Daily Archives: July 23, 2008

Market Now Or Later?

Wes Ishmael

Beef Magazine

In sizing up calf marketing this fall, Dillon Feuz, Utah State University livestock marketing specialist, says there will be some profit opportunities, but they may not come from doing the same things you’ve always done.

“The past two years, anyone forward contracting or selling on video sales for fall delivery early received a better price than waiting for fall sales,” Feuz says. That’s because corn prices rallied the past two falls, depressing calf prices.

Considering weather-induced, later-than-normal corn planting and emergence, projected trend-line yields were already in jeopardy by the first week of June 2008.

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Argentina livestock health bill introduced

Cattle Business Weekly

Three of the regions Senators addressed importing meat products from Argentina this month with new legislations.

Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson, South Dakota Sen. Tim Johnson and Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi recently introduced new legislation prohibiting the importation of certain meat products from any region of Argentina until the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) can certify to Congress the entire country is free of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD).

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Marketing Mistakes

Give your beef business a marketing makeover by avoiding these common mistakes.

Kindra Gordon

Hereford World

With the spring bull sale season complete, perhaps you find yourself breathing a sigh of relief and hoping for a few weeks of downtime — that is, of course, until you need to gear up for fall when female and calf sales move back into full swing.

If this scenario matches your marketing efforts, you are likely overlooking some key steps to maximize your business’s potential. And, even if your marketing goes a few steps beyond the above scenario, chances are you still have marketing improvements that could be made.
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Q&A Can corn silage be fed to two month old Holstein steers? And one general question, when is the earliest that a weaned calf can start nibbling on some pasture?

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

I would not recommend fermented feeds such as corn silage in the diets of young calves (two months of age) being fed a complete diet. The nutrient requirements of these calves is very high and intake is important.

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Cool Those Cattle

Ed Haag

Angus Journal

Heat stress doesn’t just mean lower productivity in beef cows. If not dealt with appropriately, it can be fatal. In 2007 a heat event in northwest South Dakota killed up to 7,000 animals. During the last decade, events of similar magnitude have been recorded in northeast and southeast Nebraska.

These events and the resulting deaths have not gone unnoticed by the staff at the Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) at Clay Center, Neb. The U.S. Department of Agriculture- Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) scientists there were convinced that providing beef producers an accurate forecasting tool specifically designed to predict such heat events would help them explore all their options and launch a timely response.

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Pathogenesis Of BVD Infections

cattlenetwork.com

Acute infection of immunocompetent cattle with BVD can result in a wide range of clinical syndromes. Although not entirely clear, the outcome of an acute infection is probably related to several factors including strain of virus, age of host, immune and physiologic status of the host, and the presence of other pathologic agents.

The majority of acute BVD infections are caused by noncytopathic viruses. Cattle acutely or persistently infected with BVDV are the primary source of virus. Infected animals shed virus in nasal and oral secretions, feces and urine. The primary virus entrance route is probably oral nasally. Other less important routes of entry may include infected semen, biting insects, and contaminated instruments.

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Protozoa Primer

cattlenetwork.com

Back when I was enrolled in Rumen Microbiology, I thought it was just the coolest class. Fellow graduate students approached lab time spent observing the microscopic life of rumen inhabitants with a “well, if we have to.” I, in contrast, was fascinated. There, living in just one ml of rumen fluid, were 1,000 bacteria of various shapes, abilities, and dietary processes; 100 fungi working synergistically with them; and, 100 relatively gargantuan protozoa bullying the neighborhood.

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