pork, lamb, chicken, goat and nuts (covered commodities).

It is a retail labeling law only and doesn’t apply to restaurant or food service. Processed, smoked, cured, cooked, fried, baked etc. foods such as sausage, hams or breaded veal are exempt. COOL will apply to the commodities produced or packaged after Sept. 30.

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Producers honored for Beef Quality Assurance commitment

High Plains Journal

Quality. It’s not only a word written in an instruction manual but a responsible action–one must live it and then teach it. That was the underlying theme in mid-July as two producers were honored with the national Beef Quality Assurance award, created to recognize outstanding beef and dairy producers from across the country who incorporate BQA principles as part of the day-to-day activities on their operations. The winners were selected based upon their commitment to beef quality assurance while operating sustainable cattle operations.

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Farmers see ‘more money invested, more money lost’ during drought

John Boyle

Citizen-Times

For most people in the mountains, the persistent drought has been, at most, an inconvenience — they can’t water their lawns or wash their cars.

But for local farmers, the lack of rain translates into a serious financial hit.

“We’re having a really bad time of it,” said Laurie Cammarata, who runs Red-Tail Ridge Farm, a beef and poultry operation in the Beaverdam area of Buncombe County. “We’ve been feeding hay since the beginning of July, and every time we throw out a bale of hay, it’s ‘ching-ching,’” she said, making a sound like a cash register. “We didn’t cut any hay this year or last year, and usually we get about 500 bales. Our pastures just didn’t produce any.”

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Cattle feeding workshop to be held on Sept. 2

Nonpareil Online

A special one-day workshop will be held at the Iowa State University Armstrong Research Farm near Lewis on Tuesday, Sept. 2, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to help producers and allied industry representatives explore cattle feeding opportunities in southwest Iowa.

The program will have presenters and a tour of cattle feeding facilities located on the farm. Dave Nichols, Adair County beef seedstock producer, will provide insights on the Iowa advantage for cattle feeding. Joe Lally, ISU program specialist and Heartland Regional Water Coordination Initiative nutrient specialist, will address getting the most from your beef manure nutrients – legal, environmental and economic considerations.

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Beef So Fresh, It Came From Just Down the Road

New York Times

IT is Saturday night at the White Hart Inn in Salisbury, and the burgers are pouring out of the kitchen, whole tables at a time. They’ve been a mainstay for at least the last 20 of this historic inn’s 202 years — but never quite in this way. Since Aug. 1, the White Hart’s hamburgers and steaks have come from grass-fed, free-range cattle raised four miles up the road.

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Managing the genetics of beef cow herds

Miles Dabovich, Texas AgriLife Extension agent, agriculture, Wichita County

High Plains Journal

To manage the genetics of beef cow herds, producers should consider several factors in a logical sequence. These factors are production conditions and markets, types of cattle, breeding systems, breeds, and selection of individual breeding animals.

Production conditions and markets

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R-CALF USA: Canadian BSE concerns drop U.S. cattle prices

The Prairie Star

Bloomberg News reported on Tuesday that, “Cattle fell to the lowest price this month on speculation that export demand for U.S. beef will slow after neighboring Canada last week reported its 14th case of mad cow disease since 2003…”

“There’s a little concern long term that some Pacific Rim countries may associate Canada with us,” said Lane Broadbent, vice president of KIS Futures Inc. in Oklahoma City, the article states. “We’re closely associated as a trading partner and we’re bringing in some cattle from Canada as well.

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USDA Celebrates Opening of U.S. Beef to Costa Rica, Belize and Qatar

Grainnet

Fargo, ND— Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer on August 20 reviewed the success from recent openings of U.S. beef markets into Costa Rica, Belize, Qatar and Ghana recognizing international trade standards for U.S. beef and beef products from cattle of all ages.

"The opening of these diverse markets demonstrates the global appetite for U.S. beef and the understanding and confidence nations place in America’s science-based international standards for safety," said Schafer.

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Cattle-feedlot count declines a 7th month

TONY C. DREIBUS

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

The number of cattle and calves held in U. S. feedlots Aug. 1 fell 4. 2 percent from the prior month, the seventh straight decline, as higher corn prices increase the cost of raising the animals to slaughter weights.

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