Daily Archives: December 4, 2006

Fear and Greed, And Supply and Demand

Fear and Greed, And Supply and Demand

By Troy Marshall

Beef Magazine

After three years of record-breaking, bin-busting corn harvests, corn prices have defied all conventional wisdom by skyrocketing. Bred females have lost $300 and calves $150/head in the initial market implosion.

In the short-term, fear and greed rules, and they certainly took over the last several weeks. When one domino fell, the others followed closely, and market fundamentals became irrelevant. We went from a “never having another bad day” attitude to “we are heading to zero at Mach 1.”

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BeefTalk: Most Cow-calf Producers Are Animal-feeding Operations

BeefTalk: Most Cow-calf Producers Are Animal-feeding Operations

By Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist

NDSU Extension Service

Change, a force that all beef producers, and essentially all those who are caretakers of animals, will need to be prepared to face, is present. A major focus of change is the concept of animal-feeding operations within the livestock industry.

The point now is that more than likely you are an animal-feeding operation if you are in the beef business or any livestock business. Producers will need to become more familiar with what that means and its potential impact on the livestock operation. Forces of change are not unique in agriculture and have been known to come with significant impact.

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Results of Adjusting Feed Levels for Cows During Cold

Results of Adjusting Feed Levels for Cows During Cold
by Glenn Selk

Results from a classic, old experiment at Kansas State University suggests several advantages for adjusting energy levels for cold weather. This information was gathered during the 1979 – 1980 winter. The K-State researchers used 60 commercial cows fed in dry lot and fed one-half of the cows a steady diet based upon the thermal neutral requirements for body weight maintenance; the other 30 cows were fed a ration adjusted for 1% more feed for each degree of coldness. See the example listed in the previous article for dry hair coat cows. Beef cows exposed to cold require more energy for maintenance therefore the results below indicate the effectiveness of making those adjustments.

Results of Adjusting Feed Levels for Cows During Cold

Ration Adjusted for coldness

Ration NOT adjusted

Weight change during last 4.5 months of gestation

+115 pounds

+26 pounds

Weight change from fall to following fall at weaning

+10 pounds

-93 pounds

Percent cycling by 60 days after average calving date

82%

65%

Estimated average date of conception in subsequent breeding season

June 5

June 15

The amount of additional feed to account for the cold weather events that winter would be equivalent to 125 pounds of corn per cow. The advantages of such ration adjustments must be analyzed by considering the economic cost of the extra feed versus the potential for greater pounds of calf being sold in the future. Also it must be remember that the cows with extra feed during the winter, were 103 pounds heavier in the following fall and should be in better body condition than the cows on the “ration NOT adjusted” diet.

Source:Ames, D. R.1981. “Weather, what can you do about it?” in Western Beef Symposium October 26-27, 1981. Boise, Idaho.

Results of Adjusting Feed Levels for Cows During Cold

Results of Adjusting Feed Levels for Cows During Cold

Cattlenetwork.com

Results from a classic, old experiment at Kansas State University suggests several advantages for adjusting energy levels for cold weather. This information was gathered during the 1979 – 1980 winter. The K-State researchers used 60 commercial cows fed in dry lot and fed one-half of the cows a steady diet based upon the thermal neutral requirements for body weight maintenance; the other 30 cows were fed a ration adjusted for 1% more feed for each degree of coldness. See the example listed in the previous article for dry hair coat cows. Beef cows exposed to cold require more energy for maintenance therefore the results below indicate the effectiveness of making those adjustments.

FULL STORY

Feeding Natural Cattle Is Topic Of Free Publication

Feeding Natural Cattle Is Topic Of Free Publication

Cow/Calf Weekly

A new South Dakota State University (SDSU) online publication discusses raising cattle without implants, ionophores or antibiotics. In the publication, “Feeding Natural Cattle” (find it at agbiopubs.sdstate.edu/articles/ExEx2056.pdf), SDSU Extension personnel Tyler Melroe and Erik Loe detail the market potential for “natural” beef, the requirements of such a management and marketing program, and the attributes, drawbacks and economics of “natural” feeding.

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Ranch hands

Ranch hands

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

When you take care of a place like it’s your own, you have a home for a long time

On a farm road near Grandview, five white Suburbans followed a rancher to the corner of a grassy field.

About 30 students, dressed in Western boots, blue jeans and gray Stetsons, jumped out of the vehicles with pens and notepads. They listened intently as the tall, lanky rancher talked about growing healthy grass for cattle in an all-natural beef business.

‘When you take care of a place like it’s your own, you have a home for a long time,’ rancher Jon Taggart said.

The Texas Christian University ranch management program, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year, has thrived on teaching stewardship of the land and livestock. In the program, students are challenged to devise creative methods of turning a profit in a challenging business

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Changing Seasons, Changing Strategies

Changing Seasons, Changing Strategies

By Mike Boersma, County Extension Educator with the University of Minnesota

Murray County News

Anyone who knows me, knows that fall is my favorite time of year. The heat and humidity of summer (which I’ve never been a fan of) are long gone, the air is cool and dry, and of course, beef cattle are busy grazing mature, low quality forages! While there is a vast array of forages that could fit into this category, I think it’s important to pay attention to one of these that is widely available to producers this time of year-cornstalks.

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