Cattle Call

Cattle Call

By CAT URBIGKITCasper Star-Tribune correspondent

BOULDER — After 110 years of raising cattle in a harsh western Wyoming climate, there are some things you just know, without being able to explain them. Some might call it instinct, but it might just be something in your blood that’s been passed on from generation to generation.
That’s how it is with Lucky Seven Angus owner Jim Jensen. His family has been in the cattle business in Sublette County for more than a century, and Jensen plans to pass the ranching traditions on to the next generation as well.
“In 1895, my great-grandpa, James Jensen, moved to Boulder and worked at the Gilligan ranch, for cows as his wages,” Jensen said. “In 1896, he lived in a dugout in the Big Sandy area, shoveling snow off the grass in the winter so his cows and horses could eat. That’s how he started.”
James Jensen began acquiring property and eventually owned a large portion of the Boulder valley, but sold off portions of the ranch to others starting out in the cattle business. The ranch was passed down to the next generations, with some splits to accommodate brothers.
“I’m the next generation,” Jensen said, “and my three kids are the next generation.”
FULL STORY

Comments are closed.