Daily Archives: October 1, 2007

Baxter Black: THE HORSE CLINICIAN

Baxter Black:  THE HORSE CLINICIAN

“ARE YOU TEACHIN’ HIM A LESSON?” she asked, eager to please, As I tried to keep from barfing, my head between my knees. “YOU HUNG ON LIKE A WIND SOCK! IT JUST TICKLED US TO DEATH!” Is she serious? I’m drooling, I can’t hardly catch my breath.

“WHEN YOU LEANED YOURSELF UP FORWARD AND KISSED HIM ‘TWEEN THE EARS THE WHOLE CLASS JUST WENT CRAZY! I GUESS YOU HEARD THE CHEERS!” That must be how I broke my nose and split my upper lip But I guess it looked like kissin’. “I JUST LOVE YOUR HORSEMANSHIP

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Manage Replacement Heifers for Fertility and Productivity in Herd

Manage Replacement Heifers for Fertility and Productivity in Herd

by: Dr. Mel Pence

University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine with Myra Burnsed, Jennifer Carter, Suzanne Sheldon, Kendrick Sudderth (UGA College of Veterinary Medicine class of 2008)

Cattle Today

Incorporating the following practices into your management of a heifer replacement system can be effective tools to increase the overall fertility and productivity of your herd, both in the short term and in the future. Within the beef cattle industry, the devotion of time and resources to the reproductive efforts in a herd holds tremendous potential for a significant increase in revenue.

Phenotypic Selection

The first step to developing quality heifers is to choose those that will best support the breeding goals of your program. This requires consideration of the genetic and phenotypic qualities you want to perpetuate.

Generally speaking, a producer should match their cows to the environment and their bulls to the market. In choosing heifers to keep for a development program, it is important to evaluate the heifers individually, yet also as a collective group. Within the replacement group the producer should aim for uniformity in the cow base, which will result in a more uniform calf crop each year.

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AHA completes first year of heterosis study

AHA completes first year of heterosis study

By Doug Rich

High Plains Journal

The American Hereford Association (AHA) held a media day at their headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., to announce the first-year results of a heterosis study.

The objective of the research project is to conduct controlled crossbreeding; comparing progeny sired by Hereford and Angus bulls, under real life commercial conditions. Cooperators in the project are California State University at Chico, Lacey Livestock, Harris Feeding Co., and Harris Ranch Beef Co.

Ten Hereford bulls were matched with 10 Angus bulls of comparable genetics. The study looked at the economic differences at the ranch, feedlot, and packing plant phases of production. DNA testing was used to determine the parentage of each calf used in the study.

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Operating Committee approves beef checkoff initiatives for 2008

Operating Committee approves beef checkoff initiatives for 2008

—Committee forced to cut more than $1.8 million in proposals.

Western Livestock Journal

The Beef Promotion Operating Committee last week funded a total of 42 program proposals with beef checkoff dollars for Fiscal 2008. At the same time, however, a tight budget forced the committee to reject more than $1.8 million in proposals to stay within the Cattlemen’s Beef Board’s (CBB’s) $46.8 million national program budget for the coming year.

“This was one of the most difficult Operating Committee meetings I’ve been through during all the years I’ve served on it because of all the tough choices we had to make,” said CBB Chairman Ken Stielow, a producer from Kansas. “At the same time, it was one of the best because of that. We have a very tight budget for 2008—down about 9 percent from the 2007 budget—so we really had to debate the merits of each program extensively.”

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Quality beef is always at a premium

Quality beef is always at a premium

By Jennifer Bremer

High Plains Journal

The demand for premium choice beef continues to be strong, according to Robbi Pritchard, professor of animal and range sciences at South Dakota State University.

Pritchard discussed the kinetics of marbling at the ProBeef Conference held at Iowa State University on Sept. 5 to 7. The conference brought agricultural scientists and producers from around the world to discuss the global influence the ethanol industry has on agriculture today and in the future.

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Calf Value Discovery sign-up deadline Oct. 19

Calf Value Discovery sign-up deadline Oct. 19

Rapid City Journal

Friday, Oct. 19, is the deadline to sign up for South Dakota State University’s 2007-08 Calf Value Discovery Program.

SDSU Extension beef specialist Cody Wright said the program lets producers better assess the value of their cattle and gain carcass and feedlot performance information to aid in management decisions.

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Colorado issues new ID requirements

Colorado issues new ID requirements

Western Livestock Journal

Colorado State University (CSU) Extension recently issued new rules regarding the implementation of premise ID for 4-H participants. The new rules are the result of a year’s worth of public comment on the issue, which appeared to CSU officials to be mostly negative. Some producers have indicated that CSU’s change may also be a result of a recent incident at the 2007 Colorado State Fair in Pueblo in which 4-H’ers participating in the livestock show were required to register their premise under the National Animal Identification System (NAIS).

The requirement implemented at the 2007 State Fair was decided by the Colorado State Fair Board of Authority in January of 2007 and received a great deal of public protest. Nevertheless, the rule remained in place for the State Fair in August, and an incident in which two 4-H’ers were barred from participating in the livestock show spawned a sea of controversy as a result.

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