Monthly Archives: April 2012

Y’all Don’t Mess With Us Farm Folk

Y’all Don’t Mess With Us Farm Folk

Gary Truitt

Hoosier AG Today

There is an old folk saying, “Let sleeping dogs lie.” Some well meaning bureaucrats at the Department of Labor wish they had done that.  Their plan to mandate new safety rules for children stirred up a hornet’s nest of angry farm families which resulted in a withdrawal of the proposal and a black eye for the Obama administration in a critical election year. 

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Preparing for Heat Stress in Cattle Back

Preparing for Heat Stress in Cattle Back

Warren Rusche

iGrow

Summer heat waves pose a serious danger to cattle.  It’s not only the death loss, but also the loss in performance and the potential for poorer reproductive performance of bulls and breeding females caused by heat stress that cause economic harm to beef producers.  Taking some steps now to plan ahead will put producers in a better position to deal with heat waves when and if they occur.

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Producers Face Scrutiny From Public Over Antibiotic Feeding

Producers Face Scrutiny From Public Over Antibiotic Feeding

Stephen B. Blezinger, PhD, PAS

The use of antibiotics in food animal feeding has been a common practice for years. It has also been under fire from a variety of scientists, doctors, consumer groups and the media for years.

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Society is Shaping Animal Welfare

Society is Shaping Animal Welfare

Troy Smith

Angus Journal

But the term animal husbandry has largely been dropped from the agricultural education lexicon. Generally, it’s been replaced by animal science, which has been collectively defined as disciplines of study that investigate biological issues such as physiology, anatomy, reproduction and development of domestic animals or animals that are controlled and cared for, to some degree, by humans. It certainly has a more academic sound. It’s more … well, scientific.

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Labor Department withdraws ag child labor regulations

Labor Department withdraws ag child labor regulations

Tom Karst

The Packer

The Department of Labor is dropping the idea of giving farmers new rules to follow on how to use child labor.

With a 2011 proposed rule from the agency attracting more than 10,000 public comments, the move by the federal government to add new rules to regulate use of youth labor on U.S. farms was strongly opposed by U.S. agriculture groups.

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USDA Now Searching For Cohorts and Offspring of BSE Case 4

USDA Now Searching For Cohorts and Offspring of BSE Case 4

Dr. John Clifford

Oklahoma Farm Report

USDA Now Searching For Cohorts and Offspring- Dr. John Clifford on BSE Case 4 USDA continues to do basic detective work on the California dairy cow reported as being positive for BSE- or what has been called Mad Cow Disease- earlier this week.

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Rotational Grazing

Rotational Grazing

Randy Kuhn

Beef Today

The cost of cattle production is rising and producers seeking to put more grass weight on their cattle are finding that sound pasture management has never been more attractive and/or profitable.

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Livestock are more likely to eat poisonous plants when pasture grass is overgrazed

Livestock are more likely to eat poisonous plants when pasture grass is overgrazed

Gayle Smith

Tri State Livestock News

Pastures that have been seriously overgrazed or overstocked can predispose livestock to eating anything they can, especially if they are hungry, according to a clinical science professor at Colorado State University.

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It’s calving time at Aspen’s Cozy Point Ranch

It’s calving time at Aspen’s Cozy Point Ranch

Janet Urquhart

The Aspen Times

Monroe Summers is as anxious as an expectant father in a delivery room these days. Only he’s not waiting on the birth of a child; he’s hoping for the successful delivery of 25 calves and their survival in the first crucial hours after they land in a pasture outside Aspen.

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Mad cow strain found in Tulare County mysterious

Mad cow strain found in Tulare County mysterious

Barbara Anderson

The Fresno Bee

Federal officials have been quick to reassure the public that there is no health threat from the mad cow disease discovered in the carcass of a Tulare County dairy cow.

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Labor Department Withdraws Proposed Child Farm Rules

Labor Department Withdraws Proposed Child Farm Rules

Gary Truitt

Hoosier AG Today

After months of rural outrage and mounting political pressure, the Labor Department announced late Thursday evening that it was dropping it plans to impose new safety rules that would have prevented children and young people from doing most activities on their family farms.

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Vogel Breaks Down Animal Welfare for Beef Producers

Vogel Breaks Down Animal Welfare for Beef Producers

Peggy Coffeen

Angus Journal

‘In order to maintain consumer trust,we must consistently do the right thing,” Kurt Vogel, from the University of Wisconsin–River Falls (UWRF), told cattle producers at an early February Wisconsin Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting.

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Selecting for calmer cattle

Selecting for calmer cattle

John Maday

Bovine Veterinarian

Stockmen know that wild, temperamental cattle present a danger to handlers, facilities and other cattle. They’ve also learned that cattle behavior can play a role in performance, health and carcass value, making selection for calmer cattle a worthwhile effort.

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Herd Rebuilding May Emphasize Genetics

Herd Rebuilding May Emphasize Genetics

Katie Micik

DTN

Quality beef genetics may be one thing that gets a big boost from the national cattle herd’s rapid shrinkage over the last year, a panel of experts said Monday at the North American Agricultural Journalists annual meeting.

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Pasture considerations for an unusually early spring

Pasture considerations for an unusually early spring

Rita Brhel

The Cattle Business Weekly

During one of the mildest winters on record, America’s cattle country started seeing spring temperatures in January. Pastures greened up months ahead of schedule, and by the end of March, some producers likened their pasture growth to that of early June.

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BeefTalk: Birth Weight in the Eyes of a Chicken

BeefTalk: Birth Weight in the Eyes of a Chicken

Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

The question of birth weight is always a good topic during calving. More precisely, birth weight involving calving replacement heifers or first-calf heifers. Generally, older cows have few calving problems.

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Steve Cornett:  Clarification on the Mad Cow Leak

Steve Cornett:  Clarification on the Mad Cow Leak

Beef Today

Hold on. Before you read the blog below, realize that the beef industry’s issues management team was NOT in the official loop. It turns out their preemptive efforts—the getting ready for the announcement—was based on the same "rumor" that the futures traders were acting on.

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What can you do with inedible cows?

What can you do with inedible cows?

Brian Palmer

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

A cow has tested positive for mad cow disease in America for the first time since 2006, the United States Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday. Officials were quick to assure the public that the slaughtered former dairy cow was located at a rendering plant, and that its flesh was never going to enter the human food supply. If you’re not going to eat a dead cow’s meat, what are you supposed to do with it?

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USDA Releases Details In Mad Cow Case

USDA Releases Details In Mad Cow Case

Fox News

Federal officials said Thursday that they now know the latest cow found in the U.S. with mad-cow disease was 10 years and seven months old and came from a dairy farm in Tulare County, Calif., giving investigators new pieces of the puzzle as they try to trace back the animal’s origins.

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Buyers of U.S. beef keep importing after mad cow case

Buyers of U.S. beef keep importing after mad cow case

Charlie Dunmore and Theopolis Waters

Reuters

Major export markets for U.S. beef from Canada to Japan stayed open after the United States reported its first case of mad cow disease in six years amid assurances that rigorous surveillance had safeguarded the food system.

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