Daily Archives: April 25, 2006

Wells dry up due to drought

Wells dry up due to drought

KYTV, Springfield, MO
By David Catanese, KY3 News

Despite rainfall on Monday, many parts of the Ozarks are still 18 inches below normal for the year.

This severe drought has caused many wells to go completely dry. It’s keeping well drillers busier than usual, and they aren’t only drilling more wells — they’re drilling them deeper.

FULL STORY

Meaty Choices

Meaty Choices

HOI Channel 19

By Jen Christensen
Posted: Monday, April 24, 2006 at 2:47 PM
Beef as a Food Source
According to the USDA, Americans consume an average of 200 pounds of meat per person/year. About 60 pounds of that meat is beef.

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VETS HUNT SOURCE OF ANTHRAX

VETS HUNT SOURCE OF ANTHRAX

Mirror.co.uk

VETS were today searching for the source of Britain’s first outbreak of anthrax in four years.

They were investigating whether the death of two cows at a farm was linked to an outbreak which killed seven cattle on the same site 35 years ago.

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Cattlesoft, Inc. Releases Record Keeping Solution for Cattle Producers with CattleMax 2006

Cattlesoft, Inc. Releases Record Keeping Solution for Cattle Producers with CattleMax 2006

The industry-leading cattle management software company announces the newest breakthrough in connecting cattle and computers with CattleMax 2006. The new version expanded on previous versions with added flexibility for ranchers to customize the program to fit their operation and extended National ID compliance features. CattleMax 2006 is designed to be a complete solution for the record keeping and herd management needs of today’s rancher.

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Farmers make progress in fields with dry weather

Farmers make progress in fields with dry weather

York (NE) News-Times./.The Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. — Mostly dry weather last week enabled Nebraska producers to begin field work in earnest.

The Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service reported Monday that the combination of high winds, especially in the Panhandle, and no precipitation dried soils and allowed farmers to make steady progress in the fields.

FULL STORY

Cattle drive re-enactment set

Cattle drive re-enactment set

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS./.ARKCITY.NET

ELLSWORTH, Kan. (AP) — Would-be cowboys will shell out big bucks this fall to re-enact an old-fashioned cattle drive through central Kansas.

City officials in Ellsworth expect about 80 people to spend $1,000 each to participate in the Great American Cattle Drive, a three-day run in late September in which drovers — the name given to cowboys on drives — will lead about 60 head of cattle into town.

The proceeds will help renovate the town’s historic insurance building and establish the National Drover’s Hall of Fame.

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High quality forage, services can turn profit

High quality forage, services can turn profit

By Tim W. McAlavy, Texas A&M
North Texas e-News
Apr 24, 2006

PLAINVIEW – West Texas forage producers need to decide if they are going to offer a service with the forage they grow, or simply market it as a commodity on a least-cost basis. Whichever, a new standard of interpreting forage quality – Relative Feed Quality – may come into play, said Dr. Dan Undersander, University of Wisconsin Extension forage agronomist, at a recent Texas Alliance for Water Conservation forage conference in Plainview.

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RISING NITROGEN PRICES PUTS FOCUS BACK ON CLOVERS

RISING NITROGEN PRICES PUTS FOCUS BACK ON CLOVERS

Cattletoday.com

by: Richard Watson – MSU Forage Specialist
Jane Parish and Blair McKinley – MSU Beef Specialists
John Anderson – MSU Extension Livestock Economist
Terry Engelken – MSU College of Veterinary Medicine

If you were to ask producers to make a list of the greatest concerns they have for the future of beef cattle production, I would imagine that the rising costs of key inputs like Nitrogen (N) fertilizer might rank among the top items. This rising trend in input costs, set against the typically cyclic nature of commodity products such as beef, will inevitably increase economic pressures to change the way we do things in the future.

FULL STORY