Daily Archives: July 15, 2008

Market Now Or Later?

Market Now Or Later?

Wes Ishmael

Beef Magazine

In sizing up calf marketing this fall, Dillon Feuz, Utah State University livestock marketing specialist, says there will be some profit opportunities, but they may not come from doing the same things you’ve always done.

“The past two years, anyone forward contracting or selling on video sales for fall delivery early received a better price than waiting for fall sales,” Feuz says. That’s because corn prices rallied the past two falls, depressing calf prices.

Considering weather-induced, later-than-normal corn planting and emergence, projected trend-line yields were already in jeopardy by the first week of June 2008.

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Delay Implant, Increase Beef Quality

Delay Implant, Increase Beef Quality

CAB Partners

Many feeders administer growth implants on the front end of the finishing phase, keeping far from the harvest date so as not to hinder marbling development. But research at South Dakota State University in the mid-1990s proved marbling is a consistent component that can develop throughout an animal’s life. Therefore, early management decisions affect marbling development, both ongoing and later. Using a delayed implant strategy leads to the same percentage of cattle grading Choice as non-implanted cattle—but with added weight and efficiency.

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Self-fed Supplements for Range Cattle

Self-fed Supplements for Range Cattle

John Paterson, Extension Beef Specialist

Background

During the late summer and early fall months, range grasses are deficient in both crude protein and energy for cows in lactation. Because of limited forage quantity and (or) quality, supplemental feeding of protein-energy, minerals and vitamins is practiced by the producer. Nationally, the USDA estimated that ninety four percent of cattle producers utilized pasture or crop residues, while 83% fed hay from November to March and, 49% provided supplements.

The overarching goal of supplementing beef cattle is to provide nutrients that are lacking in the basal diet and to increase the intake and digestibility of lower quality forages and crop residues. It is evident that reproduction is impacted the most by nutrient deficiencies. Table 1 partially summarizes the consequences of inadequate intake of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals by beef cattle and lays the foundation as to why supplementation is often necessary.

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Montana State University’s software calculates the profitability of putting steers or heifers on summer pasture.

Montana State University’s software calculates the profitability of putting steers or heifers on summer pasture.

University of Minnesota

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Infectious Diseases that Affect Cattle Fertility

Infectious Diseases that Affect Cattle Fertility

Nolan R. Hartwig, DVM, Iowa State University

Introduction:

Calving percentage, the number of calves weaned divided by the number of females exposed to bulls the previous year, is the most important production parameter that can be measured. The first priority of cow/calf health and production programs should be to emphasize reproduction.

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Q&A Should you feed grain to beef cattle before slaughter?Is it best? How long before slaughter?

Q&A Should you feed grain to beef cattle before slaughter?Is it best? How long before slaughter?

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

There are forage finished beef that do not receive grain. It usually take a longer period of time to finish these cattle (harvested at a specific weight or a specific backfat) as average daily gain is lower for forage finished diets. Forage finised diets will have yellow colored fat due to the carotene in foages. Most cattle in the United States are grain finished as there is an increase in efficiency of gain.

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Justice Department Takes Its Time Reviewing JBS Deal

Justice Department Takes Its Time Reviewing JBS Deal

Bill Jackson

My Cattle

This may come as a surprise, but the federal government doesn’t always work real quick.

Take the Department of Justice, just as an example.

JBS S.A., the parent company of JBS Swift & Co. of Greeley, announced back in early March that it had reached an agreement to buy National Beef of Kansas City, the Smithfield Beef Group of Green Bay, Wis., and Five Rivers Ranch Cattle Feeding, which is headquartered in Loveland.

It would make JBS Swift & Co. the largest of its kind in the United States, hopping over Tyson Foods of Springdale, Ark., and Cargill Meat Solutions of Wichita, Kan., which are Nos. 1 and 2 terms of the number of beef plants and daily slaughter capacity. Swift is third, while National is fourth and Smithfield fifth.

That got the attention of the Justice Department, which must approve or deny the deal, based on what it may or may not do to competition.

That review has been under way for about five months.

FULL STORY

Justice Department Takes Its Time Reviewing JBS Deal

Justice Department Takes Its Time Reviewing JBS Deal

Bill Jackson

My Cattle

This may come as a surprise, but the federal government doesn’t always work real quick.

Take the Department of Justice, just as an example.

JBS S.A., the parent company of JBS Swift & Co. of Greeley, announced back in early March that it had reached an agreement to buy National Beef of Kansas City, the Smithfield Beef Group of Green Bay, Wis., and Five Rivers Ranch Cattle Feeding, which is headquartered in Loveland.

It would make JBS Swift & Co. the largest of its kind in the United States, hopping over Tyson Foods of Springdale, Ark., and Cargill Meat Solutions of Wichita, Kan., which are Nos. 1 and 2 terms of the number of beef plants and daily slaughter capacity. Swift is third, while National is fourth and Smithfield fifth.

That got the attention of the Justice Department, which must approve or deny the deal, based on what it may or may not do to competition.

That review has been under way for about five months.

FULL STORY

LMIC: Cattle Byproduct Values Hit New Highs

LMIC: Cattle Byproduct Values Hit New Highs

cattlenetwork.com

The byproduct value is the total value of all non-meat items such as the heart, hide/skin, and tallow that is gathered from a slaughter animal. Foreign consumers have a greater demand for such byproduct items than U.S. consumers; therefore many of these products are exported. The value of many byproduct items, particularly tallows have skyrocketed due to spillover demand from the oil and feedstuff sectors. The byproduct value as well as values for each non-meat item is reported by USDA-AMS on a weekly basis.

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Santa Gertrudis Breeders International Honors Paschal

Santa Gertrudis Breeders International Honors Paschal

Cattle Today

Santa Gertrudis Breeders International (SGBI) named the first recipient of the SGBI Industry Service Award at its 2008 Annual Meeting held recently in New Orleans, La. This newly created award was presented to Dr. Joe C. Paschal, Professor and Extension Livestock Specialist, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas.

Robert Silva, SGBI Vice-President of Breed Improvement noted that the association felt the need to recognize Dr. Paschal for his life long contributions to the improvement of beef cattle in the areas of breeding, genetics, nutrition, marketing and carcass merit. Dr. Paschal was responsible for the success of the Texas A&M Ranch to Rail Program – South and that program dispelling the idea that all southern cattle were of lower quality.
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Farmers make only 19 cents on every dollar spent for food

Farmers make only 19 cents on every dollar spent for food

JOEL TURNER

Franklin News Post

While some consumers are experiencing sticker shock at the grocery stores, farmers say prices would be even higher if they accurately reflected their increased production costs.

Food prices are rising, but farmers in Franklin County and other areas in Virginia said the prices they receive for their products are not increasing.

Out of every dollar spent on food, the farmer receives only 19 cents, according to the American Farm Bureau.

“It’d s global market more now than ever,” said Spencer Neale, a commodity and marketing specialist for the Virginia Farm Bureau.

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Heineman announces trade efforts

Heineman announces trade efforts

KRVN

Gov. Dave Heineman on Monday announced several agriculture-related activities designed to expand trade opportunities for Nebraska products in three continents. During the next few months, the state’s agriculture industry will be highlighted through policy discussions and promotional events in Hong Kong, Guatemala and Europe. Nebraska also is planning host two trade officials from Cuba during a visit planned for the end of the month.

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ICON concerned about Canadian beef imports

ICON concerned about Canadian beef imports

Robert Pore

The Grand Island Independent

A recent announcement that the 14th case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been detected in native-born Canadian cattle has members of the Independent Cattlemen of Nebraska (ICON) concerned.

“ICON is also concerned with the protection of the United States cattleman, the U.S. consumer and residents of any foreign country purchasing beef produced in the United States,” said Louis Day, ICON board director.

Day said Canada imposed feed bans in l997 that prohibit the grinding and feeding of other ruminants to cattle, but more than half of the Canadian cattle that have been found to be infected with BSE were born after the feed ban was put in place.

FULL STORY

What’s Feedlot Manure Worth As Fertilizer?

cattlenetwork.com

Can manure be turned to gold?

Well, probably not gold, but manure is a potential source of extra income for feedlot owners. And right now there’s a lot of interest in selling feedlot manure to farmers or homeowners as fertilizer, according to Dr. Judson Vasconcelos, UNL feedlot nutrition and management specialist based at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center.

Commercial fertilizer is more expensive than ever. Gary Hergert, extension soils specialist at the Panhandle Center, noted at a recent field day that nitrogen prices have more than doubled in the past two years, while phosphate prices have more than tripled. One factor behind fertilizer prices is increased demand, due partly to the growth in corn acreage for ethanol.

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Beef production environmentally friendly

Louisville Courier Journal

I’m writing in response to a letter The Courier-Journal ran on June 17 titled “Beef perils.” Contrary to the misstated information in the letter, here in the United States, we’re significantly ahead of the world in managing livestock production in an environmentally friendly manner.

Production of food animals in the United States contributes less than 3 percent to total greenhouse gas emissions, compared to fossil fuel combustion, which contributes nearly 80 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to a report from the Environmental Protection Agency.

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