Daily Archives: July 23, 2008

Market Now Or Later?

Wes Ishmael

Beef Magazine

In sizing up calf marketing this fall, Dillon Feuz, Utah State University livestock marketing specialist, says there will be some profit opportunities, but they may not come from doing the same things you’ve always done.

“The past two years, anyone forward contracting or selling on video sales for fall delivery early received a better price than waiting for fall sales,” Feuz says. That’s because corn prices rallied the past two falls, depressing calf prices.

Considering weather-induced, later-than-normal corn planting and emergence, projected trend-line yields were already in jeopardy by the first week of June 2008.

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Argentina livestock health bill introduced

Cattle Business Weekly

Three of the regions Senators addressed importing meat products from Argentina this month with new legislations.

Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson, South Dakota Sen. Tim Johnson and Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi recently introduced new legislation prohibiting the importation of certain meat products from any region of Argentina until the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) can certify to Congress the entire country is free of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD).

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Marketing Mistakes

Give your beef business a marketing makeover by avoiding these common mistakes.

Kindra Gordon

Hereford World

With the spring bull sale season complete, perhaps you find yourself breathing a sigh of relief and hoping for a few weeks of downtime — that is, of course, until you need to gear up for fall when female and calf sales move back into full swing.

If this scenario matches your marketing efforts, you are likely overlooking some key steps to maximize your business’s potential. And, even if your marketing goes a few steps beyond the above scenario, chances are you still have marketing improvements that could be made.
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Q&A Can corn silage be fed to two month old Holstein steers? And one general question, when is the earliest that a weaned calf can start nibbling on some pasture?

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

I would not recommend fermented feeds such as corn silage in the diets of young calves (two months of age) being fed a complete diet. The nutrient requirements of these calves is very high and intake is important.

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Cool Those Cattle

Ed Haag

Angus Journal

Heat stress doesn’t just mean lower productivity in beef cows. If not dealt with appropriately, it can be fatal. In 2007 a heat event in northwest South Dakota killed up to 7,000 animals. During the last decade, events of similar magnitude have been recorded in northeast and southeast Nebraska.

These events and the resulting deaths have not gone unnoticed by the staff at the Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) at Clay Center, Neb. The U.S. Department of Agriculture- Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) scientists there were convinced that providing beef producers an accurate forecasting tool specifically designed to predict such heat events would help them explore all their options and launch a timely response.

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Pathogenesis Of BVD Infections

cattlenetwork.com

Acute infection of immunocompetent cattle with BVD can result in a wide range of clinical syndromes. Although not entirely clear, the outcome of an acute infection is probably related to several factors including strain of virus, age of host, immune and physiologic status of the host, and the presence of other pathologic agents.

The majority of acute BVD infections are caused by noncytopathic viruses. Cattle acutely or persistently infected with BVDV are the primary source of virus. Infected animals shed virus in nasal and oral secretions, feces and urine. The primary virus entrance route is probably oral nasally. Other less important routes of entry may include infected semen, biting insects, and contaminated instruments.

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Protozoa Primer

cattlenetwork.com

Back when I was enrolled in Rumen Microbiology, I thought it was just the coolest class. Fellow graduate students approached lab time spent observing the microscopic life of rumen inhabitants with a “well, if we have to.” I, in contrast, was fascinated. There, living in just one ml of rumen fluid, were 1,000 bacteria of various shapes, abilities, and dietary processes; 100 fungi working synergistically with them; and, 100 relatively gargantuan protozoa bullying the neighborhood.

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K-State Southwest Center to Host Field Day in Garden City

KVRN

Kansas State University´s Southwest Research and Extension Center will host its 2008 Field Day Aug. 28 in Garden City. The day will begin with registration from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m. and feature agricultural product displays, as well as field tours in the morning and seminars in the afternoon. Coffee and donuts during registration plus a no-cost lunch will be provided, sponsored by commercial exhibitors. The field tours will be repeated to allow attendees to participate in both, which will include the following topics: oStatus of biological control of field bindweed in Kansas, oManagement of dectes stem borers in soybeans, oA comparison of five herbicides, oPost-emergence grass control in ALS-resistant grain sorghum, oKixor and Huskie herbicides for broadleaf control in grain sorghum, oImpact of volunteer Roundup Ready corn on winter wheat, and oAnnual and perennial biofuel production.

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F.D.A. posts Q&A on cattle-origin materials

Bryan Salvage

MEATPOULTRY.com

The Food and Drug Administration has published a question-and-answer document about the agency’s amendments to regulations that prohibit the use of certain materials that originate from cattle in the food or feed of animals. This document is in response to questions the agency has received about implementation of the rule, which goes into effect April 27, 2009.

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Is Global Warming Building Steam Or Cooling Off?

Troy Marshall

Beef Magazine

Perhaps more than any other scientific issue, global warming has been difficult to assess, primarily because it so quickly became politicized in academia and public discourse. And it quickly evolved into a movement, attracting anti-capitalists, environmentalists and seemingly unrelated activist groups like the anti-trade crowd en route.

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Against grain: No matter how you slice it, cattle that eats grass said to be the tastiest

Clare Howard

Holland Sentinel

Experiencing grass-finished beef is "tasting beef for the first time . . . an all-time high, a thrill" says farmer, Ph.D. and cookbook author Shannon Hayes.

Experiencing grass-finished beef is the right thing to do for your health, says Ron and Brenda Skaggs of Indian Valley Beef in Tiskilwa.

Both perspectives are part of a growing appreciation for beef raised according to the traditional way of production – before growth hormones, antibiotics and feed lots. Understanding the difference between grass-finished beef and grain-fed beef raised in feedlots can start on the 34-acre Indian Valley Beef operation the Skaggs own.

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California: Downer cattle law signed

Sacramento Bee

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed legislation Tuesday to crack down on the sale of downed cattle for human consumption in response to the largest beef recall in U.S. history.

"I am committed to ensuring California’s food supply is safe and secure," Schwarzenegger said in a prepared statement after signing Assembly Bill 2098.

"With today’s action, we are strengthening California’s food safety laws and sending a message that violating these laws will not be tolerated."

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A promising future for cow/calf producers?

If producers can weather elevated production costs, major opportunities may be around the corner.

Jason K. Ahola, University of Idaho

Cattle Business Weekly

It’s amazing to think back about what has happened in the U.S. beef industry over the past 12 months. In addition to major changes in beef packer ownership, production costs seem to have spiraled out of control.

For instance, today’s $7-8/bu corn is more than double its year-ago price of about $3.50/bu. In fact, corn recently increased about 9% in a single week! Hay in most parts of the country is also substantially higher than last year’s elevated prices. Add onto that diesel today at about $4.65/gal, which dwarfs the $2.85/gal we were paying in July of 2007.

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Cattle Fly Control: Face Fly Biology

cattlenetwork.com

Face flies are about 20 percent larger than house flies, being slightly longer and more robust. The adults are active from early spring to late autumn with only females normally being found on cattle and horses. Males frequent and feed on pollen produced by flowering vegetation. At night, both sexes are found resting on inanimate objects.

The face fly overwinters as an adult, hibernating in protected places such as building lofts and attics. Here, they can become a serious domestic pest by crawling on walls, windows and floors during winter warm spells and when they become active just before leaving the hibernation site. The flies mate shortly after becoming active in early spring. During this time flies congregate in sunny spots on high buildings near ventilator opening or cracks and crevices.

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Bring plant and beef questions to Extension experts at July 26 Farmer’s Market

Montana State University

Montana State University Extension’s booth at the Saturday July 26 Farmers’ Market at the Gallatin County Fairgrounds will feature a plant pathologist and beef cattle specialist to answer questions.

Nina Zidack, MSU Extension plant pathologist, will be available to answer questions about plant diseases. John Paterson, MSU Extension beef cattle specialist, will answer questions about beef, such as the differences between "natural" and "organic" designations.

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