Daily Archives: January 24, 2007

Ohio Beef Newsletter available

The January 24, issue # 522, of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter is now posted to the web at:

http://fairfield.osu.edu/ag/beef/beefJany24.html

Are you calving on pasture right now? Don’t laugh, it’s being done in Carroll

County. If you want to see how, visit this week’s letter for details on an

opportunity to see first hand how the McKarns’ are doing it.

Articles include:

* Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

* Consignment Deadline for 2007 OCA Seedstock Improvement Bull Sales is

January 31st

* Forage Focus: Pasture Walk at the McKarns’ This Friday

* Alfalfa Management School

* School Bells Ring for Beef Producers

* Becoming an Organically Certified Producer

* Weekly Roberts Agricultural Commodity Market Report

Stan

———-

Stan Smith

Program Assistant, Agriculture

OSU Extension, Fairfield County

831 College Ave., Suite D

Lancaster, OH 43130

e-mail: smith.263@cfaes.osu.edu

voice: 740.653.5419 ext. 24

fax: 740.687.7010

Cattle Update: Fat Supplementation In Forage Diets

Cattle Update: Fat Supplementation In Forage Diets

Cattlenetwork.com

Fat is much higher in energy compared to grains. Research has shown that high levels of fat in the diet (in excess of 6-8% of the ration dry matter) lowers forage digestion. The hypothesis is that fat in high fat rations coats the forage in the rumen making the forage inaccessible to the microform. In addition, high fat rations may alter the rumen microform populations. This usually means that approximately .4 lb to .6 lb of supplemental fat could be fed in a feeding program in high roughage diets. Supplementing 2 lbs of a 20% fat supplement would be an example of a supplementation program strategy when considering that there will be some fat coming from other feed sources in the diet. When developing beef cow diets, I keep the level of fat in the diet so not to exceed 5% fat in the total diet.

FULL STORY

Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

Bull Selection Techniques Bull Selection Techniques

The trick in a good beef-breeding plan is to stack the bull pen full of great EPDs.

By Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist NDSU Extension Service

On most winter nights or even days, most cattle producers do not sit around and ponder the activity of blowfish, sometimes called puffer fish. No, this time of year cattle producers find themselves paging through bull catalogs and dreaming of the perfect bull.

The evening pictures bring about a certain amount of contentment to finish the day. The perusal of the estimated progeny differences (EPDs) rejuvenates some basic math skills, quickly sorting the best to the top. But what about blowfish?

FULL STORY

Efficient Calving Requires Pre-Season Management

Efficient Calving Requires Pre-Season Management

by: Stephen B. Blezinger, Ph.D, PAS

Cattle Today

One of the most critical times of the year on breeding cattle operations is calving season. In general, cattle ranches or farms calve in three different time frames: spring, fall or year round. Granted there are any number of variations to this but this describes the vast majority of cow-calf production units. On spring calving operations, late winter and early spring are wonderful times of the year. This is when calving takes place and the foundation for the operation’s profitability is laid. Every cow-calf operation contains basic components without which it cannot survive. First, the producer has to get the females bred. Second, the bred females have to carry the unborn calf to term. Third, she has to calve with a minimum of stress to the cow and to the calf. Finally, she needs to raise that calf to weaning. While all of these are vital to operational success and are equal in importance, the calving period seems to be the most stressful for all concerned, the cow AND the producer.

FULL STORY

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

WCCO.com

(AP) Denver, Colo. Swift & Co., one of the nation’s largest meatpacking processors, may find it more lucrative to sell its assets separately instead of as a whole or testing the market with a stock offering, industry analysts said Tuesday.

The privately held Swift, which was targeted by a wide-scale immigration raid last month, is looking into strategies ranging from refinancing to a sale or initial public offering, a decision executives said was made after they received some unsolicited inquiries over the past six months.

With beef and pork processing plants in six states, including Minnesota, and an operation in Australia, Swift may find buyers more interested in pieces rather than the whole company, the analysts said.

FULL STORY

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

WCCO.com

(AP) Denver, Colo. Swift & Co., one of the nation’s largest meatpacking processors, may find it more lucrative to sell its assets separately instead of as a whole or testing the market with a stock offering, industry analysts said Tuesday.

The privately held Swift, which was targeted by a wide-scale immigration raid last month, is looking into strategies ranging from refinancing to a sale or initial public offering, a decision executives said was made after they received some unsolicited inquiries over the past six months.

With beef and pork processing plants in six states, including Minnesota, and an operation in Australia, Swift may find buyers more interested in pieces rather than the whole company, the analysts said.

FULL STORY

Southern Colorado ranchers still need hay

Southern Colorado ranchers still need hay

Cattle industry officials hope to connect hay sellers with buyers.

By ANTHONY A. MESTAS

THE PUEBLO CHIEFTAIN

The frozen coating of snow on Colorado’s Eastern Plains continues to make it impossible for many area cattle to graze.

While some of the state’s ranchers hit by recent blizzards still are searching for their cattle, others now are looking for hay, according to Terry Fankhauser, executive vice president of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association.

In response, Colorado Cattlemen’s Association officials put out a call Monday to locate hay resources and an Internet network to connect hay sellers with needy ranchers.

“Most ranchers on the Eastern Plains graze their cattle for a good portion of the winter. The blanket of snow that has covered the plains makes this impossible now, and the hay supplies are dwindling rapidly,” Fankhauser said.

FULL STORY

Owen Named National Poll-ette of the Year

Owen Named National Poll-ette of the Year

American Hereford Association

The National Organization of Poll-ettes (NOP) has named Kelly Owen, Ft. Payne, Ala., the 2006 National Poll-ette of the Year. For her contributions to the Hereford breed, youth and the NOP, Kelly was bestowed with this honor Jan. 13 at the 2007 National Western Stock Show. Second place was awarded to Elizabeth Wissner, Mukwonago, Wis., and third to Eva Hamman, Jacksboro, Texas.

Kelly served on the NOP board of directors from 2000-04 and was chairman in ’04. “I had so much fun serving on the Poll-ette board and raising money for and supporting all the Hereford youth,” Kelly says. “The memories will always hold a special place in my heart.”

Her heart is one of gold, says Dianne Peebles, NOP past president, who praises Kelly for her efforts on behalf of young people. Katlin Mulvaney, eight-year member of the Alabama Junior Hereford Association, testifies to what Kelly and her husband, Randy, have done specifically for juniors in the Southeast. The couple has donated awards and apparel for the junior regional show, and also hauled the Alabama juniors’ cattle by semitrailer to the 2001 and 2002 Junior National Hereford Expos in Montana and South Dakota. “They take any opportunity to help and serve,” Katlin says. “They’ll drop everything just to help you.”

FULL STORY

Wisconsin increases RFID reimbursement

Wisconsin increases RFID reimbursement

Brownfield Network

by Bob Meyer

The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) is expanding the incentive for the purchase of livestock identification tags. The Department will now reimburse 50% of the cost of approved Radio Frequency (RFID) tags up to $1.00 per animal. The program was introduced late last year offering 25% reimbursement; producers who enrolled at that time will automatically be rolled into the higher cost-share program.

FULL STORY

DDGs Stocker Supplementation Shows Potential

DDGs Stocker Supplementation Shows Potential

Beef Stocker Trends

“I’m very much enthused about using dry distiller’s grains (DDGs) to produce more beef on a fixed-land base. The caveat will be to see what previous supplementation does to subsequent wheat grazing gains. We’ll have some data on that in the spring,” says Jim MacDonald, a Texas Ag Extension Service (TAES) beef nutritionist.

Though MacDonald expects the majority of DDGs produced via ethanol to be used by feedlots and dairies, he believes the sheer volume of availability will provide stocker opportunity, too. More specifically he explains the most promising opportunity may be in the situation where lightweight calves are held for a couple of months before they go onto wheat.

FULL STORY

Biotech Traits Can Improve Alfalfa

Biotech Traits Can Improve Alfalfa

eHay Weekly

Several biotech traits currently being tested and developed in alfalfa could enhance its value, says Mark McCaslin, Forage Genetics International. “It’s an exciting time for those involved in alfalfa improvement,” McCaslin says. “We see significant potential for new traits to increase forage yield, improve forage quality and/or increase the role of alfalfa in animal diets.”

FULL STORY

Cattle Feeders Encouraged To Sign Up For BVD Screening

Cattle Feeders Encouraged To Sign Up For BVD Screening

Cattlenetwork.com

BILLINGS – A pilot project to screen Montana cattle for persistent infection of bovine viral diarrhea is now a permanent program, says Clint Peck, director of the Montana Beef Quality Assurance programs for Montana State University.

Ranchers and cattle feeders can sign up any time for the 2007 Montana BVD-PI Herd Screening Project, Peck said. The ranchers and feeders do the work themselves, but they’ll receive technical assistance and limited financial support through 2007. They’ll also receive a screening kit. The project is supported by the Montana Stockgrowers Association and funded through the Montana Beef Network. Participation is free and voluntary.

“The project is designed to improve the overall health of Montana’s cow herd and add value to the state’s calf crop,“ Peck said.

FULL STORY

Livestock industry nervous as Bush calls for 35 billion gallon RFS

Livestock industry nervous as Bush calls for 35 billion gallon RFS

by Peter Shinn

Brownfield Network

Ethanol backers got another boost from Tuesday night’s State of the Union address. As expected, President Bush called for a more than four-fold increase in the Renewable Fuels Standard from its current level of 7.5 billion gallons by 2012 to 35 billion gallons by 2017.

The policy statement is generated immediate excitement among ethanol supporters. But the nation’s largest and most politically influential livestock groups want the Bush administration to consider the negative impact high feed costs may have on U.S food production.

This year’s call for increased dependence on renewable fuels is not the first from President Bush. Last year, the President’s call to end the nation’s “addiction to foreign oil” gave fresh momentum to the U.S. ethanol industry. And there’s little doubt the President’s use of the bully pulpit helped drive growth in renewable fuels. That’s according to Randy Klein, Director of Marketing for the Nebraska Corn Board.

FULL STORY

National Beef Channels AngusSource To CAB

National Beef Channels AngusSource To CAB

Cattlenetwork.com

Cattle genetically verified through the AngusSourceâ program have been eligible for the Certified Angus Beef â brand since June. Soon producers might start seeing premiums for those Angus-based fed cattle.

National Beef Packing Company LLC reported it has filed paperwork with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to allow AngusSource cattle to be considered for its premium Angus programs. National will be the first packer to use this additional means to identify “Angus-type” cattle, historically defined by the phenotypic, 51% black-hided criteria.

Art Wagner, vice president of procurement, said he expects the system to be operational shortly.

FULL STORY

Johanns: Talks With Japan Needed To Increase Beef Trade

Johanns: Talks With Japan Needed To Increase Beef Trade

Cattlenetwork.com

WASHINGTON (Dow Jones)-U.S. and Japanese government officials need to sit down for talks on how the countries can best move toward increasing beef trade, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said Tuesday.

Japan restricts exports of U.S. beef by requiring that it be derived from cattle under 21 months old. Johanns said he would like to see that restriction lifted and stressed that he doesn’t want the process to stretch out any longer than it has to.

Japan made it clear earlier this month that it wants to send auditing teams back to the U.S. to once again to inspect U.S. beef processing plants before considering a move to lift the restriction.

FULL STORY

California lawmaker wants cloned meat labeled

California lawmaker wants cloned meat labeled

Meat News

A California State Senator has proposed legislation that would require labels on all cloned food products sold in the state.

California State Senator Carole Migden (D-San Francisco) introduced legislation last week requiring clear labels on “any food product from a cloned animal or its offspring that is sold in California for human consumption.”

“Like the majority of Americans, I have concerns about why cloned cows should be a part of our food system,” Senator Migden said, in a news release. “If the FDA approves placing food products from cloned animals on our grocery store shelves, California consumers ought to know what they’re buying and be assured of the product’s safety.”

FULL STORY