Daily Archives: November 6, 2006

Calculating Trace Minerals for Beef Cows

Calculating Trace Minerals for Beef Cows

University of Nebraska

This calculator will help you determine if the desired daily trace mineral consumption of your cow herd is being met. If it is not being met, then the calculator will help you through the calculation to determine the percentage or concentration of that trace mineral needed in the mineral supplement to meet the desired trace mineral daily consumption.

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University of Nebraska

This calculator will help you determine if the desired daily trace mineral consumption of your cow herd is being met. If it is not being met, then the calculator will help you through the calculation to determine the percentage or concentration of that trace mineral needed in the mineral supplement to meet the desired trace mineral daily consumption.

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What Determines the Amount of Feed Consumed Daily by a Cow

What Determines the Amount of Feed Consumed Daily by a Cow

Cattlenetwork.com

There are a number of different factors that determine the daily intake of a cow. The primary factors are cow weight, forage or diet quality, and stage of production. Cows that weigh 1,300 pounds will consume more on a daily basis compare to lighter weight cows that weigh 1,100 pounds. In addition, cows that are lactating will consume more feed than cows that are not lactating and intake is different for cows in early lactation compared to late lactation.

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Calculating Trace Minerals for Beef Cows

Calculating Trace Minerals for Beef Cows

University of Nebraska

This calculator will help you determine if the desired daily trace mineral consumption of your cow herd is being met. If it is not being met, then the calculator will help you through the calculation to determine the percentage or concentration of that trace mineral needed in the mineral supplement to meet the desired trace mineral daily consumption.

FULL STORY

BeefTalk: The Future of Beef – Consumer Issues and Demand

BeefTalk: The Future of Beef – Consumer Issues and Demand

By Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist

NDSU Extension Service

Although formerly somewhat distant from many producer conversations, the vested interest of consumers is now a reality in the beef business. There simply is no business unless the consumer is involved in the formula for the future.

Perhaps one doesn’t really like to admit it, but most of yesterday’s conversations usually were between producers. Buying bulls or replacement heifers and the subsequent marketing of the offspring was a discussion of producers’ likes and dislikes, not consumer desires.

The ability of cows and bulls to live and produce in a multitude of production environments led to the necessity of selection for adaptability. Cows and bulls were in an environment that had to meet the critical eye of the owner or manager. Hopefully, the environment mustered an arsenal of production traits that equated to efficient and profitable beef production.

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Make Sound Judgments about Herd Sires

Make Sound Judgments about Herd Sires

by: John L. Evans

Ph.D., Extension Beef Cattle Breeding Specialist,

Department of Animal Science, Oklahoma State University

Cattle Today

For many cattle producers, this is a time of year when important decisions are made regarding the cow herd. Many producers begin to receive sale catalogs, view sale publications, and may be receiving calls from previous bull suppliers. It is important for producers to make sound judgments about their herd sires. A poor bull buying decision might leave a producer with a product they don’t need or don’t want in their herd. On the other hand, a good bull buying decision will increase the producer’s chances of having a more profitable calf crop.

Why is bull selection important?

Sire selection, on average, has a greater impact on the genetic improvement of a herd than most producers realize. Because the sire is more likely to produce a higher number of calves in his lifetime compared to a cow, a sire has the potential to contribute a larger portion of the genes to the herd. Because of the large genetic contribution a sire makes to a herd of animals, it is important to manage the risk associated with the purchase of a new bull. Fortunately, the level of risk associated with the selection of a new bull is manageable using well planned breeding programs and high quality information.

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Is going organic worth the price?

Is going organic worth the price?

By BRYANT STAMFORD

Gannett News Service / Courier Post (NJ)

Ten years ago, I joined an organic food production co-op. It was the only way I could get fresh organic produce on a regular basis.

For a flat fee, I received a weekly delivery of organic vegetables or fruits during the growing season. Unfortunately, you had to accept whatever they gave you and you tended to get whatever crop happened to come in that week.

So I’d go to my front porch on Wednesday morning and find a bushel of squash, okra or spinach. You can imagine how this might challenge one’s culinary creativity, especially for someone like me who has almost no cooking skills.

It wasn’t very convenient or efficient, but I supported the co-op anyway, partly because at the time organic farmers weren’t welcome to sell their produce to the big retailers and the co-op was the only way they could stay in business.

The fact you now can walk into the supermarket and find a bona fide organic foods section tells you how far organic foods have come in the last decade.

Even Wal-Mart is planning to offer organic foods and Starbucks will use organic milk in its latte concoctions if you request it.

Organic foods once were considered cultlike but now are approaching mainstream status, as experts estimate nearly 40 percent of us are buying organic foods in one form or another.

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Rescue of wolves from near-extinction upsets US ranchers

Rescue of wolves from near-extinction upsets US ranchers

After being pushed to the brink of extinction in the early 1900s, more than 1,200 of the predators are roaming Idaho, Montana and Wyoming once again

AFP, SALMON, IDAHO

Taipei Times

When nine calves went missing this spring from a ranch in the remote and rugged mountains of Idaho, cattleman Lonell Wilson picked up his rifle and went looking for the culprits.

What he found were two gray wolves, a male and a female, sunning themselves in a clearing. So he shot them.

“Basically, I took care of the problem,” Wilson said.

Wilson is among more than a dozen livestock producers in Idaho who have hunted down wolves that attacked their cattle or sheep this year. He is among countless ranchers who say the wolves aren’t wanted, dead or alive.

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