Daily Archives: January 24, 2007

Ohio Beef Newsletter available

The January 24, issue # 522, of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter is now posted to the web at:

http://fairfield.osu.edu/ag/beef/beefJany24.html

Are you calving on pasture right now? Don’t laugh, it’s being done in Carroll

County. If you want to see how, visit this week’s letter for details on an

opportunity to see first hand how the McKarns’ are doing it.

Articles include:

* Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

* Consignment Deadline for 2007 OCA Seedstock Improvement Bull Sales is

January 31st

* Forage Focus: Pasture Walk at the McKarns’ This Friday

* Alfalfa Management School

* School Bells Ring for Beef Producers

* Becoming an Organically Certified Producer

* Weekly Roberts Agricultural Commodity Market Report

Stan

———-

Stan Smith

Program Assistant, Agriculture

OSU Extension, Fairfield County

831 College Ave., Suite D

Lancaster, OH 43130

e-mail: smith.263@cfaes.osu.edu

voice: 740.653.5419 ext. 24

fax: 740.687.7010

Cattle Update: Fat Supplementation In Forage Diets

Cattle Update: Fat Supplementation In Forage Diets

Cattlenetwork.com

Fat is much higher in energy compared to grains. Research has shown that high levels of fat in the diet (in excess of 6-8% of the ration dry matter) lowers forage digestion. The hypothesis is that fat in high fat rations coats the forage in the rumen making the forage inaccessible to the microform. In addition, high fat rations may alter the rumen microform populations. This usually means that approximately .4 lb to .6 lb of supplemental fat could be fed in a feeding program in high roughage diets. Supplementing 2 lbs of a 20% fat supplement would be an example of a supplementation program strategy when considering that there will be some fat coming from other feed sources in the diet. When developing beef cow diets, I keep the level of fat in the diet so not to exceed 5% fat in the total diet.

FULL STORY

Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

Don’t Buy Blowfish, Use EPDs

Bull Selection Techniques Bull Selection Techniques

The trick in a good beef-breeding plan is to stack the bull pen full of great EPDs.

By Kris Ringwall, Beef Specialist NDSU Extension Service

On most winter nights or even days, most cattle producers do not sit around and ponder the activity of blowfish, sometimes called puffer fish. No, this time of year cattle producers find themselves paging through bull catalogs and dreaming of the perfect bull.

The evening pictures bring about a certain amount of contentment to finish the day. The perusal of the estimated progeny differences (EPDs) rejuvenates some basic math skills, quickly sorting the best to the top. But what about blowfish?

FULL STORY

Efficient Calving Requires Pre-Season Management

Efficient Calving Requires Pre-Season Management

by: Stephen B. Blezinger, Ph.D, PAS

Cattle Today

One of the most critical times of the year on breeding cattle operations is calving season. In general, cattle ranches or farms calve in three different time frames: spring, fall or year round. Granted there are any number of variations to this but this describes the vast majority of cow-calf production units. On spring calving operations, late winter and early spring are wonderful times of the year. This is when calving takes place and the foundation for the operation’s profitability is laid. Every cow-calf operation contains basic components without which it cannot survive. First, the producer has to get the females bred. Second, the bred females have to carry the unborn calf to term. Third, she has to calve with a minimum of stress to the cow and to the calf. Finally, she needs to raise that calf to weaning. While all of these are vital to operational success and are equal in importance, the calving period seems to be the most stressful for all concerned, the cow AND the producer.

FULL STORY

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

WCCO.com

(AP) Denver, Colo. Swift & Co., one of the nation’s largest meatpacking processors, may find it more lucrative to sell its assets separately instead of as a whole or testing the market with a stock offering, industry analysts said Tuesday.

The privately held Swift, which was targeted by a wide-scale immigration raid last month, is looking into strategies ranging from refinancing to a sale or initial public offering, a decision executives said was made after they received some unsolicited inquiries over the past six months.

With beef and pork processing plants in six states, including Minnesota, and an operation in Australia, Swift may find buyers more interested in pieces rather than the whole company, the analysts said.

FULL STORY

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

Analysts: Swift’s Assets May Be Sold Separately

WCCO.com

(AP) Denver, Colo. Swift & Co., one of the nation’s largest meatpacking processors, may find it more lucrative to sell its assets separately instead of as a whole or testing the market with a stock offering, industry analysts said Tuesday.

The privately held Swift, which was targeted by a wide-scale immigration raid last month, is looking into strategies ranging from refinancing to a sale or initial public offering, a decision executives said was made after they received some unsolicited inquiries over the past six months.

With beef and pork processing plants in six states, including Minnesota, and an operation in Australia, Swift may find buyers more interested in pieces rather than the whole company, the analysts said.

FULL STORY

Southern Colorado ranchers still need hay

Southern Colorado ranchers still need hay

Cattle industry officials hope to connect hay sellers with buyers.

By ANTHONY A. MESTAS

THE PUEBLO CHIEFTAIN

The frozen coating of snow on Colorado’s Eastern Plains continues to make it impossible for many area cattle to graze.

While some of the state’s ranchers hit by recent blizzards still are searching for their cattle, others now are looking for hay, according to Terry Fankhauser, executive vice president of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association.

In response, Colorado Cattlemen’s Association officials put out a call Monday to locate hay resources and an Internet network to connect hay sellers with needy ranchers.

“Most ranchers on the Eastern Plains graze their cattle for a good portion of the winter. The blanket of snow that has covered the plains makes this impossible now, and the hay supplies are dwindling rapidly,” Fankhauser said.

FULL STORY