Daily Archives: April 18, 2006

Animal ID System Won’t Require Birth Date

Animal ID System Won’t Require Birth Date

CBSNEWS

WASHINGTON, Apr. 17, 2006

(AP) A livestock tracking system planned by the government will not include the age of animals, despite the key role age has played in mad cow disease investigations.

Agriculture Department officials say they don’t want to overburden ranchers and can track most birth dates.

Critics said the omission could make the system worthless.

FULL STORY

S.Korea to assess resumption of US beef import

S.Korea to assess resumption of US beef import

08:14′ 18/04/2006 (GMT+7)
Vietnamnet

South Korean Agriculture Ministry said Friday that experts are checking the birth date of a U.S. cow diagnosed last month with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) as a part of assessment on whether to lift ban against the imports of U.S. beef.

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Mad cow seems to have lost its sizzle on the political barbecue

Mad cow seems to have lost its sizzle on the political barbecue

April 17, 2006 – 7:08pm
National News CFRB Radio, Toronto

By: DENNIS BUECKERT

OTTAWA (CP) – Mad cow disease seems to be losing its shock value, judging from the muted response to Canada’s fifth confirmed case, but scientific concerns about the risk to public health continue to be debated.

Beef and livestock prices barely budged when the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed this weekend that a B.C. dairy cow had tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy, as mad cow disease is scientifically known.

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Farmers preparing fields for corn planting

Farmers preparing fields for corn planting

York Times-News
The Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. — Warm and windy conditions allowed producers to get back into their fields as soil began to dry out last week.

Most field work involved tillage and application of fertilizers and chemicals in preparation for corn and soybean planting. In the west, sugarbeet planting was progressing, the Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service reported Monday.

Temperatures averaged 13 degrees above normal. Soil temperatures jumped nearly 10 degrees and were 5 to 10 degrees above year-ago levels.

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Feed rules ‘too lax’ in Canada and U.S.

Feed rules ‘too lax’ in Canada and U.S.

U.S. expert comments after mad cow found in B.C.

Wency Leung, Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Canada and the U.S. have been too complacent in regulating cattle products in animal feed, a U.S. expert on mad cow disease said Monday, after confirmation that the brain-wasting illness had been found in a B.C. dairy cow.

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GENETIC SELECTION IS THE KEY TO UNLOCKING PROFITABILITY

GENETIC SELECTION IS THE KEY TO UNLOCKING PROFITABILITY

by: Larry Keenan
RAAA Research/Special
Cattletoday.com

Throughout the year, cattle producers make numerous decisions that impact the economic well being of their operation. Managerial decisions are made on a daily basis and while some require little research, the impact of others warrants thorough study. One decision that rises to the top of this list is selecting bulls to breed to your cows.

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U.S. vet to assist mad cow investigation

U.S. vet to assist mad cow investigation

CanWest News Service
Published: Monday, April 17, 2006

VANCOUVER – After B.C.’s first case of mad cow disease was confirmed Sunday, a U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinarian arrived in Canada on Monday to help investigate the source of the disease.

Jim Rogers, a spokesman for the USDA, did not know how long the U.S. veterinarian would remain in the country, but said it was common for Canada to invite U.S. officials to participate in investigations of animal diseases.

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