Daily Archives: August 14, 2008

Video Feature: Chant of a Champion, John Korrey

Clip from John Korrey’s Auctioneering DVD “Chant of a Champion”

Total Protein Requirements of Beef Cattle I: Feed the Bugs First

Jeffrey N. Carter

University of Florida

Beef cattle along with many other ruminant animals are unique in the animal kingdom because of their ability to utilize roughages, or fiber. Fiber, however, is not a nutrient. Nutrients include water, protein and/or amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids or fats, minerals, and vitamins.

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Lessons learned showing cattle

Kindra Gordon

Cattle Business Weekly

Having grown up showing cattle through 4-H and FFA, August always brings fond memories of county and state fairs. Although it has been many years since I’ve felt the thrill of leading a steer into the show ring for competition, I know that many of the lessons I learned during my showing days are still with me.

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Restricted Feeding Of Heifers During Postweaning Enhanced Efficiency

cattlenetwork.com

A total of 397 crossbred heifers were used to evaluate the effects of two levels of feeding during the post-weaning period on growth, gain/feed, and ultrasound carcass measurements as well as the associations among these traits. The heifers were assigned to a control diet (fed to appetite) or a restricted diet (80% of that consumed by controls) during a 140-day postweaning period. Heifers were individually fed a diet of 68% corn silage, 18% alfalfa, 8% barley, and 6% protein-mineral supplement (dry matter basis). Ultrasound measurements of loin muscle area (LMA), intramuscular fat (IMF), and subcutaneous fat (SQF) thickness over the LM were made on day 140.

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Get Calves Ready for the Long Haul

Jeffrey N. Carter

University of Florida

Transporting beef calves post weaning to a feedlot facility is quite stressful. Short-term but significant reductions in feed and water intakes can result. Data compiled in Texas feed yards over seven years showed that healthy cattle consumed more feed during the first seven, 28, and 56 days after arrival than their non-healthy counterparts. When feed intakes are low, i.e., less than one percent of body weight, it is nearly impossible to formulate any kind of diet that will adequately meet animal requirements. However, transport-stressed calves will, when given a choice, consume greater quantities of high-energy diets and diets that are higher in concentrates than their unstressed mates. Normal levels of dry matter intake will not be observed until sometime during the third week after arrival which indicates that a 21-day receiving period is optimal.

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Finding the Links Between Genomics & Health

thebeefsite.com

A groundbreaking study at Colorado State University may lead to early identification of animals with less susceptibility to feedlot diseases, especially bovine respiratory disease (BRD).

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August pasture reminders

American Cowman

August is the time to begin to plan for the end of the grazing season, especially if you are hoping to do some pasture improvement.  If you plan to seed some new ground to expand your system, getting the seeding in by the end of August is recommended to reduce competition from weeds and allow the plants to establish a good root system before winter.

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Novartis: Emerging Clostridial Disease Targets Calves

cattlenetwork.com

Clostridium perfringens Type A continues to garner researchers’ attention as a potential emerging pathogen. It’s often associated with severe calf disease, such as abomasitis, with fatality rates varying from 5 to 50 percent.

“There are as many questions about this disease syndrome as there are answers,” says David Van Metre, DVM, College of Veterinary Sciences, Colorado State University. “It’s a multifactorial disease. No one has found the complete set of factors that cause it.”

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Research Shows Marbling Important and Complicated

Cattle Today

To start a lively discussion amongst a group of cattlemen, just utter the word, “marbling.” It’s been called one of the most emotive words in the beef industry. From those who dismiss it as unimportant to the staunch defenders, opinions will vary.

A presentation at the American Society of Animal Science annual meeting earlier this month focused on the science behind the word. Larry Corah, vice president of Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB), shared research related to the value of marbling.

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Pfizer Animal Genetics & NBCEC Finding Links Between Genomics & Cattle Health Traits

AG Professional

A groundbreaking study at Colorado State University may lead to early identification of animals with less susceptibility to feedlot diseases, especially bovine respiratory disease (BRD). "This landmark research is providing us with greater insight into the genetic markers responsible for improved feedlot health, a promising significant breakthrough for the beef industry," says Nigel Evans, Ph.D., Vice President of Pfizer Animal Genetics.

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Author Gene Baur seeks to change attitudes about using animals as food

Justin Head

Peoria Times-Observer

Editor’s note: Stories of this ilk are included in the blog to inform those in our industry how agriculture is being presented to and perceived by the public.

Eating burgers could make glaciers melt faster.

The statement is a bit of a shortcut in logic, but author Gene Baur says it makes the point about issues faced globally.

Bauer explained his views during a recent talk in New York while promoting his new book, “Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food.”

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SNEAK PEEK: Exclusive interview with CEO of JBS USA

MEATPOULTRY.com

Steve Kay

The interview in its entirety will be published in the September issue of M&P and will also be published online at http://www.MEATPOULTRY.com. Below is a glimpse of the report as Batista discusses the importance of fostering positive relationships with U.S. cattle producers.

M&P: What are the ways you have acted in the past year to strengthen your supply lines with U.S. cattle feeders?

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Beef Board Budget Down from 2008

Cattle Today

Centennial, Colo., May 19, 2008 – The Beef Promotion Operating Committee has recommended a $45.8 million Cattlemen’s Beef Board budget for Fiscal 2009, reflecting a sharp 6.6 percent decrease from the $49 million budget for Fiscal 2008.

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King Ranch Executive Urges Ranchers To `Plan for Profitability In Ethanol Era´

cattlenetwork.com

For some ranchers, strategic planning may seem tedious. For others, it may seem something a large corporation – not a working cattle operation – would do. But Texas A&M University – Kingsville´s King Ranch Institute for Ranch Management Executive Director Barry Dunn encourages cattle ranchers to make the time.

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Minicows help farmers with feed costs

Jennifer Levitz

The Wall Street Journal/Myrtle Beach Online

Lots of things are getting downsized in this economy – even cattle.

A year ago, Sally and Warren Coad kept full-size cattle on their farm north of Raleigh. But then, Coad says, the price of feed "skyrocketed." So the couple sold their big cows and replaced them with minicows – cattle that look just like regular cows but grow only about 3 feet tall.

As feed prices drive up the cost of keeping cows, farmers like Sally and Warren Coad say they’ve found that miniature cattle are more cost efficient. Plus, they say, smaller breeds lend themselves to young cow handlers.

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