Daily Archives: August 21, 2008

Video Feature: Dr. Chad Hart: The outlook for ethanol, corn and beef in the next decade

Dr. Chad Hart, ag economist with the Center for Agriculture and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University, summarizes the most recent update of the CARD outlook on corn and ethanol – production, acreage, crop and feed prices, and the impact on the beef industry. Recorded at the 2007 Beef Quality Summit, Omaha, NE.

 

Powered by Qumana

Effects of Body Condition on Productivity in Beef Cattle

William E. Kunkle, Robert S. Sand, and D. Owen Rae

University of Florida

Introduction

The income and profit of a beef cattle operation is closely related to the rebreeding and reproduction rate of the herd. A 1986 survey of cattle producers in nine counties in central Florida indicated the number of calves sold was only 69 percent of the breeding age beef cows. Of the 284 producers that responded, 48 percent indicated that nutrition was the biggest problem they faced in dealing with cattle reproduction; another 24 percent indicated that parasites were their biggest problem.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Beef, dissected

Lindsey Nair

Roanoke Times

Bottom, top, center, side, round, flat, shoulder, tip.

After staring at a diagram of beef cuts for a half-hour, those terms meandered through my head like Angus cattle shuffling toward the feed bin.

I figured it would be easy to memorize the anatomy of a side of beef, but it was tougher than I had imagined.

Like many butchers, Conrad O’Brien, who runs O’Brien Meats in Salem, has spent more than 35 years perfecting his knowledge. He says many Americans gravitate toward the most familiar cuts, such as rib eyes, strips and chuck roasts, because they know how to prepare them.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

PETA Offers Unusual Ad Deal To DFW Officials

Um, Yeah, We’ll Get Right Back To You On That…

The Aero News Network

PETA, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, sent a letter Monday to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport CEO Jeff Fegan, expressing empathy for the airport’s financial difficulties, and asking to buy advertising space for a provocative message. But PETA wants to put its ads on the inside walls of the airport’s bathroom stalls.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

R-CALF Official Speaks Out Against High-Risk Cattle

KTIC

R-CALF USA President/Region VI Director Max Thornsberry, a Missouri veterinarian who also chairs the group’s animal health committee, charges that the risk of importing BSE cattle into the United States from Canada is substantially greater than what USDA has told the public. Thornsberry’s statement follows the confirmation by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency of the latest BSE case involving a 6-year old Alberta beef cow.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Wholesale beef prices highest leap in years

KTVQ

Rising prices are no surprise, but a recent Labor Department report says wholesale beef prices jumped 7.4% in July, the biggest leap in four years.

But higher wholesale prices do not necessarily translate into windfall profits for cattle producers.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

New Denver cut makes good impression

KTIC

Kansas City chefs showed great interest in one of the new beef value cuts from the chuck roll after a presentation last week by Kansas Beef Council (KBC) staff. The "Denver cut" was well-received by more than 150 members and guests attending the August meeting of the Greater Kansas City Chefs Association. One chef told KBC he definitely will put the cut on the menu, while numerous others were very impressed by the tenderness and flavor of the Denver cut.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Video Feature: Louisiana Farm Bureau: Green Cattle Practices

This Week in Louisiana Agriculture’s Michael Danna introduces us to a cattle farmer who is saving money by using more ecological practices.

 

Drought devastates county’s pastures

Rob Rogers

Marin Independent Journal

No one had to tell George Grossi that drought has wreaked havoc on Marin’s farmers and ranchers this year.

"We have a couple of areas with very little pasture. Cattle could only stay there a very short time, and then I had to feed them hay," the Novato rancher said. "And I was fortunate because I had some lower pastures. Those people who have had to buy a lot of hay may have had to cut cattle in order to get by."

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Q&A: What is cut off date for last cutting of alfalfa? Field was planted 1 year ago and at present regrowth is slightly less than 1/2 of mature height.

Dr. Bruce Anderson, Professor of Agronomy, Agronomy & Horticulture, University of Nebraska

A:   The date you take your last harvest of alfalfa affects its winter survival and next spring’s vigor. Alfalfa needs about six weeks of uninterrupted growth in the fall to become fully winterized. This winterterizing generally begins about three weeks before the average date of first frost. Your last harvest can occur anytime before winterizing begins or after the winterizing period is over with little worry about affecting stand life. But, harvest during winterizing can be risky.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Matching Pasture Quality To Animal Needs

cattlenetwork.com

Now more than ever, it is important to make the most efficient use of our forage resources. Supplemental feed is very costly and must be used judiciously. We need to keep grazing cattle on pasture for as long a period as possible and feed only as necessary. As we do that, we must be sure that we are meeting the nutritional needs of the cows and calves. Most of our pasture systems are based fescue pastures.

The typical production pattern for a cool season perennial like fescue is shown by figure 1. There is very little growth from February 15 to early April and fescue may almost go dormant from late July through August. Thus, these two periods are critical in the management of beef cattle. If adequate grass isn’t available, stored or purchased feed must be utilized.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

NBAF Would Protect Kansas Livestock

Thebeefsite.com

Manhattan and the state of Kansas have a tremendous opportunity to provide essential protection to the livestock industries that are so important to Kansas and the U.S through the NBAF, National Bio and Agro-defense Facility, proposal, writes Bob L. Larson, DVM, Ph.D., professor of clinical sciences at the Kansas State University.

According to him, the NBAF will provide a state-of-the-art facility to do the research necessary to enhance our region’s and the nation’s protection from diseases that could cause tremendous animal suffering and death loss, and extreme financial disruption that would ripple throughout the nation’s economy.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Grass-fed steaks growing in popularity

Pueblo Cheiftan

CATHY THOMAS

When it comes to steak, the focus has generally been on flavor and texture, not the cattle’s dinner. But now that the grass-fed movement is gaining steam, shoppers have a choice: To buy meat from steers that have eaten a 100 percent grass diet, or those that have been fattened in feedlots on grain (specifically corn).

Full Story

Powered by Qumana

Keep the Beef Quality Wheels Turning

 Missouri Ruralist

Cattle are typically transported two to four times during their lives, making travel the second most stressful event for them, next to severe weather. And if careful animal-handling practices are not followed during travel, stress can directly affect beef quality and cost producers money.

The beef checkoff-funded DVD and brochure, "Master Cattle Transporter Guide," illustrates best practices to keep cattle safe and healthy as they move from ranch to rail.

Full Story (Registration may be requested)

Powered by Qumana

Bolze to Lead Center for Beef Excellence; Strengthen Beef Industry

PR Newswire

In an effort to strengthen Pennsylvania’s beef cattle industry, the newly-created Center for Beef Excellence has named a Perry County native as its first executive director, Governor Edward G. Rendell announced today at Penn State’s Ag Progress Days in Centre County.

Dr. Ronald Bolze Jr. brings extensive professional experience to the position, said Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff, having worked in production agriculture, marketing, education and research.  He was selected by the organization’s board of directors.

Full Story

Powered by Qumana