Daily Archives: August 14, 2007

The Farmer’s Nightmare?

The Farmer’s Nightmare?
New York Times
Only a few years ago, ethanol was just a line in a farm-state politician’s stump speech – something that went down well with the locals but didn’t mean much to anyone else. Now, of course, ethanol is widely touted – and, within reason, rightly so – as an important part of America’s search for energy independence and greener fuels. One day, we may be using cellulosic ethanol, the kind derived from grasses. For now, the ethanol boom is all about corn. And the real question is whether that will finally kill American farming as we know it.

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DDG Glut May Be On the Way

DDG Glut May Be On the Way

By Todd Neeley

DTN Staff Reporter

Ethanol industry growth in Eastern Corn Belt states could eventually pose a problem: A glut of dried distillers grains.

While DDGs have gained international popularity as an animal feed, states such as Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and Michigan just don’t have enough animals to keep up with supply, said Jim Hansen, chief operating officer of Poet Nutrition based in Sioux Falls, S.D.

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Declining Quality Grades: A Review of Factors Reducing Marbling Deposition in Beef Cattle

Declining Quality Grades: A Review of Factors Reducing Marbling Deposition in Beef Cattle.

Larry Corah and Mark McCully, Certified Angus Beef

Background

Marbling role in eating quality:

Three factors govern consumer acceptance of beef: tenderness, flavor and juiciness. All add to the eating experience in their own way. Consumers clearly want some tolerable level of tenderness, granting that preference varies somewhat by the individual. However, the overriding factor behind the desire to eat beef is its unique flavor.

Meat flavor has been an extensive basis for research, and the flavor profile by animal species is very well understood. In beef, the unique flavor and aroma derive from the carbonyl compounds found in marbling (Smith, 2005). Thus, as the USDA quality grade increases from Standard to Prime, the flavor profile intensifies and improves to create a more acceptable eating experience (Smith, 1990).

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W.D. Farr, Former NCBA President, Cattle Pioneer, dies at age 97

W.D. Farr, Former NCBA President, Cattle Pioneer, dies at age 97

By The Denver Post

W.D. Farr, 97, a key figure in creating Colorado’s water projects and a legend in Northern Colorado, died at his home in Greeley early Monday afternoon.

Farr had been in ill health for the several months.

Former Colorado State University president Al Yates has known Farr since 1990, when Yates first came to Colorado, he said.

“I admired him and thought he was a mentor to all of us – all of us who cared about the land, and cared about Colorado, and cared about water,” Yates said.

Yates viewed Farr as a friend and mentor, he said, and also described him as a “quintessential scholar.”

“I’ve combed a great number of documents over the years,” Yates said. “None were more impressive than those that were written by W.D. Farr.”

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About to tip over

About to tip over

Mike Apley

Beef Magazine

We’ve all misread a few trends in life, some of which evolved into forces that drastically changed lives and entire industries.

Thirty years ago, who would have thought that the roughest, most mismanaged, cedar-infested grassland in the Flint Hills of Kansas would bring as much or more at auction than well-managed parcels? A lot of this market pressure results from the spillover of disposable income from urbanites looking for recreational ground, combined with some pretty reasonable interest rates.

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Dramatic Changes in Valuing Cattle

Dramatic Changes in Valuing Cattle

Mycattle.com

We’ve all misread a few trends in life, some of which evolved into forces that drastically changed lives and entire industries.

Thirty years ago, who would have thought that the roughest, most mismanaged, cedar-infested grassland in the Flint Hills of Kansas would bring as much or more at auction than well-managed parcels? A lot of this market pressure results from the spillover of disposable income from urbanites looking for recreational ground, combined with some pretty reasonable interest rates.

And what about the increasing effect of energy costs on agricultural production? We used to just shake our heads at the cost of fuel, but now we’re witnessing the effects of society’s need for SUVs competing with our need to feed livestock (ethanol).

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Management practices can reduce risk

Management practices can reduce risk

Land & Livestock Post

The basis of a beef cattle operation is a forage system that provides quality forages, in the right quantity, to livestock. Forages supply the major portions of protein, energy, minerals and vitamins in the diets of most beef cattle.

Health problems are usually minimized by the availability of adequate quantities of high-quality forage. There are however, certain situations which may occur that lead to health disorders. One such disorder, know as prussic acid poisoning, may occur in certain types of forages under certain weather conditions.

Beef cattle producers throughout the Brazos Valley area should be reminded that the first frost of the season comes, on the average, around Nov. 30. But as you well know, it may come sooner. Frost can spell trouble for beef cattle that are grazing pasture grasses such as Johnson grass, Sudan grass, sorghum or hybrids of these.

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