Researchers Measure Cattle Sweat Rate, Seek Genetic Markers to Offset Heat Stress

Researchers Measure Cattle Sweat Rate, Seek Genetic Markers to Offset Heat Stress

Angus e-List

Using a device resembling an electric razor, University of Missouri (MU) researchers are measuring sweat rate in cattle in search of ways to help producers overcome heat stress in their herds.

According to an MU release, heat stress can be a major factor in limiting cattle growth and reproduction. Cattle sweat more in the shoulders than in the rump area due to a higher number of sweat glands, but different breeds sweat at different levels when exposed to heat, said Don Spiers, associate professor of animal science.

Spiers and other researchers studied three groups of cattle: Angus raised in Missouri, and Angus and Romosinuano raised in Florida. They compared sweat rates and corresponding body temperature of the three groups.

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