Daily Archives: August 6, 2008

Video Feature: Oats, turnips, other small grains and annual ryegrass as a double crop.

Brad Shelton describes how to use alternative forages as a double crop

 

Supplement & Vaccinate To Prevent Calf Scours

cattlenetwork.com

The immediate impacts of this winter’s snow storms, including widespread death loss among stranded cattle, have been widely reported. Additional negative effects, however, could emerge this spring as calving season approaches across the Plains region.

Veterinarian Rick Sibbel, director of Global Ruminant Technical Services for Schering Plough Animal Health, notes that when pastures and rangeland are covered with deep snow for extended time, cows can lose body condition quickly. Without adequate supplementation, nutritional deficiencies in the cow herd could lead to calving difficulties and lower quantity and quality of colostrum. 

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Trent Loos: No bull shootin’

High Plains Journal

If you read these columns often, you must have figured out that I spend as much time on the road as I do at home ranching. Since the beginning of 2008, I have spoken to audiences in 28 states and one Canadian province. I am telling you this because the mental struggle I have every day that I have to leave was only worsened by my two weeks at home. Yes, I did actually spend 14 consecutive days at home and it felt awesome. It made it tougher than ever to leave for Florida but I did it anyway. Interestingly, I met up with an old friend I have not seen for four years and suddenly everything seemed to make sense. Derrell Peel, Professor and Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist at Oklahoma State University, was one of the first people I ran into at the American Agriculture Economics Association meeting in Orlando.

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Beef Board Evaluates the Checkoff Program

Cattle Today

There has been much discussion within the beef industry about potential improvements to the Beef Checkoff Program. USDA officials recently spoke with Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB) officers about their responsibility to develop and recommend changes to the Beef Promotion and Research Act and Order to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. 

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The Roseda way

Laurie Savage

Frederick News-Post

Multiple steps go into making mouthwatering steaks and burgers before grills even fire up this summer. Selecting the cut, deciding on the most flavorful marinade ingredients and choosing between coal or gas are only part of the recipe.

At Roseda Beef, a careful program of breeding, feeding and dry-aging combine to produce the best cuts of meat possible before they hit store shelves or even arrive on doorsteps.

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Aiming for price premiums

Compiled by Kindra Gordon from CAB

Cattle Business Weekly

Of course, topping the market is top of mind with producers as the fall calf marketing run draws closer. To that end, University of Illinois animal scientist Dan Faulkner says management is the top factor in ensuring that calves will grade well at harvest – and a lot of that management starts at the ranch.

To illustrate just how paramount management is, Faulkner says data he’s studied indicates management – be it health, vaccination and nutrition protocols – influences cattle quality grade six times more than genetics.

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Beef on the ballot, Local egg and cattle producers worry about initiative’s effects

Laura Brown

The Union

At least one local rancher is worried a state initiative regulating the treatment of farm animals and set to appear before voters this November could add another cost and burdensome regulation to his operation.

Others think the measure could generate a shift in consumer tastes, driving more people to chose small farms over agriculture giants.

The Treatment of Farm Animals Statute would require calves raised for veal, egg-laying hens and pregnant pigs enough space to fully extend their limbs or wings, lie down, stand up and turn around. Penalties include fines of up to $1,000 or 180 days of jail time.

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New beef cuts created for Japan boost U.S. exports

Bryan Salvage

MEATPOULTRY.com

When the United States lost Japan, its No. 1 export market for beef, following its first discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy back in December 2003, it was devastating. Although the Japanese market reopened for beef from cattle 20 months old and younger two years later, the limited number of age-verified cattle reduced U.S. beef exports to Japan in 2007 to less than 9% of the peak volume and roughly 13% of the peak value reached earlier in the decade.

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Expert to train farmers to think like a cow for better handling

Beth Forbes

Purdue News Service/Rushville Republican

A Nebraska veterinarian and researcher will discuss techniques for handling cattle from the cow’s perspective at Purdue University field day Aug. 12 in Bedford.

Rather than forcing cattle in a certain direction, Lynn Locatelli teaches a method of handling that allows the cattle to follow natural instincts.

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Stockpiling forages for fall, winter pasture

Brandon Sears

RichmondRegister

Many cattle producers can take advantage of late summer and early fall growing conditions to obtain high-quality pasture for late fall and early winter grazing. This practice is called stockpiling.

The best grasses for stockpiling are cool-season grasses because they will retain good quality and palatability into winter. Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue are two good grasses most suitable for stockpiling under our growing conditions.

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Multiple-pasture system promotes savings

Pat Kopecki

Wilson County News

Ranchers, like farmers in the state, are contending with the ever-increasing cost of fertilizer and fuel. They are being challenged to find ways to decrease costs to make a profit. One forage management scientist suggests the use of a three-pasture system to reduce winter feeding period.

Ranchers feed hay and provide supplemental feed during the winter months and times of drought. The AgriLife Research and Extension scientists, who identified that Texas is the largest cow-calf producer state in the nation, estimate ranchers’ total costs are less dependent on purchased feed costs than any other production costs. However, feed production may include costs of cutting and baling hay and fertilizing pastures.

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New vaccine great in stress situations

Codi Vallery

Cattle Business Weekly

The first intranasally administered, five-way modified-live virus vaccine for beef and dairy is available now through Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health.

Ninety-five percent of disease-causing agents enter through the nose, causing primary respiratory disease and often secondary infections.

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Cattle Producers Learn How to Maintain Profitability

Thebeefsite.com

Facing a triple threat of high fuel, feed and fertilizer prices, more than 1,400 cattle producers heard from experts at the 54th Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course on ways to maintain profitability.

The event, sponsored by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service, continues through Wednesday on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station.

Dr. Ron Gill, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist from Stephenville, said during Monday’s general session that cattle producers have no control over these costs, but they can control how much of these commodities is used in their operations.

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Cattle Preconditioning: Creep Feeding Before Weaning

cattlenetwork.com

Historically, feeder calf prices decline as weight increases. That relationship of price to weight still exists, but it has narrowed considerably due to the high price of corn and feedlot cost of gain. Feedlots and the market are telling us to make calves heavier at home before selling them as feeder calves.

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Cattle Don’t Have Much To Do With Global Warming

cattlenetwork.com

Since the release of a United Nations (U.N.) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report in 2006, we’ve heard more and more about the carbon footprints and the green house gases generated in livestock production. That report claims that, on a global basis, raising livestock generates more greenhouse gas emissions as measured in carbon dioxide equivalent than use of fossil fuels in driving cars and trucks. This story has appeared over and over again in the media.

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Consumers Find Grass-fed Beef Acceptable

Thebeefsite.com

US – High feed-grain prices and the growing interest in "natural" foods have spurred both consumers and farmers to consider grass-fed beef, and a recent study done by Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences researchers may reinforce this trend.

According to John Comerford, associate professor of dairy and animal science, the study showed that most consumers find the taste and tenderness of grass-fed beef acceptable in blind taste tests. He recommends that producers look for ways to interest more potential customers in grass-fed beef.

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Champions Names at 2008 National Junior Angus Show

Cattle Today

Members of the National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) celebrated “Christmas in July” during the 2008 National Junior Angus Show (NJAS), July 13-19 at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, Iowa. The young exhibitors between the ages of 9- and 21-years-old showcased 1,141 head during the week, which includes 669 owned females, 235 bred-and-owned females, 72 bred-and-owned bulls, 14 bred-and-owned cow-calf pairs, 31 owned cow-calf pairs, 73 steers and 47 carcass steers.

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State Beef Checkoff Referendum Passes Easily

Darryal Ray

Alabama Farmers Federation

Alabama’s 10th Beef Checkoff Referendum since 1962 easily passed again last week as the state’s cattlemen approved renewing the program by an 87 percent margin.

More than 1,100 votes were cast, representing each of Alabama’s 67 counties.

“We’re all glad to see our state checkoff continue," said Orland Britnell, president of the Alabama Cattlemen’s Association and cattle producer from Russellville. "It’s a self-help program we use to hold producer meetings, publish educational materials, train young people and, of course, promote beef.”

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Ivan Rush: Three decades of service to livestock industry, youth, UNL.

David Ostdiek Communications Specialist Panhandle Research and Extension Center

KNEB

Ivan Rush, who retired at the end of July after 34 years as beef specialist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Panhandle Research and Extension Center, says he’s wanted to work with livestock as long as he can remember.

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Changing Times: Management Considerations for Cow-Calf Producers

Dr. Scott P. Greiner, Extension Animal Scientist, Beef, VA Tech

Without question, the landscape of the beef business has changed.  All of us are fully aware of the impact of rising feed, fuel, and fertilizer prices, and much discussion has taken place (and will continue to take place) on how energy, economic, and many other policies and factors will affect our industry.  “How will this impact us in Virginia?” is a primary topic of discussion amongst all of us with a vested interest in Virginia’s beef industry.  While none of us have a crystal ball, the hard facts tell us that annual production costs are up $100-150 per cow for many Virginia producers.

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