Daily Archives: March 15, 2007

Forage meeting focuses on watching your Ps and Ks

Forage meeting focuses on watching your Ps and Ks

 Purdue AG Answers

 A Purdue expert shares how managing potassium and phosphorous levels significantly increase forage yield and longevity, two goals for many producers.

 Jeff Volenec, a Purdue University professor of agronomy, will discuss keeping an alfalfa stand for eight years with proper phosphorous and potassium management during the keynote address of the Indiana Forage Council’s annual meeting.

FULL STORY

Observe bulls closely as breeding season begins.

Observe bulls closely as breeding season begins.

 Dr. Glen Selk, Oklahoma State University

 A good manager keeps an eye on his bulls during the breeding season to make sure that they are getting the cows bred.  Occasionally a bull that has passed a breeding soundness exam may have difficulty serving cows in heat, especially after heavy service.  Inability to complete normal service and low fertility are more detrimental than failure to detect cows in heat to calf crop percent.  Such problems can best be detected by observing bulls while they work.

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Parasites can rob gain, grade, profits from producers

Parasites can rob gain, grade, profits from producers

 Tri State Neighbor

 Parasites may be little, but they can cause big problems for beef producers.

 Gary Sides, nutritionist for Pfizer Animal Health, said the pests cut profits in many cattle operations.

FULL STORY

Swift’s Imprint: Nothing to laugh about

Swift’s Imprint: Nothing to laugh about

Maria St. Louis-Sanchez

The Tribune (CO)

To hear excerpts from an audio interview with WR “Bill” Farr, click on the Web Extras link to the right.

For years, Swift & Co. has been known as that big plant out east that many people on Greeley’s west side try not to acknowledge — except on windy days.

Even then, it’s only with a wrinkle of their noses.

FULL STORY

Thermography offers diagnostic applications for veterinarians

Thermography offers diagnostic applications for veterinarians

 By Robbie Ward
For the Daily News (MS)

Until recently, Scott Willard of Mississippi State University considered himself a bovine reproductive physiologist, not an entrepreneur selling artwork generated from thermal imaging or a provider of services and devices to fellow scientists.

An animal and dairy sciences department researcher at the university, he now is adding businessman to the professional hats he wears.

Willard recently established RAMS — an acronym for Remote Animal Monitoring Solutions — a company offering a variety of services and products to the livestock industry, as well as other research scientists and large animal managers.

FULL STORY

LimMark tags pair genetics with information

LimMark tags pair genetics with information

 Tri State Neighbor

 To build brand equity by getting Limousin-influenced animals recognized when they perform well in commercial settings, the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF) has teamed with Allflex USA to provide a simple, flexible marketing program for feeder calves and replacement females.

 The LimMark tagging program aids Limousin customers in identifying their cattle and positioning themselves for greater returns by coupling reputable genetics with documented information. That will be even more effective when NALF announces the program’s new data-management services later this spring.

FULL STORY

$4.00 corn should be easier to sell, farmer says

$4.00 corn should be easier to sell, farmer says

 By Mike McGinnis
Agriculture Online Markets Editor

OSCEOLA, Iowa–Ed Kordick, commodity services manager, Iowa Farm Bureau Federation, said it’s an exciting time to teach producers about marketing. But, the price levels make it difficult for the producers to make qualified decisions.

As part of the “Winning the Game” marketing program, Kordick recently gave producers ideas on pre-harvest marketing strategies.

“Since we’re at these high price levels, no one has a price reference,” Kordick said. “What we need to focus on is the revenue that is on the table.”

FULL STORY