Daily Archives: July 7, 2008

Baxter Black: GRANDPA TOMMY SAVED THE WORLD

We were watching The History Channel at Grandma’s casita. It was a story about the USS Enterprise being attacked. It was 1945. They were describing acts of heroism that occurred. Stories of men risking their lives, staying with wounded comrades instead of swimming to safety. Stories that never made the paper or were recognized but were remembered only by those brave souls who dog-paddled in the waves next to a burning ship 3 miles above the sea floor.

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Q&A I am trying to compare the sales price of wet distillers grain to dry distillers grain…due to water percentage I assume you cannot compare tons to tons . . .do you have a calculator for this?

Dr. Rick Rasby, Professor of Animal Science, Animal Science, University of Nebraska

This is a common question when trying to compare prices of the same feedstuff, but the feedstuffs have different moisture content. The easiest way to compare price is to get both prices to a 100% dry matter basis. This is really quite simple to do but you will need to know the dry matter content. If wet distillers grains is 35% dry matter and 65% moisture (water) priced at $50 per ton at the plant and dry distillers grains is 90% dry matter and 10% moisture priced at $138 per ton at the plant, you have all the components to do the calculations.

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A silage alternative

Baled corn stalks and corn syrup from the ethanol milling process makes a unique silage mix

Kindra Gordon

Cattle Business Weekly

The high cost of feed has lots of beef producers looking for feed alternatives these days. Tim Luther of Lawson, Mo., tried an experiment of his own last summer with his corn crop.

Luther had a corn crop to harvest, but because corn was selling for such a good price, he didn’t want to chop his crop for silage like he has in the past. Thus, he needed to come up with a cheap alternative for roughage to use as winter feed.

Luther began to do his homework, to try and come up with a solution for his lack of roughage. After asking many questions, visiting with nutritionists, and noting how corn condensed distiller’s solubles (CDS) from ethanol plants – or what Luther calls corn syrup – were being used in different operations in Iowa, he decided to try an experiment and see if he could have the best of both worlds.

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Mid-Summer Calf Working, Especially in Tight Times

Dr. W. Dee Whittier, Extension Veterinarian, Cattle, VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

Mid-summer processing of spring-born beef calves is one of the highest return procedures available in the cattle business.  Producers should avoid the temptation to bypass this dividend just because returns from most other inputs have declined.  Out of pocket costs for most items used have increased little so mostly the inputs are a little time and labor.

Mid-summer processing is based around this being recommended as the best time to deworm spring born calves.  These babies are very susceptible to worms and are beginning to graze enough to pick up the worm larvae.  Deworming in late June or early July will remove the first worms that are grazed up and prevent major recontamination of pastures.  This coincides with a typical summer dry period so that calves then spend months with lower number of worms allowing increased growth.

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The Blame Game

High Plains Journal

At this writing, corn is approaching $8 per bushel, wheat $9 and soybeans are just under $16. Due to this unprecedented rise in grain and protein prices, all livestock feeders are losing big money. Not only that, the cost of diesel fuel to operate farms, factories and transportation is at an all-time high. In the grocery store, prices are going up and restaurants, bars and all forms of industry and services that depend on food or fuel are raising prices. The culprit has to be out there somewhere and he needs a noose around his neck.

It’s ethanol!

That’s about as corny as the screenplay of a wild west movie, but it is the mentality of livestock producers, consumers and most media. The basis of the entire ethanol debacle comes down to capitalism and politics. The marketplace is determining the value of all commodities and consumers are determining their spending based on income and needs. The result is a major shift from cheap food and fuel to (relatively) high prices for both necessities.

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BeefTalk: The Great Divide: Group Versus Individual Data

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

The other day, a bill came across the desk. On one part of the bill was listed the number of cattle. The description of the product on the bill was carcass data information, age and source verification and the producer’s name, lot and pen. The bill was for $285 for 94 head of steers.

The information across the sheet also reported individual animal weights; carcass data including kidney, pelvic and heart fat (KPH); dressing percentage; quality grade; ribeye; marbling; yield grade; and back fat.

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Cow Calf: This Year Test the Forage Before You Cut!

cattlenetwork.com

Hot dry summer weather brings about heat and drought stress on summer annuals.  Stressed plants such as the forage sorghums can occasionally accumulate dangerous concentrations of nitrates.  These high nitrate plants, either standing in the field, or fed as hay, can cause abortion in pregnant cattle, or death if consumed in great enough quantities.  Nitrates do not dissipate from suncured hay (in contrast to prussic acid), therefore once the hay is cut the nitrate levels remain constant.  Therefore, producers should test hay fields before they cut them for hay.  Stop by any OSU County Extension office for testing details.  This gives them an additional option of waiting and allowing for the nitrate to lower in concentration before harvesting the hay.  The major sources of nitrate toxicity in Oklahoma will be summer annual sorghum type plants, including sudan hybrids, sorgo-sudans, sorghum-sudans, millets, and Johnsongrass.  Other plants also may accumulate nitrates.  See OSU Fact Sheet F-2903 .

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